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History The Gold Rush Documentary
 
55:28
Gold is a chemical element with the symbol Au and atomic number 79. It is a dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal with an attractive, bright yellow color. Valuable Documentary,Need to Know,documentary,documentary videos,salutary documentaries,documentaries,ufo documentary,education documentary,history documenta. the history and secrets of gold - finance wealth money (documentary). thanks for watching history life discovery science technology tech learning education n. An amazing National Geographic Documentary on the myth of the lost Nazi Gold. A trip into the Nazi underground. tags: national geographic, national geographi.
Views: 125179 Documentary Stock
How to Use the California Gold Rush Story Map
 
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How to use the California Gold Rush Story Map developed by the California Geographic Alliance as part of the California Atlas 2.0 project.
Mining Truck Turntable - Callcorr Australia
 
00:32
http://callcorr.com.au/mining-turntable.html With 25 years' experience ATC is now delivering turntable solutions to the Mining Industry globally. Through our commitment to Quality (ISO Accredited) and Innovation, ATC have achieved a world class reputation for the design, manufacture & installation of high quality mechanical rotating solutions which in turn provide substantial benefits to an operation and process.
Simulations of BDCP Impact on Delta Communities
 
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The Delta Protection Commission (DPC) commissioned this visual simulation to better understand the impacts of BDCP tunnel construction on Delta communities and to communicate these impacts to the public. This simulation has been produced by a visualization specialist using information and data presented in the BDCP and DEIR/EIS and is an attempt to be as accurate as possible based on the information provided in these documents. Since DPC is not the project proponent, the project proponent is in the best position to produce the most concise simulation. DPC staff provided information to the project visualization specialist on site footprints, construction footprints, and cofferdam extension into the river from the BDCP and DEIR/EIS. Photographs of the Freeport Water Intake construction process were also used to inform the computer models.
Views: 8608 David Alan Vasquez
Tom and Gwen Conway Experienced Real Estate Agents
 
00:52
Tom and Gwen Conway Experienced Real Estate Agents Tom & Gwen Conway 916.786.7653 www.ShowMeHomes.com Granite Bay's roots lead back to the early 1850's, when gold miners first settled the banks of the American River. According to retired Park Ranger Dave McGrath there were 37 gold mining settlements along both sides of the River. In its earliest beginnings, it was known as "Granite Bar", a small mining camp just below Horseshoe Bar. The North Fork Ditch, built by the Natoma Company between 1852 and 1954, not only allowed miners to surface mine gold, it continued to supply water to the area and attracted settlers who planted olive and almond orchards. When the lake is low you can still find rows of stumps straight out from the Granite Bay boat launch ramp. Remains of the ditch can still be seen in places along the trail leading up the lake from Horseshoe Bar and along the water's edge above the dam at low lake level. The sides of the ditch were concreted in 1925, which has helped to preserve its visibility. Vivian Rasmussen recalled that what was is now called Auburn-Folsom Road was originally called Auburn-Sacramento Road. The road was built in 1850 to allow miners to travel back and forth with supplies. Whiskey Bar, Horseshoe Bar, and Rattlesnake Bar Roads were all established to connect the various settlements to the bar or to the main road. Granite Bar, later to be known as Granite Bay was named for the granite rock quarried from its banks and used as rip-rap in the wing dams of Folsom Dam. Cattle ranchers also took advantage of availability of water and grassy slopes. "There were two major cattle ranges when I moved here in 1956" stated H.T.Newberry, a resident of Skyway. Mooney was one and Grant Bender was the other. "A big chunk of their property was condemned by the government so they could fill the lake" he explained. The remainder of the ranches were subdivided and sold off to people moving into the area. Granite Bay Vista, an early subdivision by John Mercurio and Louis Gavino, probably helped make the name popular according to Niel Lester, who built a home in the tract with her husband in 1962. Things have changed, naturally said Lester. Douglas Blvd. used to be called Rocky Ridge Road east of Sunrise Blvd.. For most newcomers, Rocky Ridge has no significance since most of the ridge has been demolished with the widening and development along Douglas Blvd. Granite Bay didn't become the official name of the area until July 28, 1987. Until then the expanding housing developments along this section of the lake were just as apt to be referred to as Folsom Lake and were included in Roseville's sphere of influence out to Barton Road for Government Planning purposes. Residents of the area felt the goal and lifestyle of Roseville was not consistent with their own and placed the proposition before the County Board of Supervisors to be recognized as the unincorporated community of Granite Bay. Then Assemblyman, Tim Leslie, issued a proclamentation and with County Supervisor's approval the community became officially known as Granite Bay. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q8ycOcyq08g http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zRqtCubxUf8 Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 Granite Bay California Realtor,,,Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 placer county real estate records,Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 Granite Bay Real Estate Agent,commercial real estate Granite Bay california Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653
aggregate washing equipment price saudi arabia
 
02:57
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Views: 32 Sarah Wang
Bringing them home: separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children from their families
 
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This documentary DVD was produced in 1997 and forms part of the Bringing them home education resource for use in Australian classrooms. For more on the report see: https://bth.humanrights.gov.au/ This resource is based on 'Bringing them home' , the report of the National Inquiry into the Separation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Children from Their Families, and on the history of forcible separation and other policies which have impacted on the lives of Indigenous Australians. This documentary complements a collection of curriculum-linked activities and teaching resources, plus a range of photographs, maps and diagrams, timelines, legal texts and glossaries. The Australian Human Rights Commission invites teachers and students to use this resource to explore, understand and reflect on one of the most difficult chapters of our national history and to engage with some of the key concepts involved in the reconciliation debate in Australia. For the education resource see: https://www.humanrights.gov.au/education/human-rights-school-classroom Warning: This video may contain images / voices of deceased Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons. Video produced by Oziris. © Australian Human Rights Commission
World's biggest economies throughout history | The Economist
 
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Time is money: An animated infographic showing the top three economies throughout history. Does China have the world's largest economy? Is China's economy bigger than America's? Time is money–the world's largest economies throughout history. At the start of the Common Era, India was the world’s largest economy, followed by China. The far-flung Roman Empire came a distant third. A thousand years later, it looked almost the same. But third place shifted to Byzantium, in modern-day Turkey. Five hundred years after that, Italy returned, rich from renaissance trade. Over several centuries, other European powers vied for third: initially France, and then Britain. China and India swapped places. After the industrial revolution, the top three economies accounted for less than half of global output. In the 20th century, America dominated. China temporarily fell away. Russia made the top three. As did Japan. Britain dropped down. Now the modern world resembles the distant past: China and India are back, along with a single Western economy. And America’s preeminence is over. China overtakes US as the world's largest economy. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1sWSMMP
Views: 137577 The Economist
Granite Bay Ca Homes For Sale Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653
 
00:52
Granite Bay Ca Homes For Sale Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 Tom & Gwen Conway 916.786.7653 www.ShowMeHomes.com Granite Bay's roots lead back to the early 1850's, when gold miners first settled the banks of the American River. According to retired Park Ranger Dave McGrath there were 37 gold mining settlements along both sides of the River. In its earliest beginnings, it was known as "Granite Bar", a small mining camp just below Horseshoe Bar. The North Fork Ditch, built by the Natoma Company between 1852 and 1954, not only allowed miners to surface mine gold, it continued to supply water to the area and attracted settlers who planted olive and almond orchards. When the lake is low you can still find rows of stumps straight out from the Granite Bay boat launch ramp. Remains of the ditch can still be seen in places along the trail leading up the lake from Horseshoe Bar and along the water's edge above the dam at low lake level. The sides of the ditch were concreted in 1925, which has helped to preserve its visibility. Vivian Rasmussen recalled that what was is now called Auburn-Folsom Road was originally called Auburn-Sacramento Road. The road was built in 1850 to allow miners to travel back and forth with supplies. Whiskey Bar, Horseshoe Bar, and Rattlesnake Bar Roads were all established to connect the various settlements to the bar or to the main road. Granite Bar, later to be known as Granite Bay was named for the granite rock quarried from its banks and used as rip-rap in the wing dams of Folsom Dam. Cattle ranchers also took advantage of availability of water and grassy slopes. "There were two major cattle ranges when I moved here in 1956" stated H.T.Newberry, a resident of Skyway. Mooney was one and Grant Bender was the other. "A big chunk of their property was condemned by the government so they could fill the lake" he explained. The remainder of the ranches were subdivided and sold off to people moving into the area. Granite Bay Vista, an early subdivision by John Mercurio and Louis Gavino, probably helped make the name popular according to Niel Lester, who built a home in the tract with her husband in 1962. Things have changed, naturally said Lester. Douglas Blvd. used to be called Rocky Ridge Road east of Sunrise Blvd.. For most newcomers, Rocky Ridge has no significance since most of the ridge has been demolished with the widening and development along Douglas Blvd. Granite Bay didn't become the official name of the area until July 28, 1987. Until then the expanding housing developments along this section of the lake were just as apt to be referred to as Folsom Lake and were included in Roseville's sphere of influence out to Barton Road for Government Planning purposes. Residents of the area felt the goal and lifestyle of Roseville was not consistent with their own and placed the proposition before the County Board of Supervisors to be recognized as the unincorporated community of Granite Bay. Then Assemblyman, Tim Leslie, issued a proclamentation and with County Supervisor's approval the community became officially known as Granite Bay. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5kuCl-7pAHc http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y8fiKN9CznA Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 Granite Bay California Real Estate Video,,,Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 placer county real estate news,Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653 Granite Bay Ca Video Tour,Granite Bay Ca Realtors Call Tom and Gwen 916-786-7653
Atlantic slave trade
 
01:17:12
The Atlantic slave trade or transatlantic slave trade took place across the Atlantic Ocean from the 16th through to the 19th centuries. The vast majority of those enslaved that were transported to the New World, many on the triangular trade route and its Middle Passage, were West Africans from the central and western parts of the continent sold by West Africans to Western European slave traders, or by direct European capture to the Americas. The numbers were so great that Africans who came by way of the slave trade became the most numerous Old-World immigrants in both North and South America before the late 18th century. Far more slaves were taken to South America than to the north. The South Atlantic economic system centered on producing commodity crops, and making goods and clothing to sell in Europe, and increasing the numbers of African slaves brought to the New World. This was crucial to those Western European countries which, in the late seventeenth and eighteenth centuries, were vying with each other to create overseas empires. The Portuguese were the first to engage in the New World slave trade in the 16th century, and others soon followed. Ship owners considered the slaves as cargo to be transported to the Americas as quickly and cheaply as possible, there to be sold to labour in coffee, tobacco, cocoa, sugar and cotton plantations, gold and silver mines, rice fields, construction industry, cutting timber for ships, in skilled labour, and as domestic servants. The first Africans imported to the English colonies were classified as "indentured servants," like workers coming from England, and also, "apprentices for life". By the middle of the 17th century, slavery had hardened as a racial caste; they and their offspring were legally the property of their owners, and children born to slave mothers were slaves. As property, the people were considered merchandise or units of labour, and were sold at markets with other goods and services. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 2941 Audiopedia
Decolonizing Language Revitalization
 
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September 25, 2013 - How has Eurocentric anthropology and linguistics affected the way we interpret our elders and ancestors who share their cultural knowledge with foreign researchers? Join us for a presentation with Khelsilem Rivers and April Charlo, indigenous peoples from community-based and cultural revitalization backgrounds, who will be discussing decolonization of language revitalization. Their presentation and open dialogue will address the context of rapid language loss and decline, and how colonization has affected or is embedded in the strategies of revitalization. In an effort to revitalize Indigenous languages, communities may have unknowingly adopted or assimilated colonized ways of thinking as they invest interest and attempt to repair or restore ties to culture and language. Are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha, et all with an English-mind or are we learning to speak Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyawēwin, Kanien'kéha with a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, Nēhiyaw, Kanien'keháka mind? Indigenous languages represent one of the darkest ways in which ethnocide and cultural genocide have occurred. It is expected in the next twenty-five years over 700 of the worlds Indigenous languages will be forgotten. In the Vancouver area alone, the two Indigenous languages are considered critical endangered; Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) language has five to seven fluent speakers and hən̓q̓əmin̓əm has one fluent speaker left. Decolonizing Language Revitalization aims to put forward perspectives of shifting values, cultural understandings, and impacts on community. It is the stories we tell ourselves (as a people) that impacts who we believe we are, and then who we become. But if the stories -- even including, or especially the Indigenous ones -- are filtered through colonialism, we have become a different people because of it. April Charlo from Bitterroot Salish people and is a member of the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana. Khelsilem Rivers is a Sḵwx̱wú7mesh-Kwakwa̱ka̱'wakw language revitalization activist from Vancouver. Supported by SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement http://sfuwoodwards.ca/index.php/community
California Gold Rush
 
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Coordinates: 38°48′09″N 120°53′41″W / 38.80250°N 120.89472°W / 38.80250; -120.89472 This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 438 encyclopediacc
Mining
 
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Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 257 encyclopediacc
Hiding in Plain Sight: Connecting the Masterpiece to the Master - Haida Art
 
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Part of a series of lectures sponsored by the University of Washington's School of Art, Division of Art History and held at the Henry Art Gallery, this lecture examines the artwork of the Haida, an indigenous nation from the archipelago Haida Gwaii, off the coast of British Columbia. Discover the meaning behind raven, beaver and other symbols integrated into Haida sculptures, paintings and costumes to share the history and culture of the Haida people. Learn the likely identity of the mysterious carver who created several acclaimed Haida works, who has only recently been discovered. This production is presented by the Bill Holm Center for the Study of Northwest Coast Art at the Burke Museum at the University of Washington. Robin K. Wright, professor, Art History, School of Art; curator, Burke Museum 03/24/2008
Views: 5949 UW Video
A new era
 
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Welcome to iCoin...
The Saskatoon Police Service - Never the Same Day Twice
 
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The Saskatoon Police Service offers career opportunities that are worth serious consideration. The city has a rapidly growing Aboriginal population and the service must reflect this change. As protectors and peacemakers, the role police play in any community is invaluable. The police service offers careers both on the front lines and in civilian support positions. For more information visit saskatoonpoliceservice.ca. ©2014 Saskatoon Police Service
Views: 12829 SaskatoonPolice
Saskatchewan
 
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Saskatchewan (/səˈskætʃəwən/ or /səˈskætʃəˌwɑːn/) is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres (251,700 sq mi) and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres (228,800 sq mi), the remainder being water area (covered by lakes/ponds, reservoirs and rivers). Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by the Province of Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of December 2013, the population of Saskatchewan was estimated at 1,114,170. Residents primarily live in the southern half of the province. Of the total population, 257,300 live in the province's largest city, Saskatoon, while 210,000 live in the provincial capital, Regina. Other major cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current and North Battleford. Saskatchewan was first explored by Europeans in 1690 and settled in 1774, having also been inhabited for thousands of years by various indigenous groups. It became a province in 1905, its name derived from the Saskatchewan River. The river was known as kisiskāciwani-sīpiy ("swift flowing river") in the Cree language. In the early 20th century the province became known as a stronghold for Canadian democratic socialism. Tommy Douglas, who was premier from 1944 to 1961, became the first social-democratic politician to be elected in North America. The province's economy is based on agriculture, mining, and energy. Saskatchewan's current premier is Brad Wall and its lieutenant-governor is Vaughn Solomon Schofield. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 329 Audiopedia
California History Blueprint Luncheon: Bill Deverell Part 2
 
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Part II: Bill Deverell is a professor of history at University of Southern California. He gives a keynote address on late nineteenth-century California history. The talk took place at the California History Blueprint Luncheon at the California Historical Society on Feb. 5, 2014.
Views: 144 UCDavis
Resource Abundance by Design | William McDonough at World Economic Forum
 
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September 12, 2014: Resource Abundance by Design presented by William McDonough at the World Economic Forum in Tianjin, China. video courtesy of World Economic Forum
Views: 18784 William McDonough
Louis Riel Day 2014
 
01:55:55
In celebration of Louis Riel Day, the Law Society considered section 91(24) of the Constitution Act and its implications of recent high court decisions on Métis and Aboriginal peoples.
Aboriginal Youth & Media Conference at MOA (Part Two)
 
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Webcast sponsored by the Irving K. Barber Learning Centre and hosted by the Museum of Anthropology. "Assert, Defend, Take Space: Aboriginal Youth Conference on Identity, Activism and Film" was a day-long conference on issues of concern to Aboriginal youth. Artists from the Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth exhibition were joined by young filmmakers and activists from across Canada. Building off of the screened films, panelists discussed themes of youth identity and politics, the objectification of Indigenous women, and environmentalism and youth activism. "Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth"" is an exhibition that looked at the diverse ways urban Aboriginal youth are asserting their identity and affirming their relationship to both urban spaces and ancestral territories. Unfiltered and unapologetic, over 20 young artists from across Canada, the US, and around the world define what it really means to be an urban Aboriginal youth today. In doing so they challenge centuries of stereotyping and assimilation policies.This exhibit will leave visitors with the understanding that today's urban Aboriginal youth are not only acutely aware of the ongoing impacts of colonization, but are also creatively engaging with decolonizing movements through new media, film, fashion, photography, painting, performance, creative writing and traditional art forms. Artists in the exhibition include Alison Bremner (Tlingit), Deanna Bittern (Ojibwe), Jamie Blankenship-Attig (Nlaka’pamux, Secwepemc, Nez Perce, Muskoday Cree), Kelli Clifton (Tsimshian), Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin), Ippiksaut Friesen (Inuit), Clifton Guthrie (Tsimshian), Cody Lecoy (Okanagan/Esquimalt), Arizona Leger (Fijian, Samoan, Tongan, Maori), Danielle Morsette (Stó:lō /Suquamish), Ellena Neel (Kwakwaka'wakw/Ahousaht), Zach Soakai (Tongan, Samoan), Diamond Point (Musqueam), Crystal Smith de Molina (Git’ga’at), Nola Naera (Maori), Kelsey Sparrow (Musqueam/Anishinabe), Cole Speck (Kwakwaka'wakw), Rose Stiffarm ((Siksika Blackfoot, Chippewa Cree, Tsartlip Saanich, Cowichan, A'aninin, Nakoda, French, & Scottish), Taleetha Tait (Wet’suwet’en), Marja Bål Nango (Sámi, Norway), Harry Brown (Kwakwaka'wakw), Anna McKenzie (Opaskwayak Cree, Manitoba), Sarah Yankoo (Austrian, Scottish, Algonquin, Irish and Romanian), Raymond Caplin (Mi’gmac), Emilio Wawatie (Anishanabe) and the Northern Collection (Toombz/Shane Kelsey [Mohawk], and the Curse/Cory Golder [Mi’maq]). Also included are works from the Urban Native Youth Association, Musqueam youth and the Native Youth Program. The exhibition was curated by Pam Brown (Heiltsuk Nation), Curator, Pacific Northwest, and Curatorial Assistant Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers (Blackfoot, Blood Reserve/Sami, northern Norway).
How to Clean Your Panama Jack Greased Leather Boots
 
02:00
Tutorial on how to clean your Panama Jack greased leather Boots. Maintain your boots in the best condition by following these simple steps. Care and cleaning of your Panama Jacks http://bit.ly/2mSU4J3 Buy a care kit http://bit.ly/2lBcXiF
Views: 20483 Panama Jack
INFORMUCATE HISTORY GUIDE: CALIFORNIA GOLD RUSH
 
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http://www.informucate.com/fast-fact-videos/history Informucate History Guides give you the fast facts on thousands of important events in US and world history. Fast, fun, and informative, our short videos are the easiest way to learn about the events that shaped our world. Learn something new today, and impress your friends with your vast knowledge of history: http://www.informucate.com/fast-fact-videos/history Is there a historical event you want us to cover? Found a mistake? Send us a message on Facebook or Tweet us https://www.facebook.com/informucate https://twitter.com/informucate
Views: 644 INFORMUCATE
JSGS Public Lecture: Implementing the Duty to Consult
 
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JSGS Public Lecture: Implementing the Duty to Consult: Explaining Similarities and Differences in Provincial Approaches to Aboriginal Consultation Presented by: Dr. Martin Papillon, Associate Professor, School of Political Studies, University of Ottawa Provincial governments in Canada have responded to recent Supreme Court decisions on the constitutional duty to consult Aboriginal peoples with a series of policies outlining their interpretation of this new norm and procedures to implement it. While these policies vary significantly, broadly reflecting the specific economic, political and legal context of Aboriginal-state relations in each province, recent developments suggest a convergence both in the definition and in the implementation of the duty to consult across Canada. This presentation discussed possible explanations for this convergence and its implications for Aboriginal-provincial relations and for policy-making in the Canadian federation more broadly.
Views: 888 jsgspp
The California History Blueprint Luncheon: Shelley Brooks
 
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Shelley Brooks is the communications coordinator for the California History-Social Science Project. She outlines a California History lesson on the Gilded Age. The talk took place at the California History Blueprint Luncheon at the California Historical Society on Feb. 5, 2014.
Views: 196 UCDavis
First Opium War
 
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The First Opium War (1839–42), also known as the Opium War and as the Anglo-Chinese War, was fought between Great Britain and China over their conflicting viewpoints on diplomatic relations, trade, and the administration of justice for foreign nationals. Chinese goods, particularly silk, spices and tea were in high demand in European countries. However, the market for Western goods in China was virtually non-existent, partly because China was largely self-sufficient and trade laws denied foreigners access to China's interior. In addition the Chinese Emperor banned the trade of most European goods, leaving silver and gold as the only acceptable method of payment. This caused a silver shortage back in Europe and became a significant hindrance to trade. This trade deficit was alleviated when the Europeans found a product the Chinese consumers did want; highly addictive opium. While this too was banned by the Emperor, smuggling of the drug was rampant. The silver deficit was quickly reduced and eventually reversed. However, as a result of this new trade, the number of opium addicts increased, which greatly concerned successive emperors. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 12839 Audiopedia
Content and Analysis in Native Art Part 1 of 2
 
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Content and Analysis in Native Art: Moving Past Form and Function. This video is part 1 of 2. For part 2, visit: http://youtu.be/uZQO8l7GWmc Speakers: Lara Evans, Cherokee Nation, art historian, art history faculty, Institute of American Indian Arts Kade Twist, Cherokee Nation, mixed media artist Frank Buffalo Hyde, Onondaga, painter Moderator: Carolyn Kastner, Curator, Georgia O'Keeffe Museum (moderator) Many contemporary Native artists have expressed concern that their work is often examined in terms of materials, process, and function, while a more in-depth content analysis is overlooked. This panel discussion looks at the issue and its history. This panel discussion was part of the Indian Arts Research Center at the School for Advanced Research's 2014 Speaker Series, Art in Flux, which was dedicated to discussing key issues and programs affecting artists and art institutions today. Art in Flux was developed by the School for Advanced Research with the help of Professor Lara Evans of the Institute of American Indian Arts. Events took place at SAR and the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. This event was recorded on Wednesday, April 23, 2014 at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts.
Macaroon, Macaron, Macaroni: The Secret Language of Food with Dan Jurafsky
 
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Why does "macaroon" sound like "macaroni"? Did ketchup really come from China? Do the adjectives on a menu predict how much your dinner will cost? Do men and women use different words in restaurant reviews? The language we use to talk about food offers surprising insights on world history, economics and psychology. Dan Jurafsky is professor of linguistics and computer science, and chair of linguistics. A 2002 MacArthur Fellowship recipient, he teaches computational linguistics—he co-wrote the popular textbook Speech and Language Processing and co-created the first massively open online course in “Natural Language Processing.” Professor Jurafsky's research focuses on the automatic extraction of meaning from speech and text in English and Chinese, with applications to the behavioral and social sciences. His most recent book is The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu. Classes Without Quizzes are presented by the Stanford Alumni Association. Filmed on location at Stanford Reunion Homecoming 2014.
Views: 4265 Stanford Alumni
2014 Sol Kanee Lecture - Justice Murray Sinclair
 
02:02:47
The Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul's College, University of Manitoba, is proud to present the Eleventh Annual Sol Kanee Lecture on International Peace and Justice. This year's guest lecturer was Justice Murray Sinclair, Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada (www.trc.ca). Justice Sinclair addressed the question: What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? The lecture took place on Monday, September 29, 2014 at the University of Manitoba. 0:04 Opening Remarks and Welcome: Dr. Sean Byrne, Director, Arthur V. Mauro Centre for Peace and Justice at St. Paul’s College 4:32 Greetings: Dr. Chris Adams, Rector, St. Paul’s College at the University of Manitoba 6:55 Introduction of Justice Murray Sinclair: Dr. Niigaanwewidam Sinclair, Assistant Professor, Native Studies, University of Manitoba 17:20 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 1 46:28 Video presentations – Justice Murray included a series of video interviews with residential school survivors as a part of his lecture 53:30 What Do We Do About the Legacy of Indian Residential Schools? Justice Murray Sinclair Part 2 1:29:33 Question and Answer Period: Dr. Sean Byrne, Moderator 1:59:12 Acknowledgement Peace and Conflicts Studies students, Ms. Mary Anne Clarke and Ms. Jennifer Ham acknowledge and thank Justice Sinclair 2:01:18 Concluding Remarks: Dr. Sean Byrne For more information on this and other Mauro Centre events, please visit: www.facebook.com/maurocentre www.umanitoba.ca/colleges/st_pauls/mauro_centre/
Views: 1194 MauroCentre
Sharper Focus/Wider Lens: Salt Water Encounters
 
01:42:13
MSU faculty participating in Salt Water Encounters: Conducting Research Beneath, Beside and Across the Oceans included: Dr. Peter Beattie, Dr. Eva Kassens-Noor, Nathaniel Ostrom, Masako Tominga, and Gail Vander Stoep.
Views: 50 HonorsCollegeMSU
Vulnerable Populations and Aboriginal Health - Time for a Curriculum
 
01:26:37
This third instalment in our series on social paediatrics will take a more focussed look at vulnerable populations, including inner city and aboriginal children and youth. The panel will provide an overview of the vulnerabilities of inner city youth who are at greater risk of school failure, substance use, adjudication, parenthood, and poor mental health as compared to their non-urban counterparts. We will also discuss mechanisms to foster resilience among youth living in the inner city, and will look at some of the aspects of these issues that might uniquely affect Canada's aboriginal population as well. The discussion will finish by asking whether it is time to develop a curriculum that covers the various issues of social paediatrics, and embed this in the education of paediatricians and other healthcare providers.
Benjamin Harrison
 
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Benjamin Harrison (August 20, 1833 – March 13, 1901) was the 23rd President of the United States (1889–1893); he was the grandson of the ninth President, William Henry Harrison. Harrison had become a prominent local attorney, Presbyterian church leader and politician in Indianapolis, Indiana. During the American Civil War, he served the Union for most of the war as a colonel and on February 14, 1865 was confirmed by the U.S. Senate as a brevet brigadier general of volunteers to rank from January 23, 1865. Afterwards, he unsuccessfully ran for the governorship of Indiana but was later elected to the U.S. Senate by the Indiana legislature. Harrison, a Republican, was elected to the presidency in 1888, defeating the Democratic incumbent Grover Cleveland. Hallmarks of his administration included unprecedented economic legislation, including the McKinley Tariff, which imposed historic protective trade rates, and the Sherman Antitrust Act; Harrison facilitated the creation of the National Forests through an amendment to the Land Revision Act of 1891. He also substantially strengthened and modernized the Navy, and conducted an active foreign policy. He proposed, in vain, federal education funding as well as voting rights enforcement for African Americans during his administration. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1299 Audiopedia
Perth
 
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Perth /ˈpɜrθ/ is the capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth most populous city in Australia, with an estimated population of 1.97 million (on 30 June 2013) living in Greater Perth. Part of the South West Land Division of Western Australia, the majority of the metropolitan area of Perth is located on the Swan Coastal Plain, a narrow strip between the Indian Ocean and the Darling Scarp, a low coastal escarpment. The first areas settled were on the Swan River, with the city's central business district and port (Fremantle) both located on its shores. Perth is formally divided into a number of local government areas, which themselves consist of a large number of suburbs, extending from Two Rocks in the north to Rockingham in the south, and east inland to The Lakes. Perth was originally founded by Captain James Stirling in 1829 as the administrative centre of the Swan River Colony, and gained city status in 1856 (currently vested in the smaller City of Perth). The city is named for Perth, Scotland, by influence of Sir George Murray, then British Secretary of State for War and the Colonies. The city's population increased substantially as a result of the Western Australian gold rushes in the late 19th century, largely as a result of emigration from the eastern colonies of Australia. During Australia's involvement in World War II, Fremantle served as a base for submarines operating in the Pacific Theatre, and a US Navy Catalina flying boat fleet was based at Matilda Bay. An influx of immigrants after the war, predominantly from Britain, Greece, Italy and Yugoslavia, led to rapid population growth. This was followed by a surge in economic activity flowing from several mining booms in the late 20th and early 21st centuries that saw Perth become the regional headquarters for a number of large mining operations located around the state. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 326 Audiopedia
Dr. Henry Yu, Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada
 
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Simon Fraser University's Centre for Dialogue presents Dr. Henry Yu, UBC History Professor, Co-Chair of City of Vancouver's "Dialogues between Urban Aboriginal, First Nations, and Immigrant Communities" Project (2010-2012), and feature speaker for the Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada community dialogue. About Reconciling Injustices in a Pluralistic Canada This full-day dialogue drew upon the knowledge and experiences of affected communities to identify shared principles and approaches to support the reconciliation of injustices in Canadian society. The dialogue hosted 120 community leaders involved in the reconciliation of specific injustices, government officials, decision-makers from major institutions and members of the public. More information: www.sfu.ca/reconciling-injustices. About Dr. Henry Yu Dr. Henry Yu was born in Vancouver, B.C., and received his BA in Honours History from UBC and an MA and PhD in History from Princeton University. Besides being the Principal of St. John's College, Yu is involved in the collaborative effort to re-imagine the history of Vancouver and of Canada by focusing on how migrants from Asia, Europe, and other parts of the Americas engaged with each other and with First Nations peoples historically. He was the Co-Chair of the City of Vancouver's project, "Dialogues between First Nations, Urban Aboriginal, and Immigrant Communities". Yu is committed to expanding the engagement between academic research and the communities which the university serves. Between 2010-2012, he was the Project Lead for the $1.175 million "Chinese Canadian Stories" project involving universities and a wide spectrum of over 29 community organizations across Canada. In 2012 he was honoured for his work with a Queen Elizabeth Diamond Jubilee Medal. He is currently writing a book entitled "Pacific Canada," another book entitled "How Tiger Woods Lost His Stripes," as well as a third book project which examines the history of Chinese migration in the Pacific world.
Grand Rapids, Michigan
 
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Grand Rapids is a city in the U.S. state of Michigan. It is located on the Grand River about 25 miles east of Lake Michigan. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 188,040. In 2010, the Grand Rapids metropolitan area had a population of 1,005,648, and the combined statistical area of Grand Rapids-Muskegon-Holland had a population of 1,321,557. Grand Rapids is the county seat of Kent County, Michigan, second largest city in Michigan (after Detroit), and the largest city in West Michigan. A historic furniture-manufacturing center, Grand Rapids is still home to five of the world's leading office furniture companies, and is nicknamed Furniture City. Its more common modern nickname of River City refers to the landmark river for which it was named. The city and surrounding communities are economically diverse, and contribute heavily to the health care, information technology, automotive, aviation, and consumer goods manufacturing industries, among others. Grand Rapids was the home of The First Family of U.S, Boxing: Floyd Sr., Jr., Jeff, and Roger Mayweather, World Championship Boxer James Toney, singer and song writer Anthony Kiedis, the filmmakers Paul Schrader and Leonard Schrader, the singer Al Green and U.S. President Gerald Ford, who—along with his wife Betty—is buried on the grounds of the Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum in Grand Rapids. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 255 Audiopedia
Sharper Focus/Wider Lens Presents: Salt Water Encounters
 
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On Feb. 4, 2013 Sharper Focus Wider Lens presented "Salt Water Encounters: Conducting Research Beneath, Beside and Across Oceans." The forum featured leading MSU faculty: Dr. Peter Beattie, associate professor in the Department of History; Dr. Gail Vander Stoep, associate professor in the Department of Community, Agriculture, Recreation, and Resource Studies; Dr. Eva Kassens-Noor, assistant professor of Urban and Transport Planning in the School of Planning, Design and Construction, and adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Geography; Dr. Masako Tominaga, assistant professor in the Department of Geological Sciences; and Dr. Nathaniel Ostrom, professor in the Department of Zoology. The event was moderated by Dr. Cynthia Jackson-Elmoore, dean of the MSU Honors College.
Views: 54 HonorsCollegeMSU
Napoleon III
 
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Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte was the first President of the French Second Republic and, as Napoleon III, the Emperor of the Second French Empire. He was the nephew and heir of Napoleon I. He was the first President of France to be elected by a direct popular vote. However, when he was blocked by the Constitution and Parliament from running for a second term, he organized a coup d'état in 1851, and then took the throne as Napoleon III on 2 December 1852, the forty-eighth anniversary of Napoleon I's coronation. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 16628 encyclopediacc
Russo-Japanese War
 
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The Russo-Japanese War was "the first great war of the 20th century." It grew out of rival imperial ambitions of the Russian Empire and the Empire of Japan over Manchuria and Korea. The major theatres of operations were Southern Manchuria, specifically the area around the Liaodong Peninsula and Mukden; and the seas around Korea, Japan, and the Yellow Sea. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 36380 encyclopediacc
Fraudes Chirurgien Esthétique déjà sanctionné Paris 16
 
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Fraudes Chirurgien Esthétique Paris 16 è 1200 euros en espèces http://www.argenttropcher.fr/marc-henri-bon-une-patiente-saisit-le-tribunal/#more-1304 http://www.legal-scope.fr/marc-henri-bon-condamne-par-tribunal-correctionnel/#more-297 http://www.chirurgieesthetiquefrance.fr/dr-marc-henri-bon-une-personne-tres-mecontente-saisit-le-tribunal/ http://www.top-chirurgie-esthetique.fr/docteur-marc-bon-refus-du-conseil-departemental-dune-qualification-en-chirurgie-plastique-reconstructrice-et-esthetique-appel/ http://www.argenttropcher.fr/marc-henri-bon-une-patiente-saisit-le-tribunal/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lUbUayfVDt0 http://lemediascope.fr/dr-marc-henri-bon-le-tribunal-ordonne-une-expertise-medicale/#more-154641
Views: 7355 lemediascope
Vermont
 
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Vermont is a state in the New England region of the northeastern United States. Vermont is the 6th least extensive and the 2nd least populous of the 50 United States after Wyoming. It is the only New England state not bordering the Atlantic Ocean. Lake Champlain forms half of Vermont's western border, which it shares with the state of New York. The Green Mountains are within the state. Vermont is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east across the Connecticut River, New York to the west, and the Canadian province of Quebec to the north. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 423 encyclopediacc
Nevada
 
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Nevada is a state in the western, mountain west, and southwestern regions of the United States. Nevada is the 7th most extensive, the 35th most populous, and the 9th least densely populated of the 50 United States. Nearly three-quarters of Nevada's people live in Clark County, which contains the Las Vegas--Paradise metropolitan area where the state's three largest incorporated cities are located. Nevada's capital is Carson City. Nevada is officially known as the "Silver State" due to the importance of silver to its history and economy. It is also known as the "Battle Born State", because it achieved statehood during the Civil War; "Sagebrush State", for the native eponymous plant; and "Sage hen State." This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 185 encyclopediacc
19th century
 
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The 19th century was the century marked by the collapse of the Spanish, First and Second French, Chinese, Holy Roman and Mughal empires. This paved the way for the growing influence of the British Empire, the Russian Empire, the United States, the German Empire, the Second French Colonial Empire and the Empire of Japan. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 1807 encyclopediacc
Reno, Nevada
 
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Reno is a city in the US state of Nevada. Known as "The Biggest Little City in the World", Reno is famous for its casinos. The city is situated in the northwestern part of the state and is the county seat of Washoe County. Reno is the most populous Nevada city outside of the Las Vegas metropolitan area. As of the 2010 census, the city had a population of 225,221 making it the fourth most populous city in the state after Las Vegas, Henderson, and North Las Vegas. The city sits in a high desert valley at the foot of the Sierra Nevada. Reno is the birthplace of Caesars Entertainment Corporation. The Reno–Sparks metropolitan area is informally called the Truckee Meadows and consists of nearly 500,000 residents. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 675 Audiopedia
Nativism (politics)
 
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Nativism is the political position of demanding a favored status for certain established inhabitants of a nation as compared to claims of newcomers or immigrants. Nativism typically means opposition to immigration, and support of efforts to lower the political or legal status of specific ethnic or cultural groups who are considered hostile or alien to the natural culture, upon the assumption that they cannot be assimilated. According to Fetzer, (2000) opposition to immigration is common in many countries because of issues of national, cultural, and religious identity. The phenomenon has been studied especially in Australia, Canada, New Zealand and the United States, as well as Europe in recent years, where immigration is seen as lowering the wages of the less well paid natives. Thus nativism has become a general term for 'opposition to immigration' based on fears that the immigrants will distort or spoil existing cultural values. In situations where the nativistic movement exists inside of dominant culture it tends to be associated with xenophobic and assimilationist projects. At the other end of the spectrum, in situations where immigrants greatly outnumber the original inhabitants or where contact forces economic and cultural change, nativistic movements can allow cultural survival. Among North American Indians important nativist movements include Neolin (the "Delaware Prophet", 1762), Tenskwatawa (the Shawnee prophet, 1808), and Wovoka (the Ghost Dance movement, 1889). They held anti-white views, teaching that whites were morally inferior to the Indians and their ways must be rejected. Thus Tenskwatawa taught that the Americans were "children of the Evil Spirit." This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 549 Audiopedia
Philmont Scout Ranch
 
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Philmont Scout Ranch is a large, rugged, mountainous ranch located near the town of Cimarron, New Mexico, covering approximately 137,500 acres (556 km2) of wilderness in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains of the Rocky Mountains of northern New Mexico. The ranch, formerly the property of oil baron Waite Phillips and now that of the Boy Scouts of America, is a National High Adventure Base in which crews of Scouts and Venturers take part in backpacking expeditions and other outdoor activities. It is the one of the largest youth camps in the world in land area. Between June 8 and August 22 around 23,000 Scouts and adult leaders backpack across the Ranch's extensive backcountry while over 1,250 seasonal staff personnel maintain the Ranch's summer operations. Philmont is also home to the Philmont Training Center and the Seton Museum. The Training Center is the primary location for BSA's national volunteer training programs. Philmont is also operated as a ranch, maintaining small herds of cattle, horses, burros and bison. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 224 Audiopedia
Saskatchewan
 
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Saskatchewan is a prairie province in Canada, which has a total area of 651,900 square kilometres and a land area of 592,534 square kilometres , the remainder being water area . Saskatchewan is bordered on the west by the Province of Alberta, on the north by the Northwest Territories, on the east by Manitoba, and on the south by the U.S. states of Montana and North Dakota. As of December 2013, the population of Saskatchewan was estimated at 1,114,170. Residents primarily live in the southern half of the province. Of the total population, 257,300 live in the province's largest city, Saskatoon, while 210,000 live in the provincial capital, Regina. Other major cities include Prince Albert, Moose Jaw, Yorkton, Swift Current and North Battleford. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 272 encyclopediacc
Crimean War
 
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The Crimean War (pronounced /kraɪˈmiːən/ or /krɨˈmiːən/) (October 1853 -- February 1856) was a conflict in which Russia lost to an alliance of France, Britain, the Ottoman Empire, and Sardinia. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 332 Audiopedia
Kansas
 
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Kansas /ˈkænzəs/ KAN-zəs is a U.S. state located in the Midwestern United States. It is named after the Kansa Native American tribe which inhabited the area. The tribe's name (natively kką:ze) is often said to mean "people of the wind" or "people of the south wind," although this was probably not the term's original meaning. Residents of Kansas are called "Kansans." For thousands of years, what is now Kansas was home to numerous and diverse Native American tribes. Tribes in the Eastern part of the state generally lived in villages along the river valleys. Tribes in the Western part of the state were semi-nomadic and hunted large herds of bison. Kansas was first settled by European Americans in the 1830s, but the pace of settlement accelerated in the 1850s, in the midst of political wars over the slavery issue. When it was officially opened to settlement by the U.S. government in 1854, abolitionist Free-Staters from New England and pro-slavery settlers from neighboring Missouri rushed to the territory to determine whether Kansas would become a free state or a slave state. Thus, the area was a hotbed of violence and chaos in its early days as these forces collided, and was known as Bleeding Kansas. The abolitionists eventually prevailed and on January 29, 1861, Kansas entered the Union as a free state. After the Civil War, the population of Kansas grew rapidly when waves of immigrants turned the prairie into farmland. Today, Kansas is one of the most productive agricultural states, producing high yields of wheat, sorghum, and sunflowers. Kansas is the 15th most extensive and the 34th most populous of the 50 United States. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 402 Audiopedia
Whitby
 
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Whitby is a seaside town, port and civil parish in the Borough of Scarborough and English county of North Yorkshire. Prior to local government reorganisations in the late 1960s, it was part of the North Riding of Yorkshire. Situated on the east coast of Yorkshire at the mouth of the River Esk, Whitby has an established maritime, mineral and tourist heritage. Its East Cliff is home to the ruins of Whitby Abbey, where Caedmon, the earliest recognised English poet, lived. The fishing port developed during the Middle Ages, supporting important herring and whaling fleets, and was (along with the nearby fishing village of Staithes) where Captain Cook learned seamanship. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 438 Audiopedia
New Mexico
 
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New Mexico is a state located in the southwest and western regions of the United States. It is usually considered one of the Mountain States. New Mexico is the 5th most extensive, the 36th most populous, and the 6th least densely populated of the 50 United States. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 206 encyclopediacc