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Videos uploaded by user “encyclopediacc”
Brooks's law
 
05:21
Brooks's law is a principle in software development which says that "adding manpower to a late software project makes it later." It was coined by Fred Brooks in his 1975 book The Mythical Man-Month. The corollary of Brooks's Law is that there is an incremental person who, when added to a project, makes it take more, not less time. Brooks adds that "Nine women can't make a baby in one month." This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 2248 encyclopediacc
Charles Vane
 
10:59
Charles Vane was an English pirate who preyed upon English and French shipping. His pirate career lasted from 1716 to 1719. His flagship was a brigantine named the Ranger. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4083 encyclopediacc
World Health Organization
 
37:33
The World Health Organization is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, with its headquarters in Geneva, Switzerland. WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations. The main responsibility was to help anybody in need of medical assistance. The constitution of the World Health Organization had been signed by all 69 countries of the United Nations by 22 July 1946, with the first meeting of the World Health Assembly finishing on 24 July 1948. It incorporated the Office International d'Hygiène Publique and the League of Nations Health Organization. Since its creation, it has played a leading role in the eradication of smallpox. Its current priorities include communicable diseases, in particular, HIV/AIDS, malaria and tuberculosis; the mitigation of the effects of non-communicable diseases; sexual and reproductive health, development, and aging; nutrition, food security and healthy eating; occupational health; substance abuse; and drive the development of reporting, publications, and networking. WHO is responsible for the World Health Report, a leading international publication on health, the worldwide World Health Survey, and World Health Day . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 15364 encyclopediacc
Public administration
 
33:46
Public administration refers to two meanings: first, it is concerned with the implementation of government policy; second, it is an academic discipline that studies this implementation and prepares civil servants for working in the public service. As a "field of inquiry with a diverse scope" its "fundamental goal... is to advance management and policies so that government can function." Some of the various definitions which have been offered for the term are: "the management of public programs"; the "translation of politics into the reality that citizens see every day"; and "the study of government decision making, the analysis of the policies themselves, the various inputs that have produced them, and the inputs necessary to produce alternative policies." This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 22580 encyclopediacc
Mary McLeod Bethune
 
28:01
Mary Jane McLeod Bethune, was an American educator and civil rights leader best known for starting a private school for African-American students in Daytona Beach, Florida. She attracted donations of time and money, and developed the academic school as a college. It later continued to develop as Bethune-Cookman University. She also was appointed as a national adviser to President Franklin D. Roosevelt. She was known as "The First Lady of The Struggle" because of her commitment to bettering African Americans. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3992 encyclopediacc
Levant
 
07:09
The Levant , also known as the Eastern Mediterranean, is a geographic and cultural region consisting of the "eastern Mediterranean littoral between Anatolia and Egypt". The Levant today consists of the island of Cyprus, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Palestine, and part of southern Turkey . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3235 encyclopediacc
Sierra Leone
 
01:40:53
Sierra Leone , officially the Republic of Sierra Leone, is a country in West Africa that is bordered by Guinea to the northeast, Liberia to the southeast, and the Atlantic Ocean to the southwest. Sierra Leone is a constitutional republic with a directly elected president and a unicameral legislature. The country has a tropical climate, with a diverse environment ranging from savannah to rainforests. The country covers a total area of 71,740 km2 and with an estimated population of 6 million . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 5975 encyclopediacc
Theodore Shackley
 
11:01
Theodore G. "Ted" Shackley, Jr. was an American CIA officer involved in many important and controversial CIA operations during the 1960s and 1970s. He is one of the most decorated CIA officers. He was commonly known as the "Blond Ghost" due to his dislike of being photographed. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1295 encyclopediacc
Cameron Mitchell (actor)
 
05:22
Cameron Mitchell was an American film, television and Broadway actor with close ties to one of Canada's most successful families, and considered, by Lee Strasberg, to be one of the founding members of The Actor's Studio in New York City. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1939 encyclopediacc
Iberian Peninsula
 
30:22
The Iberian Peninsula , commonly called Iberia, is the second largest European peninsula ; it is located in the extreme southwest of the continent. The area is approximately 582,000 km2 . There are three countries in it : Spain, Portugal, Andorra, as well as a part of France and the British Overseas Territory of Gibraltar. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3677 encyclopediacc
Paresthesia
 
06:36
Paresthesia , is a sensation of tingling, tickling, prickling, pricking, or burning of a person's skin with no apparent long-term physical effect. The manifestation of a paresthesia may be transient or chronic. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 3552 encyclopediacc
Bill of lading
 
09:07
A Bill of Lading is a document issued by a carrier to a shipper of goods. It is a negotiable instrument, and it serves three purposes: it is a receipt for the goods shipped; it evidences the contract of carriage; and it serves as a document of title . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 17418 encyclopediacc
Elijah McCoy
 
10:19
Elijah J. McCoy was a black Canadian-American inventor and engineer, who was notable for his 57 U.S. patents, most to do with lubrication of steam engines. Born free in Canada, he returned as a five-year-old child with his family to the United States in 1847, where he lived for the rest of his life and became a US citizen. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3891 encyclopediacc
Subsidiary
 
09:19
A subsidiary, subsidiary company, daughter company, or sister company is a company that is completely or partly owned by another corporation that owns more than half of the subsidiary's stock, and which normally acts as a holding corporation which at least partly or a parent corporation, wholly controls the activities and policies of the daughter corporation. The subsidiary can be a company, corporation, or limited liability company. In some cases it is a government or state-owned enterprise. The controlling entity is called its parent company, parent, or holding company. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 4424 encyclopediacc
Gangrene
 
10:11
Gangrene is a potentially life-threatening condition that arises when a considerable mass of body tissue dies . This may occur after an injury or infection, or in people suffering from any chronic health problem affecting blood circulation. The primary cause of gangrene is reduced blood supply to the affected tissues, which results in cell death. Diabetes and long-term smoking increase the risk of suffering from gangrene. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 19233 encyclopediacc
Sami people
 
01:35:33
The Sami people, also spelled Sámi or Saami, are the indigenous Finno-Ugric people inhabiting the Arctic area of Sápmi, which today encompasses parts of far northern Norway, Sweden, Finland, the Kola Peninsula of Russia, and the border area between south and middle Sweden and Norway. The Sámi are the only indigenous people of Scandinavia recognized and protected under the international conventions of indigenous peoples, and are hence the northernmost indigenous people of Europe. Sami ancestral lands span an area of approximately 388,350 km2 , which is approximately the size of Norway, in the Nordic countries. Their traditional languages are the Sami languages and are classified as a branch of the Uralic language family. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2551 encyclopediacc
Erwin Rommel
 
01:41:27
Erwin Johannes Eugen Rommel , popularly known as the Desert Fox ), was a German field marshal of World War II. He earned the respect of both his own troops and his enemies. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3847 encyclopediacc
George Bernard Shaw
 
52:31
George Bernard Shaw was an Irish playwright and a co-founder of the London School of Economics. Although his first profitable writing was music and literary criticism, in which capacity he wrote many highly articulate pieces of journalism, his main talent was for drama, and he wrote more than 60 plays. He was also an essayist, novelist and short story writer. Nearly all his writings address prevailing social problems, but have a vein of comedy which makes their stark themes more palatable. Issues which engaged Shaw's attention included education, marriage, religion, government, health care, and class privilege. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 14382 encyclopediacc
Métis people (Canada)
 
27:38
The Métis are one of the recognized Aboriginal peoples in Canada. They trace their descent to mixed First Nations and European heritage. The term was historically a catch-all describing the offspring of any such union, but within generations the culture syncretised into what is today a distinct aboriginal group, with formal recognition equal to that of the Inuit and First Nations. Mothers were often Cree, Ojibwe, Algonquin, Saulteaux, Menominee, Mi'kmaq or Maliseet. At one time there was an important distinction between French Métis born of francophone voyageur fathers, and the Anglo-Métis or Countryborn descended from English or Scottish fathers. Today these two cultures have essentially coalesced into one Métis tradition. Other former names—many of which are now considered to be offensive—include Bois-Brûlés, Mixed-bloods, Half-breeds, Bungi, Black Scots and Jackatars. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 6460 encyclopediacc
HSBC
 
39:11
HSBC Holdings plc is a British multinational banking and financial services company headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It is one of the world's largest banks. It was founded in London in 1991 by the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation to act as a new group holding company. The origins of the bank lie in Hong Kong and Shanghai, where branches were first opened in 1865. The HSBC name is derived from the initials of the Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation. As such, the company refers to both the United Kingdom and Hong Kong as its "home markets". This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 8029 encyclopediacc
Ernst & Young
 
18:16
Ernst & Young is a multinational professional services firm headquartered in London, United Kingdom. It was the third largest professional services firm in the world by aggregated revenue in 2012 and is one of the "Big Four" accounting firms. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1766 encyclopediacc
Carter G. Woodson
 
17:15
Carter Godwin Woodson was an African-American historian, author, journalist and the founder of the Association for the Study of African American Life and History. Woodson was one of the first scholars to study African-American history. A founder of Journal of Negro History, Woodson has been cited as the father of black history. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3723 encyclopediacc
Santiago Cabrera
 
03:33
Santiago Cabrera is a Venezuelan-born Chilean British actor, most known for his role as the character Isaac Mendez in the television series Heroes and as Lancelot in the BBC drama series Merlin. He was brought up in several countries including England, and he currently resides in London. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 301 encyclopediacc
Garrett Morgan
 
11:16
Garrett Augustus Morgan, Sr. was an African American inventor and community leader. His most notable inventions included a type of protective respiratory hood , a traffic signal, and a hair-straightening preparation. He is renowned for a heroic rescue in 1916 in which he and three others used the safety hood device he'd developed to save workers trapped within a water intake tunnel, fifty feet beneath Lake Erie. He is also credited as the first African American in Cleveland, Ohio, to own an automobile. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 12017 encyclopediacc
Chief operating officer
 
21:22
A Chief Operating Officer or Director of Operations can be one of the highest-ranking executives in an organization and comprises part of the "C-Suite". The COO is responsible for the daily operation of the company, and routinely reports to the highest ranking executive, usually the Chief executive officer . The COO may also carry the title of President which makes that person the second in command at the firm, especially if the highest ranking executive is the Chairman and CEO. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 9517 encyclopediacc
History of the Denver Broncos
 
45:35
The history of the Denver Broncos American football club began when the team was chartered a member of the American Football League in 1960. The Broncos have played in the city of Denver, Colorado throughout their entire history. The Broncos did not win any titles as members of the AFL. Since the 1970 AFL--NFL merger, the Broncos have won 12 division titles, and played in seven Super Bowls, following the 1977, 1986, 1987, 1989, 1997, 1998, and 2013 seasons. They won Super Bowl XXXII and Super Bowl XXXIII. Their most famous player is former quarterback John Elway, starting quarterback in five Super Bowls and holder of many NFL records. The Broncos currently play in the National Football League's AFC West division. Their current leadership includes owner Pat Bowlen, head coach John Fox, Vice President John Elway and quarterback Peyton Manning. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3168 encyclopediacc
Neurosis
 
06:55
Neurosis is a class of functional mental disorders involving distress but neither delusions nor hallucinations, whereby behavior is not outside socially acceptable norms. It is also known as psychoneurosis or neurotic disorder, and thus those suffering from it are said to be neurotic. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 6369 encyclopediacc
Cherokee
 
01:08:17
The Cherokee are a Native American people historically settled in the Southeastern United States . They speak an Iroquoian language. In the 19th century, historians and ethnographers recorded their oral tradition that told of the tribe having migrated south in ancient times from the Great Lakes region, where other Iroquoian-speaking peoples were. They began to have contact with European traders in the 18th century. American colonist, Henry Timberlake, described the Cherokee nation as he saw it in 1761: This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1578 encyclopediacc
Pleurisy
 
23:33
Pleurisy is an inflammation of the pleura, the lining surrounding the lungs. There are many possible causes of pleurisy but viral infections spreading from the lungs to pleural cavity are the most common. The inflamed pleural layers rub against each other every time the lungs expand to breathe in air. This can cause sharp pain when breathing, also called pleuritic chest pain. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 13566 encyclopediacc
Cicero
 
42:19
Marcus Tullius Cicero , was a Roman philosopher, politician, lawyer, orator, political theorist, consul and constitutionalist. He came from a wealthy municipal family of the Roman equestrian order, and is widely considered one of Rome's greatest orators and prose stylists. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 7537 encyclopediacc
Werner Heisenberg
 
01:14:29
Werner Karl Heisenberg was a German theoretical physicist and one of the key creators of quantum mechanics. He published his work in 1925 in a breakthrough paper. In the subsequent series of papers with Max Born and Pascual Jordan, during the same year, this matrix formulation of quantum mechanics was substantially elaborated. In 1927 he published his uncertainty principle, upon which he built his philosophy and for which he is best known. Heisenberg was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics for 1932 "for the creation of quantum mechanics". He also made important contributions to the theories of the hydrodynamics of turbulent flows, the atomic nucleus, ferromagnetism, cosmic rays, and subatomic particles, and he was instrumental in planning the first West German nuclear reactor at Karlsruhe, together with a research reactor in Munich, in 1957. Considerable controversy surrounds his work on atomic research during World War II. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 10821 encyclopediacc
Victor Hugo
 
33:46
Victor Marie Hugo was a French poet, novelist, and dramatist of the Romantic movement. He is considered one of the greatest and best known French writers. In France, Hugo's literary fame comes first from his poetry but also rests upon his novels and his dramatic achievements. Among many volumes of poetry, Les Contemplations and La Légende des siècles stand particularly high in critical esteem. Outside France, his best-known works are the novels Les Misérables, 1862, and Notre-Dame de Paris, 1831 . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3110 encyclopediacc
Archaea
 
43:32
The Archaea are a domain or kingdom of single-celled microorganisms. These microbes are prokaryotes, meaning they have no cell nucleus or any other membrane-bound organelles in their cells. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 4575 encyclopediacc
List of countries where Spanish is an official language
 
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The following is a list of sovereign states and dependent territories where Spanish is an official language, the national language or the de facto official language. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 557 encyclopediacc
Phoenix (mythology)
 
04:49
In Greek mythology, a phoenix or phenix is a long-lived bird that is cyclically regenerated or reborn. Associated with the sun, a phoenix obtains new life by arising from the ashes of its predecessor. The phoenix was subsequently adopted as a symbol in Early Christianity. While the phoenix typically dies by fire in most versions of the legend, there are less popular versions of the myth in which the mythical bird dies and simply decomposes before being born again. Herodotus, Lucan, Pliny the Elder, Pope Clement I, Lactantius, Ovid, and Isidore of Seville are among those who have contributed to the retelling and transmission of the phoenix motif. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 614 encyclopediacc
Addison's disease
 
20:51
Addison's disease is a rare, chronic endocrine disorder in which the adrenal glands do not produce sufficient steroid hormones . It is characterised by a number of relatively nonspecific symptoms, such as abdominal pain and weakness, but under certain circumstances, these may progress to Addisonian crisis, a severe illness which may include very low blood pressure and coma. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2479 encyclopediacc
John Maynard Keynes
 
01:04:24
John Maynard Keynes, 1st Baron Keynes, CB, FBA was a British economist whose ideas have fundamentally affected the theory and practice of modern macroeconomics, and informed the economic policies of governments. He built on and greatly refined earlier work on the causes of business cycles, and is widely considered to be one of the founders of modern macroeconomics and the most influential economist of the 20th century. His ideas are the basis for the school of thought known as Keynesian economics, and its various offshoots. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3189 encyclopediacc
Charles R. Drew
 
07:43
Charles Richard Drew was an American physician, surgeon, and medical researcher. He researched in the field of blood transfusions, developing improved techniques for blood storage, and applied his expert knowledge to developing large-scale blood banks early in World War II. This allowed medics to save thousands of lives of the Allied forces. The research and development aspect of his blood storage work is disputed. As the most prominent African-American in the field, Drew protested against the practice of racial segregation in the donation of blood, as it lacked scientific foundation, an action which cost him his job. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 661 encyclopediacc
Ethylene glycol
 
13:55
Ethylene glycol is an organic compound primarily used as a raw material in the manufacture of polyester fibers and fabric industry, and polyethylene terephthalate resins used in bottling. A small percent is also used in industrial applications like antifreeze formulations and other industrial products. It is an odorless, colorless, syrupy, sweet-tasting liquid. Ethylene glycol is only weakly toxic, but cases of poisonings are not uncommon. Very small amounts of ingested antifreeze can be fatal. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 2161 encyclopediacc
Cellulitis
 
10:55
Cellulitis is a bacterial infection involving the skin. It specifically affects the dermis and subcutaneous fat. Signs and symptoms include a area of redness which increases in size over a couple of days. The borders of the area of redness are generally not sharp and the skin may be swollen. While the redness often turns white when pressure is applied this is not always the case. The area of infection is usually painful. Lymphatic vessels may occasionally be involved and the person may have a fever and fell tiered. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 449 encyclopediacc
Phosphoric acid
 
19:28
Phosphoric acid acid) is a mineral acid having the chemical formula H3PO4. Orthophosphoric acid molecules can combine with themselves to form a variety of compounds which are also referred to as phosphoric acids, but in a more general way. The term phosphoric acid can also refer to a chemical or reagent consisting of phosphoric acids, such as pyrophosphoric acid or triphosphoric acid, but usually orthophosphoric acid. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1880 encyclopediacc
Human factors and ergonomics
 
30:27
Human factors and ergonomics is a multidisciplinary field incorporating contributions from psychology, engineering, biomechanics, mechanobiology, industrial design, physiology and anthropometry. In essence it is the study of designing equipment and devices that fit the human body and its cognitive abilities. The two terms "human factors" and "ergonomics" are essentially synonymous. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 6245 encyclopediacc
Counties of England
 
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Counties of England are areas used for the purposes of administrative, geographical and political demarcation. For administrative purposes, England outside Greater London and the Isles of Scilly is divided into 83 counties. The counties may consist of a single district or be divided into several districts. As of April 2009, 27 of these counties are divided into districts and have a county council. Six of the counties, covering the major conurbations, are known as metropolitan counties, which do not have county councils, although some functions are organised on a county-wide basis by the lower-tier districts acting jointly. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2333 encyclopediacc
Hasnat Khan
 
03:14
Hasnat Ahmad Khan, FRCS is a British Pakistani heart and lung surgeon. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA
Views: 2817 encyclopediacc
John Dalton
 
21:41
John Dalton FRS was an English chemist, meteorologist and physicist. He is best known for his pioneering work in the development of modern atomic theory, and his research into colour blindness . This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 941 encyclopediacc
Pulmonary edema
 
09:46
Pulmonary edema , or oedema , is fluid accumulation in the air spaces and parenchyma of the lungs. It leads to impaired gas exchange and may cause respiratory failure. It is due to either failure of the left ventricle of the heart to adequately remove blood from the pulmonary circulation , or an injury to the lung parenchyma or vasculature of the lung . Treatment is focused on three aspects: firstly improving respiratory function, secondly, treating the underlying cause, and thirdly avoiding further damage to the lung. Pulmonary edema, especially in the acute setting, can lead to respiratory distress, cardiac arrest due to hypoxia, and death. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 13850 encyclopediacc
Telugu language
 
25:51
Telugu /ˈtɛlʊɡuː/ is a Dravidian language predominantly spoken in the Indian states of Andhra Pradesh and Telangana, and in Yanam where it is an official language. It is also spoken by significant minorities in the states Chhattisgarh, Karnataka, Maharashtra, Odisha, Tamil Nadu, the union territory Puducherry, and by the Sri Lankan Gypsy people. It is one of six languages designated a classical language of India. Telugu ranks third by the number of native speakers in India , thirteenth in the Ethnologue list of most-spoken languages worldwide and is the most widely spoken Dravidian language. It is one of the twenty-two scheduled languages of the Republic of India. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 4811 encyclopediacc
Flag of Sri Lanka
 
03:59
The flag of Sri Lanka, also called the Lion Flag, consists of a gold lion, holding a kastane sword in its right fore paw, in front of a dark red background with four golden bo leaves, one in each corner. Around the background is a yellow border, and to its left are 2 vertical stripes of equal size in green and saffron, with the saffron stripe closest to the lion. The lion represents the Sinhalese ethnicity and the bravery of the Sri Lankan nation while the four Bo leaves represent Mettā, Karuna, Mudita and Upekkha. The orange stripe represents the Sri Lankan Tamils, the green stripe represents Sri Lankan Moors, and the maroon background represents the majority Sinhalese, like the lion. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 3758 encyclopediacc
Food guide pyramid
 
13:43
A food guide pyramid is a pyramid shaped guide of healthy foods divided into sections to show the recommended intake for each food group. The first food pyramid was published in Sweden in 1974. The most widely known food pyramid was introduced by the United States Department of Agriculture in the year 1992, was updated in 2005, and then replaced in 2011. Over 25 other countries and organisations have also published food pyramids. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 104 encyclopediacc
Granuloma
 
12:38
Granuloma is an inflammation found in many diseases. It is a collection of immune cells known as macrophages. Granulomas form when the immune system attempts to wall off substances that it perceives as foreign but is unable to eliminate. Such substances include infectious organisms such as bacteria and fungi as well as other materials such as keratin and suture fragments. The adjective granulomatous means characterized by granulomas. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 28477 encyclopediacc