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Water Science Careers: Aquatic Entomology
 
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Kelly McIntyre describes her work as an aquatic entomology research technician at Stroud Water Research Center. Subscribe to freshwater science, environmental education, and watershed restoration news at http://www.stroudcenter.org/subscribe Follow Stroud Water Research Center Website: http://www.stroudcenter.org Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stroudcenter Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/stroudcenter Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/stroudcenter Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/2q7Z29l “My name is Kelly McIntyre and I’m an aquatic entomology intern at Stroud Water Research Center. In the spring we’ll go out into the field and collect samples of bugs from the stream and then we’ll bring them back to process. Throughout the rest of the year we’ll be in the lab, taking the bugs out of those samples and identifying them, which will give you an idea of how polluted a stream is or not. From there you can go and do restoration projects in the stream to help repair the quality of water there over time. I worked for the Alliance for Aquatic Resource Monitoring at Dickinson College during undergrad, which was my big introduction to field of aquatics. I have a bachelor’s degree in environmental science, and then right from undergrad I started as an intern here. I worked from May until January as an intern and then was hired full time. The best part of my job is actually working with something that I feel really passionate about and getting to go outside. Loving what I do and loving working with the people that I get to work with is really awesome.”
Pond Ecosystem for kids - Pond Ecology Facts & Quiz
 
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In this animation video,toddlers can learn pond ecosystem as per their lesson plan in the school.Full introduction about biotic and abiotic factors as well as consumers,producers and decomposers has been explained in a very interesting way.
Views: 139413 makemegenius
Clean Water Has Bugs In It - Stoneflies and Water Quality
 
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Clean water has bugs in it, says BYU Biology Professor Riley Nelson Stoneflies used as a tool to monitor water quality To fishermen, a stonefly is "bait," the kind that brings in the trophy fish. But to entomologist Riley Nelson, the stonefly is an important environmental indicator. If you see stoneflies in a river or stream, he says, the water is good. "Of all the insects that live in water, stoneflies are the kind that require the cleanest water," says Nelson, a Brigham Young University professor of biology. "Most people would be surprised to find out how many beautiful insects are in a stream, but a good stream is one that has bugs in it." Armed with beating sheets, sweep nets and other insect traps, Nelson has collected hundreds of species of Plecoptera (stonefly) in locations worldwide. He recently took a team of students to Mongolia for five summers, where they traveled the backwater and backcountry collecting aquatic stonefly nymphs and winged adults as part of the Mongolian Aquatic Insect Survey. The insect survey is part of an effort by the Mongolian government, working with the Philadelphia-based Academy of Natural Sciences, to monitor the environment and to train Mongolian scientists. In remote areas of the country, scientists are using stoneflies to assess water pollution levels without the expense of lab testing. "Because of this intolerance to pollution, stoneflies are regularly used by governments that want to know about the quality of their water and how to regulate that quality, to maintain it to be good for human use," says Nelson. As Mongolia faces industrialization and increased mining activity, the government there turned to Nelson and his students to identify aquatic species that might be used to monitor environmental change. "They are very concerned about the environment and a very high proportion of their lands are set aside as biological and nature preserves." In late 2012, Nelson and former BYU graduate student Sarah Judson published the first complete catalog of Mongolian stoneflies in the journal Zooataxa. The paper documents 51 species of stonefly, including five previously unknown to Mongolia and two new to science. The illustrated catalog lists habitat preferences of each species, making it possible to measure water quality without a laboratory. "About 51 species of stoneflies live in Mongolian streams and lakes. Any one stream may have maybe 20 species, so by seeing which of those are there we can know something very important about the water quality," he says. Nelson, a past recipient of the "Rolling Stonefly Award" from the North American Plecoptera Society, says if we pay attention to these indicator species, we will be better stewards of our environment. "As a stream becomes more polluted and we use it for what we deem to be worthy uses, we need to be careful to take care of the little things that rule the earth. I believe that it should be part of our stewardship to take care of them as well."
The Ecosystem | Educational Video for Kids
 
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The ecosystem Hello friends and welcome to a new Happy Learning video. Today we are going to learn about the ecosystems. But…do you know what an ecosystem is? An ecosystem is a community of living things in a given area. For example, this river is an ecosystem and is made up of water, the river bed, the river banks and all the living creatures which live in it, such as this frog, these lily pads or this shy duck which hides as soon as it sees us. An ecosystem can be very small, such as this puddle, or very big such as this enormous desert… The ecosystems are made up of two components: the Abiotic and the Biotic components. The Abiotic components include the non-living things like the ground, the climate, or the water and it determines which living things can survive in an ecosystem. For example a desert is a very dry place and so only animals and plants which can survive without much water can live there, like this slippery lizard or these humped back camels. On our planet there are loads of ecosystems, and they are divided into aquatic and terrestrial. (And these can be either aquatic or terrestrial) There are two types of aquatic ecosystems: freshwater and Marine. The freshwater ones are those which have freshwater such as rivers or lakes where Lily pads, otters, or frogs live…Whoops, and here are our friendly ducks again… The marine ecosystems are those found in the sea such as this beautiful colorful reef so full of life, fish, corals, octopuses and many more fascinating creatures. When talking about the terrestrial ecosystems we imagine prairies… large plains in the savanna were zebras or antelope like to graze…jungles where trees are extremely high and are the homes for these monkeys called orangutans…or even mountain ecosystems where there tends to be plenty of snow. Well now we know a bit more about ecosystems and as always, on behalf of Happy Learning we ask you to please look after them… they are so beautiful, we mustn’t destroy them. (We must preserve them) Goodbye friends and don’t forget to subscribe to Happy Learning
Views: 76215 Happy Learning English
Frogs for ponds
 
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Views: 255 Jane Gates
Tracks- Indicator Species  p. 13
 
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This video is about Tracks- Indicator Species p. 13
Views: 46 Boyce Films
Ecological futures are bleak for aquatic biota - Part (1)
 
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Millennium Conference - Case Studies: Ecological futures are bleak for aquatic biota in a western Great Plains river basin Subject to groundwater pumping and drought. Presenters: Jeff Falke and Kurt Fausch, Colorado State University
Views: 281 ESAVideos
Ecosystem in a jar
 
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This video is all within a 3 week time span, first few seconds are day one of experiment. I was curious from previous false bottoms videos on YouTube.
Views: 42 Games & Gadgets
Abiotic and Biotic Factors
 
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An ecosystem contains living and non living things. The ecosystem has many examples of the interaction between the living and non living. The living things in an ecosystem are called biotic factors. Living things include plants, animals, bacteria, fungi and more. The non living parts of an ecosystem are called abiotic factors. In an ecosystem some abiotic factors are sunlight, temperature atmospheric gases water and soil. One example of the interaction between abiotic and biotic factors is with plants. The plants use sunlight, water, and CO2 to make food. Without these abiotic factors plants would not be able to grow. Another example is the interaction between turtles and soil. Some turtles are known to bury themselves in soil. When the temperature becomes too hot turtles seek protection in the cool underground. Elephants and water interact as well. In order to stay hydrated elephants drink water. In fact all biotic factors need water to survive. Fish and temperature also show the interaction between living and nonliving. A fish's' body temperature matches it surroundings. warm tropical waters keep a tropical fish's body operating at an optional temperature. Another example is a fox and snow. When the temperature drops and snow starts to fall some foxes grow a white fur coat. The thick coat insulates and keeps the fox warm. Also the color matches it surroundings, an adaptation known as camouflage. Lastly Bacteria and soil interact. Bacteria are decomposers. Decomposers get energy by recycling dead organisms back into the ground. Nutrients enter the soil helping making the ground fertile. Take a look out of your window and try to identify interactions between abiotic and biotic factors
Views: 601460 Mark Drollinger
Habitat - CBSE NCERT Science
 
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Habitat - CBSE NCERT Science SuccessCDs Education ( https://www.youtube.com/successcds1 ) is an online channel focused on providing education through Videos as per CBSE, ICSE and NCERT syllabi upto Class 12 (K-12) for English, Hindi, Science, Social Science, Sanskrit and other subjects. Also visit our Channel for Entrance Exams in India FAQs & Application Process, GK & Current Affairs, Communication Skills Our website ( https://www.successcds.net ) is one of the leading portal on Entrance Exams and Admissions in India. Also Watch: http://goo.gl/rBhRT About this Video: THE HABITAT OF THE LIVING Its Types & Its Components HABITAT -- Living Place of an Organism Everything that surrounds living things and affects their growth and development is called environment. LIVING NON-LIVING HABITAT The natural surroundings where a living organism lives is called its Habitat. Habitat provides an organism with everything it needs to survive food, shelter and proper climatic conditions. POND RIVER FOREST WATER TYPES OF HABITAT TERRESTRIAL HABITAT TERRESTRIAL ORGANISMS AQUATIC HABITAT Aquatic organisms ARBOREAL HABITAT Arboreal organisms AERIAL HABITAT AMPHIBIOUS HABITAT Amphibians are animals like Frogs, Toads, Crocodiles which live both on land and water. COMPONENTS OF A HABITAT LIVING COMPONENTS/BIOTIC COMPONENTS THEY INCLUDE PLANTS AND ANIMALS NON-LIVING COMPONENTS ROCKS SOIL AIR TEMPERATURE WATER LIGHT Follow us: https://www.facebook.com/SuccessCD https://google.com/+successcds https://twitter.com/entranceexam https://twitter.com/successcds https://www.youtube.com/successcds1 https://www.youtube.com/englishacademy1
Views: 21919 SuccessCDs Education
Easy Origami Fish DIY - Easy Origami for Kids (Very Easy) - Summer Paper Crafts
 
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Easy Origami Fish DIY - Easy Origami for Kids - make origami in less than 5 minutes. We love 5 minute crafts. These easy paper fish, are great for greeting cards and collages. Wonderful Summer DIYs CLICK FOR INFO We ADORE Origami for Kids. Origami is such a great DIY to get into as all you require is a square piece of paper. Today we share this super easy fish origami pattern. Learn how to do Origami for kids today. This is a great Origami for Beginners project!!! More easy Origami for kids - http://bit.ly/2jXgkmm EVEN more Easy Origami for Kids - http://www.redtedart.com/easy-origami-for-kids/ More Summer DIYs - http://bit.ly/2oEiib9 Card Making DIY ideas - http://bit.ly/2mfd9Gl Be sure to check out all our easy origami for kids and easy origami for beginners. If you are looking for a specific Origami DIY and you can't find it, give me a shout and I will try and do you an easy Origami DIY video! SUBSCRIBE TODAY http://bit.ly/1NGL6bF CHECK OUT MY BOOK http://bit.ly/1Yl2LN6 FIND ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA Instagram https://www.instagram.com/redtedart/ Facebook https://www.facebook.com/redtedart/ Pinterest https://www.pinterest.com/redtedart/ Tumblr http://redtedart.tumblr.com/ Twitter https://www.twitter.com/redtedart/ G+ plus.google.com/+RedTedArt/ Music Credit - Epidemic Sound - Frogs Pond - Gunnar Johnsen
Views: 221481 Red Ted Art
√ Temperature tolerance in living things | English
 
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https://www.iitutor.com Temperature is one of the many limiting factors that can determine the presence of life on earth. Other limiting factors, include; sunlight, water, nutrients, oxygen, a balanced pH. Australian animals often have to cope with extreme environmental temperature and have developed many different adaptations to do this. Chemical reactions that occur in cells take place only within a relatively narrow range of temperatures, due to the sensitivity of enzymes. We have learnt that enzymes have an optimal range of temperatures at which they can function. For example, tissue temperatures greater than 42 are lethal to most organisms, as important enzymes begin to denature at this temperature – this results in a reduced ability to function. As a result, organisms live within a specific temperature range to survive. Endotherms’ Temperature Tolerance. Organisms which regulate their internal body temperature are restricted to: Living in places where the temperature of the environment is within the range of temperature over which their enzymes work. Only being active at times when the environmental temperature is close to the optimum temperature of their enzymes. Outside this range of temperatures, the enzymes would either be denatured, due to the temperature being too hot, or would be prevented from working by it being too cold. These species, which do not regulate their body temperature at a constant level, are called ectotherms. Many ectothermic animals have a limited ability to cope with different environmental temperatures. This is because they alter their body temperature using energy from the sun. For example, ectothermic species can bask in the sun to absorb the heat energy it provides. In many species a dark colour facilitates absorption of heat. These animals move into the shade during hot periods to prevent overheating. Because of an ectotherms ability to change its metabolism with the environmental temperature, they can live in a wider temperature range, however they remain inactive when it’s outside their optimal temperature. This temperature range in which a species can survive is termed its tolerance range for temperature and is usually only a few degrees outside the range at which the organism is comfortable. The great majority of living organisms are found in the 10°C to 35°C range and for each individual species the range is even narrower. Active plant growth in most plants occurs between 5-40°C. Below 0°C, cells risk ice crystals forming in them and above 45°C, proteins within cells may denature. Broad Temperature Range. The broad range of temperatures over which life is found. Life, in some form, can be found at extremes ranging from: -89°C, to 60°C in deserts, Up to 350°C (in hot vents in the sea) and In most aquatic environments (-2°C -30°C). Some living organisms have a high tolerance for extreme temperatures. Species that occupy habitats with extreme conditions (such as very hot water, ice or extreme salt conditions) are sometimes referred to as extremophiles. For example, the microorganism pyrolobus fumarii (hyperthermophilic microbe), grows optimally at 106°C in hydrothermal vents, and can withstand temperatures from 95°C - 113°C. Thermophilic bacteria called spirochete live in sulphurs volcanic hot springs such as Champagne pool (NZ). This bacteria can move by twisting like a corkscrew. However, individual species cannot survive in an environment with a temperature range this large; they need much narrower ranges. Why Organisms Live in a Narrow Temperature Range? Most species have a limited range of temperature over which they can survive and reproduce. Examples of Tolerance Ranges for Individual Species. Tolerance ranges for individual species; Water-holding frog 3 - 39°C, Platypus –8 - 34°C, Sydney blue gum Eucalyptus –1 - 34°C, Silky oak found in alpine regions 0 to 38°C. The most heat-tolerant animal known is the Pompeii worm, discovered in the 1980s. They live in tubes on the sea floor near hydrothermal vents and they show extraordinary tolerance to an extremely wide range of temperatures—they have been recorded living in water with the tail end at 80°C and the head end at 22°C. Research has shown Pompeii worms can withstand such extreme temperatures because of a fleece-like covering of bacteria on their backs. They have a symbiotic relationship with the bacteria—the worms secrete mucus from tiny glands on their backs to feed the bacteria, the bacteria protect worms from excess heat. Most organisms live within a narrow temperature range to survive. The great majority of living organisms are found in the 10°C to 35°C range. Organisms have a high tolerance for extreme temperatures are called extremophiles.
Views: 1350 iitutor.com
Silent Stream
 
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In the 1960's Rachael Carson wrote Silent Spring about the effects on pesticides on the environment. Now I have created a video called Silent Stream, which focuses our attention on the plight of aquatic creatures (especially amphibians) with poor stream quality. Today many synthetic compounds pollute the waters that both people and wildlife depend on. I hope we can rethink our overuse of these compounds and prevent an event such as a "Silent Stream" where there is no more wildlife.
Curious Kids: Lakes, Rivers & Estuaries
 
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As water flows from Lake Okeechobee down the Caloosahatchee River into the Charlotte Harbor estuaries and the Gulf of Mexico, it interacts with the health and wellbeing of all the ecosystems along the way. Curious Kids Jaden and Sophie spend a day with a Florida Fish & Wildlife Conservation Biologist to learn about Lake Okeechobee’s 6,000-year-old history. Andrew, Sierra and Eva discover how frogs and plants play an important role in keeping our coastal waters clean when they meet up with Florida Gulf Coast University’s Professor Win Everham at Corkscrew Regional Ecosystem Watershed. Jaden’s mom shares some quick and easy cleaning product recipes that refresh their home without harming the environment. Finally, a trip to meet Representative Heather Fitzenhagen gives Jamie some ideas for civic engagement on water quality and Sophie discovers how the Naples Botanical Garden is one big ‘rain garden’. Produced by Rosie Emery
Views: 1410 WGCUCuriouskids
Limiting Factors in an Ecosystem
 
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Limiting Factors in an ecosystemAny biotic or abiotic factor that restricts the number or production of organisms is a limiting factor. Take this ecosystem found in the fishbowl The limiting factors would be the size of the bowl, amount of water, will limit the number of fish that can survive in the fishbowl Limiting factors can be dependent limiting factors and independent factors Dependent limiting factors depend on the number of organisms For example, the amount of food available for each organism depends on the number of organisms An independent limiting factors does not depend on the number of organisms. For example, the amount of rainfall does not depend on the number of organisms You also have Density-Dependent Factors A limiting factor that depends on population size is called a density-dependent limiting factor. Density-dependent limiting factors include: • competition • predation • parasitism • disease Here is a list of abiotic limiting factors Sunlight Climate Temperature Water Space Soil chemistry Fire Natural disasters Biotic factors limiting factors Number of plants Number animals Amount of competition Number of decomposers parasites Disease causing agents
Aquatic Life v.s.  Terrestrial Colonization
 
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Lineages of frogs that evolved the ability to lay eggs on land, as opposed to in water, also had to evolve mechanisms to deal with the differences in biotic and abiotic components found in these environments. How can comparing glassfrogs and their behaviors give us further knowledge of plastic hatching?
Views: 2 arjuncollins
My Fish Tank | Paludarium Turtle | Aquascape | Terarium
 
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Paludarium atau disebut juga terarium Melihat biota biota yang ada di dalam aquarium aquascape dan paludarium tersebut yang unik
Views: 230 DAve Cribe
Ecosystems for children
 
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Ecosystems for children What is an ecosystem? This desert is an ecosystem This forest is an ecosystem This pond is an ecosystem, and under this rock is even an ecosystem. An ecosystem is a community of living and non-living objects in a particular area. Another name for living objects is biotic and nonliving objects is abiotic You can classify ecosystems several ways, but one method is to use the amount of rainfall and the type of soil. For example, the rainforest receives a large amount of rainfall each year. The plants and animals that live there have adapted to large amounts of rain and heavy vegetation. Some animals like this walking stick have extreme camouflage. These frogs like the dart frog are poisonous In an ecosystem, the communities can be divided into populations which are a group of one type of organism. These animals also have a home called a habitat There are also water ecosystems like a pond, lake, river, and ocean A small ecosystem could be and area under a rock is a micro-ecosystem. A medium size ecosystem like a large lake is a messo ecosystem. A Biome is a large ecosystem. Keywords: Ecology ecosystem organism producer consumer biology materials Plants terrestrial food chain food energy environment nutrients -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Study Skills Teacher's Secret Guide to your Best Grades" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f3bsg8gaSbw -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- * * For more Life Science videos and summaries see, http://www.moomoomath.com/Middle-School-Science-and-Biology.html You may also enjoy: Freshwater Ecosystems https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BwP1zxnKb14
Aquatic Species Competition - L5.4 CCE
 
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Aquatic Species Competition, from Aquatic Science STEM curriculum Lesson 5 (Aquatic Communities) closed captioned in English that includes topics: What are some of the basic survival needs of all living things? What is a population? What is a community? What is habitat? Why is it important? Why must organisms compete for resources? What is carrying capacity? What is a niche? Why is it important? What are invasive species? Why are they a problem? What is the source of energy for aquatic communities? How does energy circulate among organisms in an aquatic community? What is a food chain? What is a food web? What is an energy pyramid? What is a trophic level? How do predator and prey species keep species populations in balance in aquatic communities? What is natural selection? In what ways might food webs, food chains, and predator-prey relationships be different in a pond, an estuary, and the Gulf of Mexico? What happens when one piece is altered or removed? Dr. Rudolph “Rudy” Rosen is a professor in the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. Aquatic Science with Dr. Rudy Rosen Closed Captioned is the English language closed captioned version of an on-line video aquatic science curriculum arranged into 13 lessons in YouTube Playlists. Short videos covering important aquatic science topics can be used in teaching instruction or for self-education. Each lesson covers a major subject area and is broken down into short sub-topic video presentations. A comprehensive teaching guide and enhancements can be downloaded FREE here: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/learning/aquaticscience/teacher_guide.pdf The teaching textbook is published by the Texas A&M University Press and can be obtained here: http://www.tamupress.com/product/Texas-Aquatic-Science,7918.aspx or at Amazon here http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Science-Sponsored-Meadows-Environment/dp/1623491932 The instructional website is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/ Aquatic Science is a cooperative education project sponsored by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas Parks and Wildlife, and the National Science Foundation sponsored Research Coordination Network for Climate, Energy, Environment and Engagement in Semiarid Regions (RCN-CE3SAR). Some materials were adapted from or provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation.
"iBiome-Wetland" HD trailer
 
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Download and play "iBiome-Wetland" on your iPad or iPad Mini today! Please give us more stars in iTunes Store if you like it: https://itunes.apple.com/app/id900933868 Game description: With Professor Bio as your guide, come explore the wetland habitat and all the amazing species within. Build unique bio domes from scratch and interact with their fascinating food webs through immersive game play. Use what you learn to make your bio domes flourish with life. Features: + Explore 3 unique wetland habitats – fresh water marsh, salt water marsh and mangrove swamp + Unlock 50+ amazing species that live in the wetland habitat, covering 8 different categories from Crustacea, Molluscs, Insects, Birds, Reptiles, Fish, Amphibians to Mammals + Discover the biology within – the amazing food webs behind the scene, from the immersive gameplay + Build 4 beautifully illustrated bio domes from scratch + The ultimate challenge - make each dome flourish. No high scores, but rare badges and excitement are the rewards + Enjoy the vivid hand-drawn animations + Curriculum-based biology learning through exploration, discovery and problem solving + Biology concepts reinforced: ecosystems, energy and dynamics Next Generation Science Standard in Biology - MS-LS2 + No advertising + No in-app purchases
Views: 624 Springbay Studio
Living Things Change: Crash Course Kids #41.1
 
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Have you ever heard of the Peppered Moth? It's a great example of how living things can change because their environment has changed. And it's not just them! There used to be giant insects roaming the world, but they got smaller through time because their environments changed. In this episode of Crash Course Kids, Sabrina gives us some examples of how and why living things change because of their environments. Watch More Crash Course Kids: https://www.youtube.com/user/crashcoursekids ///Standards Used in This Video/// 5-LS2-1. Develop a model to describe the movement of matter among plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment. [Clarification Statement: Emphasis is on the idea that matter that is not food (air, water, decomposed materials in soil) is changed by plants into matter that is food. Examples of systems could include organisms, ecosystems, and the Earth.] [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include molecular explanations.] Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Crash Course Main Channel: https://www.youtube.com/crashcourse Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/thecrashcourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Credits... Producer & Editor: Nicholas Jenkins Cinematographer & Director: Michael Aranda Host: Sabrina Cruz Script Supervisor: Mickie Halpern Writer: Jen Szymanski Executive Producers: John & Hank Green Consultant: Shelby Alinsky Script Editor: Blake de Pastino Thought Cafe Team: Stephanie Bailis Cody Brown Suzanna Brusikiewicz Jonathan Corbiere Nick Counter Kelsey Heinrichs Jack Kenedy Corey MacDonald Tyler Sammy Nikkie Stinchcombe James Tuer Adam Winnik
Views: 292143 Crash Course Kids
How to Make a Fish with Recycled Materials
 
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http://crafts.123peppy.com/how-to-make-a-fish-with-recycled-materials/186 Let us Learn How to Make a Fish with Recycled Materials For Step by Step and Materials list for Fish with Recycled Materials Go to http://www.crafts.123peppy.com for more Crafts
Views: 114897 www123peppy
The Ecosystem of Disruption
 
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Amazon best selling author and "innovation provocateur" explains the Ecosystem of Disruption. To find out more about the ecosystem go to www.lindabernardi.com
Views: 1279 Linda Bernardi
Ecosystem in a Bottle
 
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An ecosystem includes all of the living things in an area that interact with each other and with their environments. In an ecosystem, each element has its own role to play. With Ecosystem in a Bottle, you discover the relationships between living organisms, and their environment.
Views: 45056 Monsanto Company
Tropical aquarium
 
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Life in my tropical aquarium 10 G
Views: 69 LblPunk
Neels Dream: Story of a Pond
 
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The film introduces the concept of Ecosystem to young students with an example of a small pond. A frog named Froggie, living in the pond and Neel, a young boy are two main characters. The film begins with Neel’s visit to the pond. While chatting and eating chocolates they begin to throw wrappers in the pond water. They are promptly scolded by a young nature lover. The whole episode is keenly observed by Froggie. The same night Neel gets a dream, in which Froggie appears. He becomes Neel’s friend and takes him on a tour of the Aquatic World. Thus, Neel’s journey to the exciting world of aquatic life begins. Froggie is his guide and Neel, eager to learn aspects of this entirely different living world. Froggie introduces Neel to the concept of Abiotic and Biotic factors of an Ecosystem. The journey continues by introducing more concepts like Prey, Predator, Food Chain, Food Web through attractive and self -explanatory visuals. It goes on to explain microscopic world of food producing Phytoplankton and first consumer Zooplankton which form the base of aquatic food chain. Froggie talks about Producers, Consumers and the Food Pyramid. He points out the interdependence of the components of the ecosystem and its fragile nature. The concepts explained in this film are a part of the syllabus (6th and 7th standard) and gives a clear message of environmental awareness.
Aquatic habitat - duck model version 2 | Thinktac
 
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Thinktac Videos: ► Subscribe to Thinktac: https://www.youtube.com/thinktac ► Circle us on G+:https://plus.google.com/+thinktac ► Like us on Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/thinktac Experiential science at school and at home, face-to-face and online, providing materials & resources to create, experiment, tinker, innovate and learn science.
Views: 30 ThinkTac
Aquatic Communities Summary Overview - L5.0 CCE
 
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Aquatic Communities Summary Overview, from Aquatic Science STEM curriculum Lesson 5 (Aquatic Communities) closed captioned in English that includes topics: What are some of the basic survival needs of all living things? What is a population? What is a community? What is habitat? Why is it important? Why must organisms compete for resources? What is carrying capacity? What is a niche? Why is it important? What are invasive species? Why are they a problem? What is the source of energy for aquatic communities? How does energy circulate among organisms in an aquatic community? What is a food chain? What is a food web? What is an energy pyramid? What is a trophic level? How do predator and prey species keep species populations in balance in aquatic communities? What is natural selection? In what ways might food webs, food chains, and predator-prey relationships be different in a pond, an estuary, and the Gulf of Mexico? What happens when one piece is altered or removed? Dr. Rudolph “Rudy” Rosen is a professor in the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. Aquatic Science with Dr. Rudy Rosen Closed Captioned is the English language closed captioned version of an on-line video aquatic science curriculum arranged into 13 lessons in YouTube Playlists. Short videos covering important aquatic science topics can be used in teaching instruction or for self-education. Each lesson covers a major subject area and is broken down into short sub-topic video presentations. A comprehensive teaching guide and enhancements can be downloaded FREE here: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/learning/aquaticscience/teacher_guide.pdf The teaching textbook is published by the Texas A&M University Press and can be obtained here: http://www.tamupress.com/product/Texas-Aquatic-Science,7918.aspx or at Amazon here http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Science-Sponsored-Meadows-Environment/dp/1623491932 The instructional website is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/ Aquatic Science is a cooperative education project sponsored by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas Parks and Wildlife, and the National Science Foundation sponsored Research Coordination Network for Climate, Energy, Environment and Engagement in Semiarid Regions (RCN-CE3SAR). Some materials were adapted from or provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation.
Improving Bioindicators Practice Presentation
 
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Improving Bioindicators: A New Weight-Length Model for Fish to Provide More Accurate Ecosystem Condition Assessment Thank you for taking the time to help me! This was filmed on a cell phone, so please forgive imbalance, some focus issues, and zoom issues. I'm sorry some of the tables are not readable, you'll just have to trust what I say about them! I hope it comes across how awesome AND relevant this project is. :)
Views: 164 Linda Powlison
Benthic macroinvertebrates
 
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Bugs from my pond. These came out of the Azolla I skimmed off
Views: 309 Mike Simonsen
wetlands song
 
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song about wetlands, while in the wetlands at our school
Views: 4719 MrScienceGeek
Stopping the Spread of Aquatic Invasive Species from the Pet and Pond Trades - The Current 39
 
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This edition of the The Current features Extension professionals from around the region discussing their successful efforts – and lessons learned – in blocking invasive aquatic species from trade channels including escape from private ponds and water gardens, "hitchhiking" or mislabeling.
The Great Aquarium Treasure Hunt - Promo
 
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Get ready for an exciting and educational experience! The students of South Town Middle School are ready for the coolest class field trip of the year to the National Aquarium. But this time there's a catch -- Science Teacher Mr. Hedgeman has turned it into a Treasure Hunt! What amazing things can they find and learn before time is up? Classmates Dewey and Trevor love a challenge, but will they figure out their clues and stay ahead of the other students -- especially Sloane - to win the grand prize? Join Dewey and Trevor on a wild exploration of the National Aquarium, home to thousands of species of marine life! In this fast paced adventure, meet the experts all throughout this aquatic world located in Baltimore's Inner Harbor. Find out what marine life is in the Chesapeake Bay, go "down under" to visit the crocodiles of Australia, discover the frogs of an indoor rainforest, and submerge yourself into the Atlantic and Pacific oceans for an up close look at the astounding array of deep sea life from sharks to rays to dolphins! In the end, Dewey and Trevor will explore the entire aquarium, but can they be the first team to have all the answers before it's too late? Find out in the exciting adventure of The Great Aquarium Treasure Hunt!
Views: 133 MPT National
√ Temperature Tolerance in Living Things | Biology
 
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#iitutor #Biology #TemperatureTolerancInLivingThings https://www.iitutor.com Temperature is one of the many limiting factors that can determine the presence of life on earth. Other limiting factors, include; sunlight, water, nutrients, oxygen, a balanced pH. Australian animals often have to cope with extreme environmental temperature and have developed many different adaptations to do this. Chemical reactions that occur in cells take place only within a relatively narrow range of temperatures, due to the sensitivity of enzymes. We have learnt that enzymes have an optimal range of temperatures at which they can function. For example, tissue temperatures greater than 42 are lethal to most organisms, as important enzymes begin to denature at this temperature – this results in a reduced ability to function. As a result, organisms live within a specific temperature range to survive. Endotherms’ Temperature Tolerance. Organisms which regulate their internal body temperature are restricted to: Living in places where the temperature of the environment is within the range of temperature over which their enzymes work. Only being active at times when the environmental temperature is close to the optimum temperature of their enzymes. Outside this range of temperatures, the enzymes would either be denatured, due to the temperature being too hot, or would be prevented from working by it being too cold. These species, which do not regulate their body temperature at a constant level, are called ectotherms. Many ectothermic animals have a limited ability to cope with different environmental temperatures. This is because they alter their body temperature using energy from the sun. For example, ectothermic species can bask in the sun to absorb the heat energy it provides. In many species a dark colour facilitates absorption of heat. These animals move into the shade during hot periods to prevent overheating. Because of an ectotherms ability to change its metabolism with the environmental temperature, they can live in a wider temperature range, however they remain inactive when it’s outside their optimal temperature. This temperature range in which a species can survive is termed its tolerance range for temperature and is usually only a few degrees outside the range at which the organism is comfortable. The great majority of living organisms are found in the 10°C to 35°C range and for each individual species the range is even narrower. Active plant growth in most plants occurs between 5-40°C. Below 0°C, cells risk ice crystals forming in them and above 45°C, proteins within cells may denature. Broad Temperature Range. The broad range of temperatures over which life is found. Life, in some form, can be found at extremes ranging from: -89°C, to 60°C in deserts. Up to 350°C (in hot vents in the sea) and in most aquatic environments (-2°C -30°C). Some living organisms have a high tolerance for extreme temperatures. Species that occupy habitats with extreme conditions (such as very hot water, ice or extreme salt conditions) are sometimes referred to as extremophiles. For example the microorganism pyrolobus fumarii (hyperthermophilic microbe), grows optimally at 106°C in hydrothermal vents, and can withstand temperatures from 95°C - 113°C. Thermophilic bacteria called spirochete live in sulphurs volcanic hot springs such as Champagne pool (NZ). This bacteria can move by twisting like a corkscrew. However, individual species cannot survive in an environment with a temperature range this large; they need much narrower ranges. Why Organisms Live in a Narrow Temperature Range? Most species have a limited range of temperature over which they can survive and reproduce. Examples of Tolerance Ranges for Individual Species. Tolerance ranges for individual species. Water-holding frog 3 - 39°C, Platypus –8 - 34°C, Sydney blue gum Eucalyptus –1 - 34°C, Silky oak found in alpine regions 0 to 38°C. The most heat-tolerant animal known is the Pompeii worm, discovered in the 1980s. They live in tubes on the sea floor near hydrothermal vents and they show extraordinary tolerance to an extremely wide range of temperatures—they have been recorded living in water with the tail end at 80°C and the head end at 22°C. Research has shown Pompeii worms can withstand such extreme temperatures because of a fleece-like covering of bacteria on their backs. They have a symbiotic relationship with the bacteria—the worms secrete mucus from tiny glands on their backs to feed the bacteria, the bacteria protect worms from excess heat.
Views: 942 iitutor.com
A Local Ecosystem 8.2.1.i) - Abiotic Characteristics
 
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This video addresses the following syllabus dot-point from 'A Local Ecosystem': - compare the abiotic characteristics of aquatic and terrestrial environments
Views: 1708 Khollis
What is CAPTIVE BREEDING? What does CAPTIVE BREEDING mean? CAPTIVE BREEDING meaning & explanation
 
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What is CAPTIVE BREEDING? What does CAPTIVE BREEDING mean? CAPTIVE BREEDING meaning - CAPTIVE BREEDING definition - CAPTIVE BREEDING explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Captive breeding is the process of breeding animals in controlled environments within well-defined settings, such as wildlife reserves, zoos and other commercial and noncommercial conservation facilities. Sometimes the process includes the release of individual organisms to the wild, when there is sufficient natural habitat to support new individuals or when the threat to the species in the wild is lessened. While captive breeding programs may save species from extinction, release programs have the potential for diluting genetic diversity and fitness. Captive breeding has been successful in the past. The Pere David's deer was successfully saved through captive breeding programs after almost being hunted to extinction in China. Captive-breeding is employed by modern conservationists, and has saved a wide variety of species from extinction, ranging from birds (e.g., the pink pigeon), mammals (e.g., the pygmy hog), reptiles (e.g., the Round Island boa) and amphibians (e.g., poison arrow frogs). Their efforts were successful in reintroducing the Arabian oryx (under the auspices of the Fauna and Flora Preservation Society), in 1963. The Przewalski's horse was also successfully reintroduced in the wild after being bred in captivity. The breeding of endangered species is coordinated by cooperative breeding programs containing international studbooks and coordinators, who evaluate the roles of individual animals and institutions from a global or regional perspective. These studbooks contain information on birth date, gender, location, and lineage (if known), which helps determine survival and reproduction rates, number of founders of the population, and inbreeding coefficients. A species coordinator reviews the information in studbooks and determines a breeding strategy that would produce most advantageous offspring. If two compatible animals are found at different zoos, the animals may be transported for mating, but this is stressful, which could in turn make mating less likely. However, this is still a popular breeding method among European zoological organizations. Artificial fertilization (by shipping semen) is another option, but male animals can experience stress during semen collection, and the same goes for females during the artificial insemination procedure. Furthermore, this approach yields lower-quality semen because shipping requires the life of the sperm to be extended for the transit times. Conservationists can use captive breeding to help species that are being threatened by human activities such as habitat loss and fragmentation, hunting, fishing, pollution, predation, disease, and parasitism. Endangered species are those on the verge of extinction and consequently are often very small populations. A risk of captive breeding includes inbreeding, i.e., mating between two closely related individuals, which can lead to offspring that are homozygous recessive for traits that may not have been visible in the parents. As a result, inbreeding may lead to decreased disease immunity and phenotypic abnormalities. This risk is heightened due to the small effective population size. Another consequence of small captive population size is the increased impact of genetic drift, where genes have the potential to fix or disappear completely, thereby reducing genetic diversity. In the case of captive breeding prior to reintroduction into the wild, it's possible that species will evolve to be adapted to their captive environment, rather than the environment that they will be reintroduced to. Selection intensity, initial genetic diversity, and effective population size can impact the degree to which the species adapts to its captive environment. Modeling works indicate that the duration of programs (i.e., time from the foundation of the captive population to the last release event) is an important determinant of reintroduction success. Success is maximized for intermediate project duration allowing the release of a sufficient number of individuals, while minimizing the number of generations undergoing relaxed selection in captivity. ....
Views: 1975 The Audiopedia
What is Ecosystem
 
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The Structure Of An Ecosystem There are many different factors and component of an ecosystem can be described using the following terms: Biosphere: the part of the Earth that is habitable. It is made up of many different kinds of natural habitat. Each habitat contains populations of their own plants and animal communities. Most of these are self-sufficient and have their own food and nutrient cycles. Habitat: a place where an organism lives. It chooses this place for many reasons including the fact there is food, shelter or it is hidden from predators. Some examples of habitats are woodland, seashore, grassland, rainforest, river or ocean. Community: the organisms that live within one of these habitats form a community. Population: the organisms of a certain species within the community, e.g. the frogs that live in rainforest are called the rainforest frog population. Ecological Niche: within each community each species either feeds on and/or is eaten by other species in the food web. Each species occupies and ecological niche. Biotic Factors: the living components of an ecosystem, e.g. plants, animals, microorganism and fungi. Abiotic Factors: the non-living components of an ecosystem, e.g. water, oxygen and ambient temperature. Interrelationships Within Ecosystems The main interaction between organism in an ecosystem is eating and being eaten. Relationships also exits between biotic and abiotic factors. IF YOU LIKED THE VIDEO LEAVE A LIKE AND IF YOU WANT TO SEE MORE AMAZING VIDEOS SUBSCRIBE TO MY CHANNEL.
Views: 942 Technotron705
Niches - L5.3
 
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Niches, from Aquatic Science STEM curriculum Lesson 5 (Aquatic Communities) that includes topics: What are some of the basic survival needs of all living things? What is a population? What is a community? What is habitat? Why is it important? Why must organisms compete for resources? What is carrying capacity? What is a niche? Why is it important? What are invasive species? Why are they a problem? What is the source of energy for aquatic communities? How does energy circulate among organisms in an aquatic community? What is a food chain? What is a food web? What is an energy pyramid? What is a trophic level? How do predator and prey species keep species populations in balance in aquatic communities? What is natural selection? In what ways might food webs, food chains, and predator-prey relationships be different in a pond, an estuary, and the Gulf of Mexico? What happens when one piece is altered or removed? . Dr. Rudolph “Rudy” Rosen is a professor in the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. His bio is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/rudolph-rosen-author-editor-texas-aquatic-science/ Aquatic Science Lessons with Dr. Rudy Rosen is an on-line video curriculum arranged into 13 lessons in YouTube Playlists. Each lesson covers a major subject area and is broken down into short sub-topic video presentations. These short videos covering important aquatic science topics can be used in teaching instruction or for self-education. A comprehensive teaching guide and enhancements can be downloaded FREE here: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/learning/aquaticscience/teacher_guide.pdf The teaching textbook is published by the Texas A&M University Press and can be obtained here: http://www.tamupress.com/product/Texas-Aquatic-Science,7918.aspx or at Amazon here http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Science-Sponsored-Meadows-Environment/dp/1623491932 The instructional website is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/ Aquatic Science is a cooperative education project sponsored by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas Parks and Wildlife, and the National Science Foundation sponsored Research Coordination Network for Climate, Energy, Environment and Engagement in Semiarid Regions (RCN-CE3SAR). Some materials were adapted from or provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation.
Yang jijik jangan dilihat kumpulan kecebong dalam kolam
 
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Video ini adalah kumpulan kecebong yang ada didalam kolam ikan hias.banyaknya kecebong yang berkembang biak didalam kolam ikan hias ini disebabkan karena banyaknya alga hijau yang tumbuh didalam kolam Kolam ini adalah kolam tempat penampungan anak ikan hias guppy.
Views: 374 Biota Aquatic
Class 6: Science (Chapter 9: The Living Organisms and Their Surroundings)
 
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This lecture covers NCERT Science Class 6 Chapter 9 The Living Organisms and Their Surroundings). In this following key terms are covered Adaptation, Aquatic habitat, Biotic component, Excretion, Growth, Habitat, Living, Reproduction, Respiration, Stimulus
Homeostatic Evolution
 
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021 - Homeostatic Mechanisms Reflect Evolution - Paul Andersen shows how homeostasis reflects of evolution through time. The endocrine system shows continuity through flatworms, earthworms and vertebrates. However the respiratory system shows change as organisms move onto land. The importance of the Tiktaalik fossil as a transitional fossil is emphasized. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing:Buhl, Vera. English: Grass, 55130 Laubenheim, Germany, September 15, 2008. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:2008-09-15_(14)_Grass,_Gras.JPG. Crondon.com. Earthworm - Excretion & Osmoregulations, n.d. http://cronodon.com/BioTech/Earthworm_excretion.html. en.wikipedia, Anilocra at. English: A Flame Cell and Tube Cell, the Excretory System of Flatworms, (original upload date). Transfered from en.wikipedia Transfer was stated to be made by User:Vojtech.dostal. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Flamecell.jpg. en.wikipedia, Mokele at. English: Diagram of Buccal Pumping in a Frog, April 12, 2009. Transferred from en.wikipedia by SreeBot. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Buccal_pumping.jpg. "File:Fishapod Evolution.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fishapod_evolution.jpg. "File:Gray1128.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Gray1128.png. File:Lampanyctodes Hectoris (Hector's lanternfish)2.png, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lampanyctodes_hectoris_(Hector's_lanternfish)2.png. File:Mouse.svg, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Mouse.svg. "File:Neil Shubin.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Neil_Shubin.jpg. "File:Pseudoceros Dimidiatus.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pseudoceros_dimidiatus.jpg. "File:Thoracic Anatomy.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Thoracic_anatomy.jpg. "File:Tuna Gills in Situ Cut.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Tuna_Gills_in_Situ_cut.jpg. "File:Urinary System.svg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Urinary_system.svg. Foundation, Zina Deretsky, National Science. English: Life Restoration of Tiktaalik Roseae, a Transitional Fossil ("missing Link") between Sarcopterygian Fishes and Tetrapods from the Late Devonian Period of North America. Original Description: "Fossil Fish Bridges Evolutionary Gap between Animals of Land and Sea.," Unknown. National Science Foundation. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tiktaalik_roseae_life_restor.jpg. Mokele. English: Lateral View of Lungs of a Dissected Protopterus Dolloi, February 15, 2009. Transferred from en.wikipedia. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Lungs_of_Protopterus_dolloi.JPG. Schneider, Kenneth Cole. Earthworm Macro 20100515, May 15, 2010. http://www.flickr.com/photos/rosyfinch/4612063657/. User:Tannin. English: Australian Lungfish (Neoceratodus Forsteri), [object HTMLTableCellElement]. Picure taken by Tannin (from English wikipedia). http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Australian-Lungfish.jpg. Wknight94. Still Water in Tracy Arm, Southeast of Juneau, Alaska., August 4, 2009. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tracy_Arm_calm_water_closeup.jpg. "Αρχείο:2 Panthera leo.jpg." Βικιπαίδεια. Accessed November 19, 2013. http://el.wikipedia.org/wiki/%CE%91%CF%81%CF%87%CE%B5%CE%AF%CE%BF:2_Panthera_leo.jpg. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 43139 Bozeman Science
Ponds - L9.3
 
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Ponds, from Aquatic Science STEM curriculum Lesson 9 (Lakes and Ponds) that includes topics: Where are ponds and lakes in your community? What role do they play in your economy? How are lakes similar to ponds? How are they different? What kind of organism makes up the greatest amount of living material in a pond? Besides providing food, what other roles do plants have in lake and pond ecosystems? How are plants that live under water similar to plants that live on land? How are they different? How do temperature and oxygen levels in ponds change during each 24-hour period? How do ponds change over time? What are the benefits and costs of building new reservoirs as a solution for Texas’ future water needs? . Dr. Rudolph “Rudy” Rosen is a professor in the Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University. His bio is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/rudolph-rosen-author-editor-texas-aquatic-science/ Aquatic Science Lessons with Dr. Rudy Rosen is an on-line video curriculum arranged into 13 lessons in YouTube Playlists. Each lesson covers a major subject area and is broken down into short sub-topic video presentations. These short videos covering important aquatic science topics can be used in teaching instruction or for self-education. A comprehensive teaching guide and enhancements can be downloaded FREE here: http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/publications/learning/aquaticscience/teacher_guide.pdf The teaching textbook is published by the Texas A&M University Press and can be obtained here: http://www.tamupress.com/product/Texas-Aquatic-Science,7918.aspx or at Amazon here http://www.amazon.com/Aquatic-Science-Sponsored-Meadows-Environment/dp/1623491932 The instructional website is here: http://texasaquaticscience.org/ Aquatic Science is a cooperative education project sponsored by The Meadows Center for Water and the Environment at Texas State University, Harte Research Institute for Gulf of Mexico Studies at Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi, Texas Parks and Wildlife, and the National Science Foundation sponsored Research Coordination Network for Climate, Energy, Environment and Engagement in Semiarid Regions (RCN-CE3SAR). Some materials were adapted from or provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation.
BioBlitz 2013: Bayou Ecosystem
 
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Learn about the Louisiana wetlands in this first in a series of videos shot at the 2013 National Geographic/National Park Service BioBlitz at Jean Lafitte National Historical Park and Preserve, May 17th and 18th.
Views: 1183 ScienceNetLinks