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Dr. Becker on Cryptococcal Infection
 
05:34
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/03/18/cryptococcal-infection.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses a common infection in pets called cryptococcal infections.
Views: 3748 MercolaHealthyPets
Street Cat with Severely Fungal Meowing Ask for Food and Finally Getting Health
 
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A poor street cat was found meowing out at side of the street asking for food with severely facial swelling. She is really suffered with this infection and has been ignored from everyone to help. It’s lucky that animal lovers met her and picked up to a vet for treatment. She has severely fungal disease or Cryptococcosis and can be spreading to the brain. She underwent long time of treatment with good medication and many contributed for her medical bills to bring her health. Finally, she’s getting full recovered and the facial swelling is gone. It’s very heart touching, we thank all kind people that involved bringing her new chance at life with truly of love. Courtesy: โชติ บก
Views: 33632 AnimalSTEP Official
Cryptococcosis
 
01:49
Views: 608 Trivian Vladmore
Cryptococcus gattii Deadly Fungus Spreads Killing-United States / Canada
 
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This Version of Cryptococcus gattii has been Genetically Modified and is Resistant to Treatment leaving a Trail of Death. Canada and United States have New Cases of Great Numbers to point of concern. This novel fungus is worrisome because it appears to be a threat to otherwise healthy people. This is Spreading to ALL types of Animals , even DOLPHINS!!! Read More: http://www.emaxhealth.com/1275/fungus-cryptococcus-gatti-threat-healthy-people.html Infection with C. gattii causes symptoms about two weeks or more after individuals or animals have been exposed to the airborne spores. Once the spores are inhaled, they embed themselves in the lungs, colonize, and then spread throughout the body. Symptoms include persistent cough, pneumonia, sharp chest pains, shortness of breath, fever, weight loss, headache, and nighttime sweats. Meningitis can also occur.
Views: 11355 855h0le
Nasal Discharge in Cats (2018)
 
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Discussion of nasal discharges in cats.
Views: 85 Rod Allrich
Nasopharyngeal polyp removal in a cat
 
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Dr Magnifico a small animal veterinarian removes a polyp from the back part of a cats mouth (nasopharyngeal polyp). What does a polyp look like? How is it diagnosed and how to remove one, along with the cost. For more information on these ask for free at Pawbly.com
Views: 1861 Krista Magnifico
Meningitis - causes, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, pathology
 
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What is meningitis? Meningitis describes inflammation of the meninges, the protective membranes that surround the brain and spinal cord. Find more videos at http://osms.it/more. Hundreds of thousands of current & future clinicians learn by Osmosis. We have unparalleled tools and materials to prepare you to succeed in school, on board exams, and as a future clinician. Sign up for a free trial at http://osms.it/more. Subscribe to our Youtube channel at http://osms.it/subscribe. Get early access to our upcoming video releases, practice questions, giveaways, and more when you follow us on social media: Facebook: http://osms.it/facebook Twitter: http://osms.it/twitter Instagram: http://osms.it/instagram Our Vision: Everyone who cares for someone will learn by Osmosis. Our Mission: To empower the world’s clinicians and caregivers with the best learning experience possible. Learn more here: http://osms.it/mission Medical disclaimer: Knowledge Diffusion Inc (DBA Osmosis) does not provide medical advice. Osmosis and the content available on Osmosis's properties (Osmosis.org, YouTube, and other channels) do not provide a diagnosis or other recommendation for treatment and are not a substitute for the professional judgment of a healthcare professional in diagnosis and treatment of any person or animal. The determination of the need for medical services and the types of healthcare to be provided to a patient are decisions that should be made only by a physician or other licensed health care provider. Always seek the advice of a physician or other qualified healthcare provider with any questions you have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 369500 Osmosis
What are the benefits of neutering my cat?
 
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What are the benefits of neutering my cat? What are the benefits of neutering my cat? Are you thinking of sterilizing your cat? It is a common practice that most domestic cats undergo to improve their quality of life and prevent them from wandering off in search of a mate. There are many people who are against this practice and consider it a...
Views: 72 Laza Channel
Feline Ischemic Encephalopathy in Cats
 
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Concerned that your cat may have Ischemic Encephalophathy? Here are some signs and symptoms to watch out for: neurological signs like seizures, circling movements, alter behavior like unexplained aggression, and blindness. Feline ischemic encephalopathy (FIE) is caused by the presence of a parasite, the Cuterebra larva, in a cat's brain.
Views: 456 petMD
Communicating Risk (Cryptococcosis)
 
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Group 3 WHS Assignment 2016
Seefah suffers cryptococcosis.
 
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ผ่าน YouTube capture
Views: 125 SaveThaiStrayS
Dr. Becker, Dr. Raditic, and Dr. Conway on Integrative Veterinary Medicine (Part 2)
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2014/11/03/integrative-holistic-veterinarians.aspx?x_cid=youtube Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, interviews Dr. Raditic and Dr. Conway, two doctors from the integrative veterinary medicine fellowship at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine. (Part 2)
Views: 816 MercolaHealthyPets
Edie and her nasopharyngeal polyp removal. See how what this looks like and how big they can get.
 
02:57
Dr Magnifico is a small animal veterinarian who sees a lot of cats with polyps. This cat found me after her parents watched another one of my videos. Edie’s parents wanted someone to look for a polyp. The referring vet wanted her to see a specialist for endoscopy. If your cat has a chronic snore and nasal discharge please investigate for an oropharyngeal polyp. It may be the answer. For free pet help, or questions about this procedure ask me on Pawbly.com.
Views: 595 Krista Magnifico
Cat falling over, losing balance (new video) (neurologic disease)
 
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This is recent video (March 2014) of my 5-year old cat losing his balance from undiagnosed neurologic disease. The videos referenced below are from late 2013, so you can see the progression of the disease. His balance is getting worse and worse, but he doesn't seem to be in pain, his appetite is normal, and he still likes to play. And as you can see, he gets up and keeps going each time he falls. He's a fighter! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 49824 Susie Lorden
Cat having seizure (neurologic disease)
 
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Here is video of my 5-year old cat, Churro, having a seizure (or muscle spasm?). See his legs sticking straight out, trembling from his muscles tensed rock solid, his head strained backwards. The episode lasted until he's placed down on the floor. These episodes have been getting steadily worse over the last year or so, as his neurologic disease progresses. Sorry the video starts out blurry! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. This is in this video, and also there is a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q), but I haven't caught the full-body seizure on video; • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 24161 Susie Lorden
Zoonotic Diseases.wmv
 
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Do you live in an area with abundant wildlife around you? If so, here are a few things you should know about the diseases that wildlife can transmit to people (zoonotic diseases).
Views: 3156 Veterinaryinsider
#2 Cat losing balance, falling over, head bobbing (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 61516 Susie Lorden
Cat Asthma Attack -- what to look for in your kitty
 
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Poor Casper. After rescuing this big boy from the outdoors (his previous owner's abandoned him), we found him doing this strange cough. It didn't look like a hairball cough and happened often enough that it concerned us. So we took this video to show our vet. And sure enough, this is the telltale sign of kitty asthma. They also took X-rays to verify. This is what a feline asthma attack looks and sounds like. During an asthma attack, a cat will put his head down near the ground and stretch his neck out (like a seal). This is not a hairball cough. Feline asthma affects approximately 1% of the american domestic feline population. Casper is now taking a steroid, Prednisolone, daily which has helped to decrease the frequency of his attacks. If you see your cat doing this, take him to the vet for a check-up.
Views: 495696 MeowValet
Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis
 
10:03
http://healthypets.mercola.com/ Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses the symptoms of Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis and what to do if your cat experiences it.
Views: 18437 Mercola
Dr. Karen Becker Discusses Megacolon
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/11/26/megacolon.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses megacolon.
Views: 14216 MercolaHealthyPets
Veterinary Endoscopy: Nasal carcinoma in cat.
 
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Exhibition and retrograde biopsy of nasal carcinoma in cat using flexib\ le endoscope. www.ayoraendoscopiaveterinaria.es
Diseases caused by animals to human|Biology Terms
 
02:19
10 diseases can be caused by animals to human.1, Anthrax: Anthrax is an infection caused by the bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It can occur in four forms: skin, lungs, intestinal, and injection, Symptoms begin between one day and two months after the infection is contracted.2, Australian bat lyssavirus;Australian bat lyssavirus is a zoonotic virus closely related to rabies virus. It was first identified in a 5-month-old juvenile black flying fox (Pteropus alecto) collected near Ballina in northern New South Wales. 3, Brucellosis : Brucellosis is a highly contagious zoonosis caused by ingestion of unpasteurized milk or undercooked meat from infected animals, or close contact with their secretions.4,Cryptococcosis: Cryptococcosis, also known as cryptococcal disease, is a potentially fatal fungal disease. It is caused by one of two species; Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii.5 Giardiasis: Giardiasis is an infection in your small intestine. It's caused by a microscopic parasite called Giardia lamblia.6 Hydatid disease: Hydatid disease is a parasitic infestation by a tapeworm of the genus Echinococcus.7 Tetanus: Tetanus is caused by an infection with the bacterium Clostridium tetani, which is commonly found in soil, saliva, dust, and manure.8, Q fever: Q fever is a zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii, an obligate gram-negative intracellular bacterium. Cattle, sheep, and goats are the primary reservoirs for this disease. 9,Toxoplasmosis. 10 : elephantiasis : Lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, is a human disease caused by parasitic worms known as filarial worms. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Images under licence cc : www.pexels.com www.flickr.com commons.wikimedia.org pixabay.com
Views: 234 Biology Terms
Dr. Becker Interviews Dr. Turesky
 
20:41
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/05/27/cooked-meat-carcinogens.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, interviews Dr. Robert Turesky who works at NY's Environmental Health Sciences Division.
Views: 5588 MercolaHealthyPets
Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now
 
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Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now. Skimble stray six years cat who was begging food from people and many people ignored him- except one man, the man brought him to local vet . Skimble reached out to the rescue organization called Milo’s Sanctuary. and they agreed to take care of him. Michelle from Milo’s Sanctuary said Skimble was diagnosed with Cryptococcus, which is a severe fungal infection and it can several years before Skimble is free from the infection. The test result was negative, but it still could be in his system. he looks great after months of treatment and he is happy now, Skimble is now part of Milo’s Lifetime Care Program. and he will never live her life in the streets again. #cat #cats #cat_video ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For Any Copyright Issues Please Contact Us : [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mypetssite/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/mypetssite Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.com/mypetssite Tumblr : https://mypetssite.tumblr.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can download our application for pets wallpaper : https://goo.gl/S24sus ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.mypets.pet/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1444 My Pets
#5 Cat muscle spasm (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:30
This video shows my 5-year old cat with degenerative neurologic disease twitching when he lays down (at .3, .8, .18, .21, and .27 seconds in this video - though it's kind of hard to see in this video). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see THIS VIDEO at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 42778 Susie Lorden
Mycosis
 
05:06
Mycoses are diseases caused by fungi that affect both animals and humans. They are transmitted either by direct contagion or by indirect contagion, ie through contaminated environments and objects. They rarely lead to serious illnesses, but should not be underestimated to avoid further complications. Depending on the organs affected, mycosis can be classified into superficial mycoses (affecting skin, hairs and nails, such as ringworm) and deep mycosis (affecting internal organs, such as aspergillosis and cryptococcosis). The superficial mycoses are caused by skin fungi (dermatophytes) belonging to different genera. Microsporum canis is the most common cause for these mycoses in dogs and cats. It can also infect humans when these animals are introduced into the home, especially if they come from kennels and catteries.
Dr. Becker Discusses Canine Leptospirosis
 
07:32
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/02/25/canine-leptospirosis.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses canine leptospirosis, which is found in most domesticated and wild animals.
Views: 28258 MercolaHealthyPets
The Animals of Chernobyl | The New York Times
 
05:11
Biologist Timothy Mousseau has been studying the lasting effects of radiation on the flora and fauna of Chernobyl, Ukraine. Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n After the Chernobyl disaster humans haven't been allowed to live in the vicinity. That hasn't stopped animals and wildlife from moving into the radioactive area. Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/1o2H7Kf --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytvideo Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Instagram: http://instagram.com/nytvideo Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. The Animals of Chernobyl | The New York Timeshttp://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
Views: 7753763 The New York Times
Petting Brie
 
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Who loves pets? Brie loves pets! This lovely long haired Tuxedo girl is super affectionate and thinks that people and pets are the best thing in the world. # # # Seeking a good heart! Brie is in search of a good hearted person to foster her. You see, Brie has Cryptococcosis an infection caused by the yeast like fungus Cryptococcus which is widespread in the environment. Cryptococcosis is most common in cats but is also seen in dogs, cattle, horses, sheep, goats, birds, and wild animals. Brie has the fungus on her nose and has to be given one pill a day to fight it. She may be on this medication for anywhere from three months to a year. It just depends on how her body responds and heals. You would never know there was anything amiss with this gorgeous girl. Brie is extremely friendly and affectionate, rolling on her back for tummy rubs and swishing her huge tail in thanks for the attention. While the condition is technically “contagious,” only animals or people with weakened immune systems need be concerned about contracting the fungus. This may include the very young, the very old, those infected with HIV, persons with known illnesses, those under severe stress and those receiving chemotherapy or radiation treatment. Ideally Brie should be fostered in a home without other animals so her stress level can be kept to a minimum. At the shelter, the noise, other animals, constant foot traffic and periods without human contact add to her stress which negatively affects her immune system thus making it harder for her to recover quickly. By fostering Brie and helping her to recovery, you will be an integral part of moving her to our Adorable Adoptables list so she can find her forever home. Please note that PAWS will be responsible for all of her medical expenses. We can also provide you and Brie with food and other supplies. If you are interested in fostering Brie, please complete the Cat Foster Application. If you have any questions, please contact the Cat Adoption Team online or call Bob at 619-840-9727. Brie’s Stats Female Cat, 2 Years Old, DLH, Tuxedo, Shots Up To Date, Spayed, Microchipped, Tested for FELV, FIV & Parasites
Views: 159 Friendliest Paws
#1 Cat falling over, losing balance (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 3908 Susie Lorden
Cat Reiki - Recovers from Leprosy
 
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Interview by Valee More, Reiki Teacher with Maggie Tarver owner of Nefi who had leprosy from the age of around 2 years old. http://reikihealing-info.com/reiki-for-pets--courses.html
Views: 205 Valee More
Removing a Tumor Under the Skin: Mast Cell Tumor Cat
 
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Sylvester was diagnosed with a mast cell tumor from under the skin on his legs. Fortunately, the tumor which can spread in dogs, is relatively benign in cats.
Views: 14036 Greg Martinez DVM
Feline Asthma - What It Sounds Like ....
 
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My little cat, Leo, has been doing this for the last hour. It's 1am and we won't be able to take him to the vets until the morning....
Views: 14131 mralan1969uk
Rabies Encephalitis in dogs and cows
 
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Rabies is a viral disease that causes inflammation of the brain in humans and other mammals. Rabies is caused by lyssaviruses, including the rabies virus and Australian bat lyssavirus. Rabies is spread when an infected animal scratches or bites another animal or human. Saliva from an infected animal can also transmit rabies if the saliva comes into contact with the eyes, mouth, or nose. (Wikipedia) Anatomy and histology of dog brain: http://vanat.cvm.umn.edu/brainsect/levels.html?1 Rabies in cow: https://www.askjpc.org/wsco/wsc_showcase4.php?id=dmxveERCZjlmOVdvbUVRcTNMVEpxdz09 Rabies in mink: https://www.askjpc.org/vspo/show_page.php?id=aWM4bnAvTGJRRjhuUUZhR1A0K2FXdz09
Views: 520 Pathology Dynamics
Bio Project: Fungi Music Video :)
 
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C Gattii Music Video Music Video: The name's Gattii... Cryptococcus Gattii... To the tune of Lady Gaga- Bad Romance Rah-rah-ah-ah-ah! Roma-Roma-ma-ah! Crypt-toc-co-oh-cu-us Watch out bad fungus. Crypt-toc-co-oh-cus Cyptoc-cocus-gat-ii Crypt-oc-co-oh-cus Watch out bad fungus... The name's C Gattii, C Gattii for short, Encapsulated Yeast In free-roaming spores My genus is Crypt-toc-co-cus Yeast-like fungus Basidiomycota Yes that's my phylum Cause Teleomorph's my reproductive stage Tremellomycetes Yes that's my class Because I am so filamentous Filobasidiella Bacillispora's my Teleomorph Filamentous fungus Is why I am a Tremellomycete Crypt-toc-co-oh-cus Cyptoc-cocus-gat-ii Crypt-oc-co-oh-cus Watch out bad fungus... (one min mark) Tune of Akon-Dangerous Hey Cryptococcus gattii, your genotype, is so different! Since most species from your genus Cryptoccocus is so Harmless and, live in the soil, So why are you a pathogen? You are so DANGEROUS C. Gattii's so DANGEROUS That fungi's a bad one, in humans and animals Dangerous Just like C neoformans Still C Gatti's the worst one, yea To the tune of Katy Perry- California Gurls C Gattii's traveled the world Moving from different tropical coasts, Once it reached Vancouver, it spread to mainland BC And, the rest of Canada C Gatti, the fungus inescapable Airborne spores, carried kilometers But it's not, transmitted physically So-even-if-you-stay-home-you-might-not-be-safe (The victim of C.Gattii is not directly contagious because the spores are airborne and are not passed on physically but through the air as well as environment) C Gatti, the fungus which first grew on trees From BC to Pacific Northwest Even in the US, it is spreading now Spores in the air, soil, water, everywhere! To the tune of Jason Derulo- In My Head In your lungs, that's where C Gattii can reign If inhaled, respiratory failure, It gives you, Pulmonary Cryptococcosis, (and) In your brain, it'll also give you Cerebral Cryptococcomas This disease (-vid- list of different problems: deadly disease, seizures, neurological deficit, skin infections, lymph nodes, joints and bone infections) (-vid- 2001...) To the tune of Taylor Swift- Mine Vancouver Scientists sitting there by their laboratories, Finally figured out, for the first time, C Gatti gave cats dogs, sheep, even koalas. The very worst breathing difficulties With running noses and even nervous system problems, Bumps in their skin and with no solution C Gatti was the fungus, which eluded all How could it survive in these temperate climates? They said "global warming?!" (Scientists believe it is due to global warming which recently allowed this fungus to spread so rapidly) Infecting so many people... (Infected at least 216 people from 1999-2008) And treatment lasting several weeks (therapy lasted 6-8 weeks with drugs OR surgery and antifungals; fungal drugs including oral Flucytosine, Fluconazole and Amphotericin B) But now, they've found, It is killed by cold... (The fungus can be killed through freezing it) So now collaboration of researchers all o'er the world Has come together to solve, this big mystery With no possible protective measures except To go through intensive therapy (X-ray and antigen test taken before treatment; performed on blood or C(erebral) S(pinal) F(luid)) To the tune of Jason Derulo- In My Head This life-threatening fungal disease is so rare Lethal and deadly, it'll give you a scare Infecting the healthy, no fungus compares, And now it's in Canada, Canada C Gattii Organism Collectors everywhere, oh-oh Aint C Gattii the fungus you're looking for, oh oh You aint gon find a chance like this, no-oh I gotta specimen for you, oh oh To the tune of Justin Bieber-Somebody to Love Cause C Gattii needs someone to love, It, Doesn't need much Just, an agar plate and such.... C Gattii needs someone to love.... Woahhh... Add C. Gattii to YOUR prestigious collection! You can buy one at your nearest Jamieson Lab today! Jamieson Inc is not responsible for any ailments, illnesses, deaths, side effects of symptoms associated with the culturing of this fungus.
Views: 2975 Giovanna Ngai
Rhinoscopy in a cat , ventral nasal cavity
 
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СD диск - Введение в эндоскопию кошек и собак Обложка: Black box (твёрдая), в цвете Качество печати обложки и диска: лазерное Общая продолжительность: 1 час 45 мин Состоит из: 20 видеоклипов (эндоскопия пищевода и желудка кошек и собак (6 клипов),эндоскопия толстой кишки кошки и собаки (2 клипа), лапароскопии кошки и собаки (5 клипов), торакоскопии кошки и собаки (3 клипа), вагиноскопия собаки, цистоуретроскопия собаки, отоскопия собаки, артроскопия собаки) Клипы оригинально смонтированы для адекватного восприятия внешней и внутренней работы врача. Все клипы полностью озвучены по ходу работы с описанием нормы и найденных изменений. Стоимость: 1 т.р. включая доставку Приобрести диски можно сделав заявку по т\факс 8(3522) 254152, 8(3522) 254064, E-mail: [email protected] Форма оплаты любая. Контактное лицо -- Костюкова Екатерина Михайловна, Мурзина Наталья Павловна Подробная информация на www.endovet.su (раздел "Эндовет продакшн"). Необходимые вещи для специалистов http://endovet.su/magazin/
Views: 361 Alexandr Chernov
Toxoplasmosis and Mind Control - Plain and Simple
 
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The parasite that controls your brain... or maybe not so much. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/user/elsevetchannel?sub_confirmation=1 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Else-Vet/1500749850142258?ref=hl Twitter: Nope More info: My previous video about Toxoplasma biology, cats and pregnancy: https://youtu.be/U9MU-FxsKRg A summary of recent findings regarding the topic: http://prfdec.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/toxomodel.pdf Latent toxoplasmosis and traffic accidents: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC117239/ http://www.fsijournal.org/article/S0379-0738(05)00601-8/abstract Changes in animal host behaviour: http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2007/01/11/schbul.sbl073.full.pdf Prolonged reaction times: http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayAbstract?fromPage=online&aid=82691&fileId=S0031182001007624 And the opposite – better reflexes: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0889159113005357 Schizophrenia and Toxo-positivity: http://schizophreniabulletin.oxfordjournals.org/content/33/3/729.short Changes in social behaviour in men and women: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0020751906002864 http://web.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/Tehul3.pdf http://web.natur.cuni.cz/flegr/pdf/money.pdf http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/per.838/abstract;jsessionid=4AB439B7DA0A2BC24E6DE656A7D3B246.f03t01?userIsAuthenticated=false&deniedAccessCustomisedMessage= Suicide rates in women with toxoplasmosis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3128543/ Special thanks to Deirdre Ashdown, Jeanette Obal and Lajos Rózsa for their awesome help! ______________________________________________________ Media not created by me: SFX from freesound.org (Creative Commons Zero licence): http://freesound.org/people/cognito%20perceptu/sounds/31676/ http://freesound.org/people/sagetyrtle/sounds/33986/ http://freesound.org/people/UncleSigmund/sounds/36328/ http://freesound.org/people/galeku/sounds/46938/ http://freesound.org/people/uzerx/sounds/60138/ http://freesound.org/people/mrmayo/sounds/77039/ http://freesound.org/people/SGAK/sounds/87564/ http://freesound.org/people/BMacZero/sounds/94121/ http://freesound.org/people/thefsoundman/sounds/118513/ http://freesound.org/people/Sempoo/sounds/125213/ http://freesound.org/people/CeebFrack/sounds/132593/ http://freesound.org/people/Cyberkineticfilms/sounds/135435/ http://freesound.org/people/myfreemickey/sounds/147630/ http://freesound.org/people/videog/sounds/149193/ http://freesound.org/people/kvgarlic/sounds/149418/ http://freesound.org/people/winsx87/sounds/152016/ http://freesound.org/people/klangfabrik/sounds/160002/ http://freesound.org/people/timgormly/sounds/162803/ http://freesound.org/people/Kneedless/sounds/167455/ http://freesound.org/people/couchHero/sounds/168910/ http://freesound.org/people/ninebilly/sounds/173008/ http://freesound.org/people/x86cam/sounds/177769/ http://freesound.org/people/Mixedupmoviestuff/sounds/179222/ http://freesound.org/people/jamesrodavidson/sounds/192365/ http://freesound.org/people/crashoverride61088/sounds/193610/ http://freesound.org/people/martinimeniscus/sounds/199332/ http://freesound.org/people/BlenderDiplom/sounds/201094/ http://freesound.org/people/SoundsExciting/sounds/204363/ http://freesound.org/people/ngruber/sounds/204777/ http://freesound.org/people/Planman/sounds/208111/ http://freesound.org/people/djnicke/sounds/208759/ http://freesound.org/people/nick121087/sounds/232176/ http://freesound.org/people/squareal/sounds/237375/ http://freesound.org/people/Celticvalkyria/sounds/240665/ http://freesound.org/people/audiosmedia/sounds/243519/ http://freesound.org/people/hintringer/sounds/249926/ http://freesound.org/people/lwdickens/sounds/261224/ http://freesound.org/people/gabbermikeg/sounds/266034/ http://freesound.org/people/HaraldDeLuca/sounds/266839/ http://freesound.org/people/jobel0092/sounds/268056/ http://freesound.org/people/Coral_Island_Studios/sounds/277670/ SFX and music from the Youtube Audio Library: 1940's Slow Dance (Doug Maxwell) Bitters at the Saloon (Bird Creek) Brown Bag (Silent Partner) Day of Recon (Max Surla) Into the Depths - sting (Jingle Punks) Pop - SFX
Views: 43541 Else-Vet
Nail fungal infection treatment
 
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Best treatment for nail fungal infection. Best treatment for fungal nail infection. File down the nail and apply lotion to area. Keep clean and dry. Nail will grow back. Gel nails can cause Fungal nail infection because the nail is not able to Breathe. Subscribe to our channel please. Also take a look at Athletes foot treatment on YouTube https://youtu.be/99ggsDjUdg0 Take a look at my BOOKS by Esther Loftus Gough. Our channel is about pets, our cats and rescue dog and life events. SUBSCRIBE And enjoy our channel. Esthersuz is from a writers family and loves to write. She is the published author of; BLUE IN THE TOOTH- teeth hygiene with a colour therapy twist! (ARABIC AND ENGLISH TRANSLATION) AUNTIE BERTIE AND THE FLYING CIRCUS MOUSE-with a colour therapy twist! Colourful, fun, educational books written by Esthersuz who is a trained colour therapist and counselling consultant. An uplifting, fun, colourfully illustrated way to end the day with a bedtime story. TAKE A LOOK AT OUR WEBSITE ABOUT COLOUR THERAPY TODAY Also look at the books to buy. Bring a smile to your Children's faces. Order for Christmas and enjoy. Now working on JOKES ON THE SLOPES- colouring-in therapy twist! ADULTS COLOURING IN BOOK. 👍 http://www.colourtherapytwist.co.uk www.amazon.com/author/estherloftusgough www.auntiebertiesadventures.com INSTAGRAM https://instagram.com/esthersuz/ TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/Esthersuz
Views: 49 Esther Suz
UPDATE VIDEO for Mr. Sniffles!
 
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Meet, Mr. Sniffles, who was discovered in a feral colony in North Hollywood. The area is a congested, industrial neighborhood... lined with busy garages and warehouses that manufacture tile, paint products and automotive parts. God knows where these poor creatures hide during the day or find shelter from the elements. There's not much "green space". Instead, their environment consists of broken glass, toxic chemicals, wooden pallets, debris, dumpsters, and large, commercial vehicles and trucks. My friend, Jade Katona, has been feeding at this location for a couple of years and I've often accompanied her so I could trap the ones that needed to be spayed/neutered or required medical attention. Mr. Sniffles started coming out to eat from behind a gated alley and we immediately knew something wasn't right. He appeared to have a lump on his head, between his eyes, which was beginning to distort his features. We could also hear his labored breathing. I knew we needed to get him examined by a vet and made a plan to trap him. He was first taken to FixNation where he was neutered, vaccinated, and given a topical flea medication. The veterinary staff examined him (standard protocol for the clinic). Their basic diagnosis was that he had some kind of mass in his nasal cavity, which was beginning to cause facial deformity and restricting the air flow through his nose. Since this particular clinic focuses, mainly, on sterilizing community cats, it was recommended I take him to another veterinary practice for further assessment. Many, within the rescue community, began weighing in and some recommended, since he's a "feral" - that he be humanely euthanized. As you can see, by the video, he "was" a feral cat... in the beginning. But since he's been in captivity and been handled often for exams, he's not only become tame... but an extremely affectionate and social fella who LOVES to get scruffs around his head, face and neck! He's also become quite chatty. Mr. Sniffles also has a constant, nasal drip (hence his name!) and when he sneezes or shakes his head, green mucous flies through the air, splattering on the walls and floors, covering everything in his surroundings. I quickly realized his food bowl needed to be shallow because the kibble beneath would get saturated within a day or two, and go to waste. His food/water dishes and entire enclosure must be cleaned regularly... and most items need a good soaking in hot, soapy water. Does it gross me out? No. Does he have a funky smell? Yes. But all you have to do is meet Mr. Sniffles and experience him looking directly in to your eyes - as if he's saying, "I want to LIVE!" - and you'll feel how strong of a life force he possesses! And he's still enjoying the simple things in life... like his nightly bowl of wet food, getting brushed, hangin' out in his hammock or just being in the company of us human types. Typically, cats will lose their appetite if they can't smell. Although his nostrils are extremely constricted, he's still able to breathe through his nose. We're worried he may go downhill if his nose becomes completely blocked. Back to the medical stuff... We have since taken him to three, different veterinarians for further assessment and lab work. The first test conducted was for Cryptococcus (a fungal infection spread by bird droppings) and the results were negative. He's also had a full blood panel run... ruling out FIV/FeLV and other illnesses. According to Dr. Sunada (North Hollywood Animal Care Center), some of his protein(?) levels were elevated which could be consistent with what we may find in an animal fighting cancer. But she also noted that we cannot possibly diagnose him without conducting a biopsy and a MRI. Unfortunately, the growth is behind solid bone and there's no way to get a needle in to the target area. Dr. Sunada recommends he be taken to a specialist for facial surgery... in order for a biopsy to be done. After phoning multiple clinics, researching the costs of such a procedure, we realized it is just beyond our financial means. This is why we NEED YOUR HELP!!! Please... won't you help us help Mr. Sniffles?!! Time is of the essence because his condition is only worsening with time. You can find additional photos and updates on Mr. Sniffles on our Face book page: "Save The Leadwell Kitties". Just search the albums and he's in the one entitled, "Rhae's Rescue Cats #11 of 13". And we thank you, so deeply, from the bottom of our hearts. *Please be sure to follow the latest update on Mr. Sniffles on his GoFundMe campaign at gofundme.com/helpmr-sniffles. Thanks!
Views: 97 Rhae 2TheResQ
Feline Focal Seizure Post-ictal Lethargy
 
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FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 34 C Con
Feline focal seizure Post-ictal phase
 
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FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 46 C Con
#3 Cat losing balance, wobbles (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in THIS VIDEO; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 2404 Susie Lorden
AAH, #32 Do I need to worry about Toxoplasmosis?
 
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Dr. Cahill responds to an NPR new article about Toxoplasmosis gondii and cats. https://www.facebook.com/AcademyAnimalHospital?ref=hl
Views: 176 Michelle Cahill
#4 Cat, head dropping (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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This video shows my 5-yr old cat's head dropping down to the ground after he's been looking up. (It's one of many symptoms of his degenerative neurologic disease). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (THIS VIDEO) and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 1700 Susie Lorden
Dr. Becker Interviews Dr. Michael W. Fox
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/ Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian interviews Dr. Michael W. Fox about the book Healing Animals & The Vision of One Health.
Views: 376 MercolaHealthyPets

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