Home
Videos uploaded by user “encyclopediacc”
Brooks's law
 
05:21
Brooks's law is a principle in software development which says that "adding manpower to a late software project makes it later." It was coined by Fred Brooks in his 1975 book The Mythical Man-Month. The corollary of Brooks's Law is that there is an incremental person who, when added to a project, makes it take more, not less time. Brooks adds that "Nine women can't make a baby in one month." This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 2160 encyclopediacc
Charles Vane
 
10:59
Charles Vane was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping. His pirate career lasted from 1716 to 1719. His flagship was a brigantine named the Ranger. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3962 encyclopediacc
World Health Organization
 
37:33
The World Health Organization is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, with its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The main responsibility was to help anybody in need of medical assistance. The constitution of the World Health Organization had been signed by all 69 countries of the United Nations by 22 July 1946, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox. Its current priorities include communicable diseases, in particular, HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis; the mitigation of the effects of non-communicable diseases; sexual and reproductive health, development, and aging; nutrition, food security and healthy eating; occupational health; substance abuse; and drive the development of reporting, publications, and networking. WHO is responsible for the World Health Report, a leading international publication on health, the worldwide World Health Survey, and World Health Day . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 14801 encyclopediacc
Public administration
 
33:46
Public administration refers to two meanings: first, it is concerned with the implementation of government policy; second, it is an academic discipline that studies this implementation and prepares civil servants for working in the public service. As a "field of inquiry with a diverse scope" its "fundamental goal... is to advance management and policies so that government can function." Some of the various definitions which have been offered for the term are: "the management of public programs"; the "translation of politics into the reality that citizens see every day"; and "the study of government decision making, the analysis of the policies themselves, the various inputs that have produced them, and the inputs necessary to produce alternative policies." This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 22048 encyclopediacc
Levant
 
07:09
The Levant , also known as the Eastern Mediterranean, is a geographic and cultural region consisting of the "eastern Mediterranean littoral between Anatolia and Egypt". The Levant today consists of the island of Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, and part of southern Turkey . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2995 encyclopediacc
Programma 101
 
07:31
The Programma 101, also known as Perottina, was the first commercial "desktop computer". Produced by Italian manufacturer Olivetti, based in Piedmont, and invented by the Italian engineer Pier Giorgio Perotto. It was launched at the 1964 New York World's Fair, volume production started in 1965. A futuristic design for its time, the Programma 101 was priced at $3,200 . About 44,000 units were sold, primarily in the US. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 411 encyclopediacc
Paresthesia
 
06:36
Paresthesia , is a sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect. The manifestation of a paresthesia may be transient or chronic. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 3477 encyclopediacc
Graduate Record Examinations
 
24:57
The Graduate Record Examinations is a standardised test that is an admissions requirement for most graduate schools in the United States. Created and administered by Educational Testing Service in 1949, the exam aims to measure verbal reasoning, quantitative reasoning, analytical writing, and critical thinking skills that have been acquired over a long period of time and that are not related to any specific field of study. The GRE General Test is offered as a computer-based exam administered at Prometric testing centers. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4478 encyclopediacc
Iberian Peninsula
 
30:22
The Iberian Peninsula , commonly called Iberia, is the second largest European peninsula ; it is located in the extreme southwest of the continent. The area is approximately 582,000 km2 . There are three countries in it : Spain, Portugal, Andorra, as well as a part of France and the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3621 encyclopediacc
Mary McLeod Bethune
 
28:01
Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a private school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida. She attracted donations of time and money, and developed the academic school as a college. It later continued to develop as Bethune-Cookman University. She also was appointed as a national adviser to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. She was known as "The First Lady of The Struggle" because of her commitment to bettering African Americans. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3764 encyclopediacc
Sierra Leone
 
01:40:53
Sierra Leone , officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa that is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. Sierra Leone is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and a unicameral legislature. The country has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savannah to rainforests. The country covers a total area of 71,740 km2 and with an estimated population of 6 million . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 5491 encyclopediacc
Garrett Morgan
 
11:16
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. was an African American inventor and community leader. His most notable inventions included a type of protective respiratory hood , a traffic signal, and a hair-straightening preparation. He is renowned for a heroic rescue in 1916 in which he and three others used the safety hood device he'd developed to save workers trapped within a water intake tunnel, fifty feet beneath Lake Erie. He is also credited as the first African American in Cleveland, Ohio, to own an automobile. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 11140 encyclopediacc
Cameron Mitchell (actor)
 
05:22
Cameron Mitchell was an American film, television and Broadway actor with close ties to one of Canada's most successful families, and considered, by Lee Strasberg, to be one of the founding members of The Actor's Studio in New York City. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1771 encyclopediacc
Nat Turner
 
17:59
Nat Turner was an African-American slave who led a slave rebellion in Virginia on August 21, 1831 that resulted in 55 white deaths. Whites responded with at least 200 black deaths. He gathered supporters in Southampton County, Virginia. Turner was convicted, sentenced to death, and hanged. In the aftermath, the state executed 56 blacks accused of being part of Turner's slave rebellion. Two hundred blacks were also killed after being beaten by white militias and mobs reacting with violence. Across Virginia and other southern states, state legislators passed new laws prohibiting education of slaves and free blacks, restricting rights of assembly and other civil rights for free blacks, and requiring white ministers to be present at black worship services. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3079 encyclopediacc
Subsidiary
 
09:19
A subsidiary, subsidiary company, daughter company, or sister company is a company that is completely or partly owned by another corporation that owns more than half of the subsidiary's stock, and which normally acts as a holding corporation which at least partly or a parent corporation, wholly controls the activities and policies of the daughter corporation. The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. The controlling entity is called its parent company, parent, or holding company. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 4354 encyclopediacc
Bill of lading
 
09:07
A Bill of Lading is a document issued by a carrier to a shipper of goods. It is a negotiable instrument, and it serves three purposes: it is a receipt for the goods shipped; it evidences the contract of carriage; and it serves as a document of title . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 17240 encyclopediacc
Gangrene
 
10:11
Gangrene is a potentially life-threatening condition that arises when a considerable mass of body tissue dies . This may occur after an injury or infection, or in people suffering from any chronic health problem affecting blood circulation. The primary cause of gangrene is reduced blood supply to the affected tissues, which results in cell death. Diabetes and long-term smoking increase the risk of suffering from gangrene. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 19049 encyclopediacc
Thanksgiving
 
15:05
Thanksgiving Day is a national holiday celebrated primarily in the United States and Canada as a day of giving thanks for the blessing of the harvest and of the preceding year. Several other places around the world observe similar celebrations. It is celebrated on the fourth Thursday of November in the United States and on the second Monday of October in Canada. Thanksgiving has its historical roots in religious and cultural traditions, and has long been celebrated in a secular manner as well. History Prayers of thanks and special thanksgiving ceremonies are common among almost all religions after harvests and at other times. The Thanksgiving holiday's history in North America is rooted in English traditions dating from the Protestant Reformation. It also has aspects of a harvest festival, even though the harvest in New England occurs well before the late-November date on which the modern Thanksgiving holiday is celebrated. In the English tradition, days of thanksgiving and special thanksgiving religious services became important during the English Reformation in the reign of Henry VIII and in reaction to the large number of religious holidays on the Catholic calendar. Before 1536 there were 95 Church holidays, plus 52 Sundays, when people were required to attend church and forego work and sometimes pay for expensive celebrations. The 1536 reforms reduced the number of Church holidays to 27, but some Puritans, the radical reformers of their age, wished to completely eliminate all Church holidays, including Christmas and Easter. The holidays were to be replaced by specially called Days of Fasting or Days of Thanksgiving, in response to events that the Puritans viewed as acts of special providence. Unexpected disasters or threats of judgement from on high called for Days of Fasting. Special blessings, viewed as coming from God, called for Days of Thanksgiving. For example, Days of Fasting were called on account of drought in 1611, floods in 1613, and plagues in 1604 and 1622. Days of Thanksgiving were called following the victory over the Spanish Armada in 1588 and following the deliverance of Queen Anne in 1705. An unusual annual Day of Thanksgiving began in 1606 following the failure of the Gunpowder Plot in 1605 and developed into Guy Fawkes Day. In Canada While some researchers state that "there is no compelling narrative of the origins of the Canadian Thanksgiving day", the first Canadian Thanksgiving is often traced back to 1578 and the explorer Martin Frobisher. Frobisher, who had been trying to find a northern passage to the Pacific Ocean, held his Thanksgiving celebration not for harvest but in thanks for surviving the long journey from England through the perils of storms and icebergs. On his third and final voyage to the far north, Frobisher held a formal ceremony in Frobisher Bay in Baffin Island (present-day Nunavut) to give thanks to God and in a service ministered by the preacher Robert Wolfall they celebrated Communion. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 324 encyclopediacc
Erwin Rommel
 
01:41:27
Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel , popularly known as the Desert Fox ), was a German field marshal of World War II. He earned the respect of both his own troops and his enemies. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3696 encyclopediacc
Ernst & Young
 
18:16
Ernst & Young is a multinational professional services firm headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It was the third largest professional services firm in the world by aggregated revenue in 2012 and is one of the "Big Four" accounting firms. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1730 encyclopediacc
Theodore Shackley
 
11:01
Theodore G. "Ted" Shackley, Jr. was an American CIA officer involved in many important and controversial CIA operations during the 1960s and 1970s. He is one of the most decorated CIA officers. He was commonly known as the "Blond Ghost" due to his dislike of being photographed. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1245 encyclopediacc
Addison's disease
 
20:51
Addison's disease is a rare, chronic endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce sufficient steroid hormones . It is characterised by a number of relatively nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal pain and weakness, but under certain circumstances, these may progress to Addisonian crisis, a severe illness which may include very low blood pressure and coma. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2445 encyclopediacc
Métis people (Canada)
 
27:38
The Métis are one of the recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. They trace their descent to mixed First Nations and European heritage. The term was historically a catch-all describing the offspring of any such union, but within generations the culture syncretised into what is today a distinct aboriginal group, with formal recognition equal to that of the Inuit and First Nations. Mothers were often Cree, Ojibwe, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Menominee, Mi'kmaq or Maliseet. At one time there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis or Countryborn descended from English or Scottish fathers. Today these two cultures have essentially coalesced into one Métis tradition. Other former names—many of which are now considered to be offensive—include Bois-Brûlés, Mixed-bloods, Half-breeds, Bungi, Black Scots and Jackatars. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 6127 encyclopediacc
Ricky Wilson (British musician)
 
03:06
Charles Richard "Ricky" Wilson is the lead singer of English band Kaiser Chiefs, a five piece band from Menston and Guiseley in Leeds, West Yorkshire. Their successful songs include "Ruby", "I Predict a Riot", "Never Miss a Beat", "Oh My God" and "Everyday I Love You Less and Less". Before the formation of the Kaiser Chiefs in 1996, Wilson was a member of the band Runston Parva (later known as Parva). On 19 September 2013, Wilson was confirmed as a coach on The Voice UK. Early life and career Wilson was born in Keighley, West Yorkshire. He attended Leeds Boys Grammar School and was in Smeaton house and Ghyll Royd for primary school. During the early days of Kaiser Chiefs, Wilson was well known for wearing stripy blazers, waistcoats, turn-up jeans and winkle picker shoes, a style that won him the Shockwaves NME Award For Best Dressed Person in 2006. Lately, he has adopted a more casual dress code. Wilson is well known for his energetic stage presence, climbing scaffolding, standing on the safety barrier and at times crowd surfing. Of crowd surfing, Wilson says he likes to "get out and see the crowd, see what they smell like". Such exploits have occasionally resulted in injury, such as torn ankle ligaments after jumping off stage during a concert in Portugal. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1943 encyclopediacc
Victor Hugo
 
33:46
Victor Marie Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He is considered one of the greatest and best known French writers. In France, Hugo's literary fame comes first from his poetry but also rests upon his novels and his dramatic achievements. Among many volumes of poetry, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2915 encyclopediacc
Blackie Dammett
 
03:54
John Michael Kiedis , better known by his stage name, "Blackie Dammett" is an American actor, author and father of Anthony Kiedis, lead singer of Red Hot Chili Peppers. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 794 encyclopediacc
John Maynard Keynes
 
01:04:24
John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB, FBA was a British economist whose ideas have fundamentally affected the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics, and informed the economic policies of governments. He built on and greatly refined earlier work on the causes of business cycles, and is widely considered to be one of the founders of modern macroeconomics and the most influential economist of the 20th century. His ideas are the basis for the school of thought known as Keynesian economics, and its various offshoots. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3136 encyclopediacc
George Bernard Shaw
 
52:31
George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama, and he wrote more than 60 plays. He was also an essayist, novelist and short story writer. Nearly all his writings address prevailing social problems, but have a vein of comedy which makes their stark themes more palatable. Issues which engaged Shaw's attention included education, marriage, religion, government, health care, and class privilege. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 13929 encyclopediacc
Neurosis
 
06:55
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations, whereby behavior is not outside socially acceptable norms. It is also known as psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder, and thus those suffering from it are said to be neurotic. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 6057 encyclopediacc
HSBC
 
39:11
HSBC Holdings plc is a British multinational banking and financial services company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is one of the world's largest banks. It was founded in London in 1991 by the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation to act as a new group holding company. The origins of the bank lie in Hong Kong and Shanghai, where branches were first opened in 1865. The HSBC name is derived from the initials of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. As such, the company refers to both the United Kingdom and Hong Kong as its "home markets". This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 7737 encyclopediacc
List of countries where Spanish is an official language
 
03:03
The following is a list of sovereign states and dependent territories where Spanish is an official language, the national language or the de facto official language. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 533 encyclopediacc
Sami people
 
01:35:33
The Sami people, also spelled Sámi or Saami, are the indigenous Finno-Ugric people inhabiting the Arctic area of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of far northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, the Kola Peninsula of Russia, and the border area between south and middle Sweden and Norway. The Sámi are the only indigenous people of Scandinavia recognized and protected under the international conventions of indigenous peoples, and are hence the northernmost indigenous people of Europe. Sami ancestral lands span an area of approximately 388,350 km2 , which is approximately the size of Norway, in the Nordic countries. Their traditional languages are the Sami languages and are classified as a branch of the Uralic language family. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2472 encyclopediacc
Counties of England
 
17:38
Counties of England are areas used for the purposes of administrative, geographical and political demarcation. For administrative purposes, England outside Greater London and the Isles of Scilly is divided into 83 counties. The counties may consist of a single district or be divided into several districts. As of April 2009, 27 of these counties are divided into districts and have a county council. Six of the counties, covering the major conurbations, are known as metropolitan counties, which do not have county councils, although some functions are organised on a county-wide basis by the lower-tier districts acting jointly. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2285 encyclopediacc
Pleurisy
 
23:33
Pleurisy is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining surrounding the lungs. There are many possible causes of pleurisy but viral infections spreading from the lungs to pleural cavity are the most common. The inflamed pleural layers rub against each other every time the lungs expand to breathe in air. This can cause sharp pain when breathing, also called pleuritic chest pain. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 13233 encyclopediacc
Elijah McCoy
 
10:19
Elijah J. McCoy was a black Canadian-American inventor and engineer, who was notable for his 57 U.S. patents, most to do with lubrication of steam engines. Born free in Canada, he returned as a five-year-old child with his family to the United States in 1847, where he lived for the rest of his life and became a US citizen. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3423 encyclopediacc
Cicero
 
42:17
Marcus Tullius Cicero , was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 7390 encyclopediacc
Human factors and ergonomics
 
30:27
Human factors and ergonomics is a multidisciplinary field incorporating contributions from psychology, engineering, biomechanics, mechanobiology, industrial design, physiology and anthropometry. In essence it is the study of designing equipment and devices that fit the human body and its cognitive abilities. The two terms "human factors" and "ergonomics" are essentially synonymous. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 6164 encyclopediacc
Cherokee
 
01:08:17
The Cherokee are a Native American people historically settled in the Southeastern United States . They speak an Iroquoian language. In the 19th century, historians and ethnographers recorded their oral tradition that told of the tribe having migrated south in ancient times from the Great Lakes region, where other Iroquoian-speaking peoples were. They began to have contact with European traders in the 18th century. American colonist, Henry Timberlake, described the Cherokee nation as he saw it in 1761: This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1466 encyclopediacc
Werner Heisenberg
 
01:14:29
Werner Karl Heisenberg was a German theoretical physicist and one of the key creators of quantum mechanics. He published his work in 1925 in a breakthrough paper. In the subsequent series of papers with Max Born and Pascual Jordan, during the same year, this matrix formulation of quantum mechanics was substantially elaborated. In 1927 he published his uncertainty principle, upon which he built his philosophy and for which he is best known. Heisenberg was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1932 "for the creation of quantum mechanics". He also made important contributions to the theories of the hydrodynamics of turbulent flows, the atomic nucleus, ferromagnetism, cosmic rays, and subatomic particles, and he was instrumental in planning the first West German nuclear reactor at Karlsruhe, together with a research reactor in Munich, in 1957. Considerable controversy surrounds his work on atomic research during World War II. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 10629 encyclopediacc
Chief operating officer
 
21:22
A Chief Operating Officer or Director of Operations can be one of the highest-ranking executives in an organization and comprises part of the "C-Suite". The COO is responsible for the daily operation of the company, and routinely reports to the highest ranking executive, usually the Chief executive officer . The COO may also carry the title of President which makes that person the second in command at the firm, especially if the highest ranking executive is the Chairman and CEO. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 8888 encyclopediacc
Rajat Tokas
 
01:38
Rajat Tokas is an Indian television actor. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 1797 encyclopediacc
Victoria Summer
 
02:12
Victoria Summer is an English singer, songwriter, model and actress. After beginning her career in horror films Summer transitioned into more mainstream roles starting with the Brian Herzlinger film How Sweet It Is. She played Julie Andrews in Saving Mr. Banks, a 2013 film about the making of Mary Poppins. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 135 encyclopediacc
Archaea
 
43:32
The Archaea are a domain or kingdom of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes are prokaryotes, meaning they have no cell nucleus or any other membrane-bound organelles in their cells. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4397 encyclopediacc
Geoffrey Chaucer
 
41:05
Geoffrey Chaucer , known as the Father of English literature, is widely considered the greatest English poet of the Middle Ages and was the first poet to have been buried in Poet's Corner of Westminster Abbey. While he achieved fame during his lifetime as an author, philosopher, alchemist and astronomer, composing a scientific treatise on the astrolabe for his ten year-old son Lewis, Chaucer also maintained an active career in the civil service as a bureaucrat, courtier and diplomat. Among his many works, which include The Book of the Duchess, the House of Fame, the Legend of Good Women and Troilus and Criseyde, he is best known today for The Canterbury Tales. Chaucer is a crucial figure in developing the legitimacy of the vernacular, Middle English, at a time when the dominant literary languages in England were French and Latin. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4141 encyclopediacc
Ethylene glycol
 
13:55
Ethylene glycol is an organic compound primarily used as a raw material in the manufacture of polyester fibers and fabric industry, and polyethylene terephthalate resins used in bottling. A small percent is also used in industrial applications like antifreeze formulations and other industrial products. It is an odorless, colorless, syrupy, sweet-tasting liquid. Ethylene glycol is only weakly toxic, but cases of poisonings are not uncommon. Very small amounts of ingested antifreeze can be fatal. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2098 encyclopediacc
Eddie Guerrero
 
58:13
Eduardo Gory "Eddie" Guerrero Llanes was an American professional wrestler born into the Guerrero wrestling family. He wrestled in Mexico and Japan for several major professional wrestling promotions. In the United States, Guerrero wrestled in Extreme Championship Wrestling , World Championship Wrestling , and in World Wrestling Entertainment . Guerrero's gimmick was that of "Latino Heat", a crafty, resourceful wrestler who would do anything to win a match. His catchphrase became "I Lie! I Cheat! I Steal!," which was used in one of his entrance themes. Guerrero partly used this phrase in his autobiography Cheating Death, Stealing Life. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1753 encyclopediacc
European Economic Area
 
18:02
The European Economic Area comprises three member states of the European Free Trade Association , and 27 member states of the European Union , with Croatia provisionally applying the agreement pending its ratification by all EEA countries. It was established on 1 January 1994 following an agreement with the European Community . It allows the EFTA-EEA states to participate in the EU's Internal Market without being members of the EU. They adopt almost all EU legislation related to the single market, except laws on agriculture and fisheries. However they also contribute to and influence the formation of new EEA relevant policies and legislation at an early stage as part of a formal decision-shaping process. In addition, independence and direct membership of international bodies in their own right means the countries are able to participate in and become signatories to various conventions, such as the Basel Convention of 1992, that are only adopted by the EU many years later . One EFTA member, Switzerland, has not joined the EEA but has a series of bilateral agreements, including a free trade agreement, with the EU. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2605 encyclopediacc
Pulmonary edema
 
09:46
Pulmonary edema , or oedema , is fluid accumulation in the air spaces and parenchyma of the lungs. It leads to impaired gas exchange and may cause respiratory failure. It is due to either failure of the left ventricle of the heart to adequately remove blood from the pulmonary circulation , or an injury to the lung parenchyma or vasculature of the lung . Treatment is focused on three aspects: firstly improving respiratory function, secondly, treating the underlying cause, and thirdly avoiding further damage to the lung. Pulmonary edema, especially in the acute setting, can lead to respiratory distress, cardiac arrest due to hypoxia, and death. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 13557 encyclopediacc
Soni Razdan
 
02:08
Soni Razdan is a British-born Indian actress and film director. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2608 encyclopediacc
Frank Serpico
 
10:46
Francesco Vincent Serpico is a retired American New York City Police Department officer who is most famous for blowing the whistle on police corruption in the late 1960s and early 1970s—an act of valor that compelled Mayor John V. Lindsay to appoint the landmark Knapp Commission to investigate the NYPD. Most of Serpico's fame came after the release of the 1973 film Serpico, which starred Al Pacino in the title role in which Al Pacino was nominated for an Oscar. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 557 encyclopediacc

Makeup artist resume for mac
Seagate crystal report writer
Developing quality dissertations in the sciences
Teamlease labour report 2019
Pub annual report 2019