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Situation Critical - S01E12 - Coal Mine Disaster
 
47:29
At the Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, coal miners accidentally dug into the poorly documented Saxman Mine, causing 500 million tonnes of underground water to flood the Quecreek mine. All nine miners trapped by the water were eventually rescued.
Views: 462583 GFS Valhalla
Abandoned Coal Mining Remains - Glen Burn Colliery - Shamokin Pa
 
40:10
►Please Subscribe https://goo.gl/7t6Eqc ►Facebook https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 ►Don't forget to hit the like button ►Watch Bernie's video here https://goo.gl/QzLQeV Hiding behind the foliage and trees on the side of a mountain lies the remains of a huge operation. It went by several names but most recently known as the Glen Burn mine company. It operated for over 130yrs and even had a coal mine tour for the public in the later years of operation. The back strip mine area still seems to be operational but everything else seems to be getting reclaimed by mother nature. Enjoy
Views: 8764 JPVideos
knox mine disaster location and footage
 
05:32
Please like & subscribe to JP Videos This video shows the location of the knox mine disaster and shows how it looks today as well as footage from 1959. enjoy Don't forget to like my page https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 At approximately 11:20 a.m., two laborers in the Pittston vein heard a sharp “popping” sound. They quickly called upon John Williams, the assistant foreman. The three employees hurried to escape and notify superintendent Robert Groves, who immediately ordered an evacuation, although he withheld the severity of the situation. Unfortunately, the other three men who were stationed in this vein could not escape in time and the fierce waters of the Susquehanna took their lives. While millions of gallons of water flooded into the mine, thirty-three men managed to catch the last elevators at the May shaft, but forty-five others remained trapped, desperately seeking their own outlet. During the first sixty four hours of the emergency, an estimated 2.7 million gallons of water per minute streamed underground from an enormous whirlpool near the riverbank. Down below, thirty-two men wandered in two separate groups until they managed to escape through the abandoned Eagle air shaft. Pennsylvania Coal Company surveyor, Joe Stella, led the first group of seven. He not only knew the mines well, but also possessed maps which allowed his group to find a direct course to the opening. The second group, led by Myron Thomas, consisted of twenty-five men who wandered for hours before they found their way to safety. Unfortunately, twelve of the original remaining bodies have never been recovered. Thousands of bails of hay and hundreds of railroad ties were also added. Culm, dirt, and rock along with over 50 coal and railroad cars barely stopped the river. Finally they diverted the river around Wintermoot Island by building dams at both ends of the island. Once they pumped the water out between the dams the size of the hole was evident. Tons of clay and rock were poured into the hole and a concrete cap was placed on top of the opening. They then pumped much of the water out of the mine to look for the 12 missing miners. How could this tragedy have happened? The original plan was to keep 50 feet of rock and coal between the workings and the river bottom. The Knox company wanted this to be lowered to 35 feet. Mine inspectors deemed this ok as it would be sufficient to stand up to the river. At this point the seam of coal sloped up towards the river in what is known as an anticline. Company owners kept pushing the miners closer and closer to the river bottom until the rock could no longer support the river. At the point where the river broke through the rock was only 5 to 6 feet thick! This disaster ended deep mining in the Wyoming valley as almost all of the coal company’s mines connected.
Views: 67428 JPVideos
Coal Mine Blast in China Kills Fifteen
 
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ANCHOR: Todays' top story: in China there have been more deaths in the mining industry. Fifteen coal miners have perished in a gas explosion at the Changlong mine in Qitaihe City, Heilongjiang Province. Three members of a mine rescue team died in a cave-in today while trying to retrieve the bodies of the miners. Authorities say the privately owned mine was operating legally at the time of the accident. The cause of the blast is still under investigation. Chinas mining industry is the deadliest in the world. In the first 10 months of this year, almost three thousand Chinese miners have died in explosions, gas leaks, flooding and cave-ins.
Views: 676 NTDTV
How Coal Mines Work: "Mining and Preparation of Anthracite Coal" c 1934 Delaware & Lackawanna Coal
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Very good demonstration of coal mining processes in the 1930s. 'Underground mining scenes... Sequence shows miners leaving work, washing up and going home to greet families.' NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jo9qxONgd4s Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite (Greek ἀνθρακίτης (anthrakítes), "coal-like," from ἄνθραξ (ánthrax), coal) is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%. The term is applied to those varieties of coal which do not give off tarry or other hydrocarbon vapours when heated below their point of ignition. Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the majority of global production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal... blind coal... Kilkenny coal... crow coal... and black diamond. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region. Legend has it that Allen fell asleep at the base of Broad Mountain and woke to the sight of a large fire because his campfire had ignited an outcropping of anthracite coal. By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River. Anthracite was first experimentally burned as a residential heating fuel in the US on 11 February 1808, by Judge Jesse Fell in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on an open grate in a fireplace. Anthracite differs from wood in that it needs a draft from the bottom, and Judge Fell proved with his grate design that it was a viable heating fuel. In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917... From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States, until it was supplanted first by oil burning systems and more recently by natural gas systems... China today mines by far the largest share of global anthracite production, accounting for more than three-quarters of global output. Most Chinese production is of standard-grade anthracite, which is used in power generation. Increased demand in China has made that country into a net importer of the fuel, mostly from Vietnam, another major producer of anthracite for power generation, although increasing domestic consumption in Vietnam means that exports may be scaled back. Current U.S. anthracite production averages around 5 million tons per year. Of that, about 1.8 million tons were mined in the state of Pennsylvania...
Views: 37208 Jeff Quitney
Protests in Kenya over plans to introduce new coal mines
 
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(5 Jun 2018) Dozens of activists opposed to the development of coal-fired power plants took to the streets of Nairobi on Tuesday. A Chinese company is tipped to help finance and construct the proposed plant in the historic port town of Lamu, whose old town is a listed UNESCO World Heritage site. There are also plans to develop plants at Mui Basin in Kitui county. Kenyan government officials say the plants will help meet the country's growing electricity demands. Critics say the plans goes against Kenya's commitment to comply with its Paris climate accord targets. Activists worry coal mining would damage marine resources and pollute the environment. "Coal plants, the usage of coal, is an outdated technology, which is not clean," said activist Faisal Mohammed. The executive director at Haki Africa, a human rights organisation, said China is not acting in solidarity with Kenya in pursuing the constructions. "China is here for its own personal benefit. It is unfortunate that our country and our government is accepting to be lied to and to be cheated by China," said Hussein Khalid. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/fced1cb67683986a5b4d0f4fd7e57346
Views: 108 AP Archive
Burning Ghost Town In Centralia, Pennsylvania
 
02:53
If you thought the horror movie Silent Hill was fiction, you should visit Centralia, Pennsylvania. This abandoned ghost town has had a fire burning underground for over 50 years! Due to constant spontaneous combustion and oxidation, this mysterious old coal mine is completely out of control! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most SHOCKING Biological Weapons Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/W0Yli9y7YAk Watch our "Top 5 Most Mysterious and Powerful Secret Societies" video here: https://youtu.be/0Lu4Uvc5EhA Watch our "DEADLIEST Ship Disaster In History!" video here: https://youtu.be/8cNBVZMoalc Town literally burning for more than 50 years! There is a small town in Pennsylvania that has been burning since 1962. That’s over 50 years! What? How is that even possible? So the issue is that Centralia, Pennsylvania is on top of some of the biggest coal deposits in the world. In the 1800s miners blasted tunnels underground and then abandoned them about 100 years later. No one really knows what exactly caused the fire but the strongest theory is that some burning trash from a landfill accidentally lit the coal near an old entrance to the mine. Yeah this isn’t fog, it’s smoke. Since sometimes coal deposits are under a lot of pressure, it can even ignite without a flame. The oxygen from the empty tunnels created the perfect conditions for the fire to spread. The flames started going deeper and deeper into the surrounding area as more coal burned, and the tunnels continue to take oxygen down from the surface. It is now in a vicious, fiery cycle that is now about 300 feet deep. Coal burns slow and steady and can take ages to burn out. As long as there is enough heat, fuel, and oxygen to keep it going, there’s nothing you can do. They actually tried to put it out by drilling holes into the mine and pouring wet sand down to block off the air supply but it didn’t work. It might not seem like such a big deal since the fire is underground but it really is. The 1000 residents probably didn’t think that is was a big deal either until sulfurous fumes and carbon monoxide almost suffocated everyone in their home. The underground fire fractured the ground making sink holes all over the place. A 12-year-old almost fell in one in 1981. The roads are also affected and have smoke coming out of them! The last time they tried to put it out was in the 1980’s but since then everyone’s just given up. Today about 12 people live in Centralia and it’s a very popular destination for graffiti artists. Check out this artwork all over the road. It also draws UFO seekers... The fire covers 6 square miles and spreads 75 feet every year. While this might seem like a freak accident, these kind of fires are actually pretty common. There are mine fires burning in Wyoming, Australia, Germany, and many other parts of the world. India and China have the most serious problems with hundreds of abandoned mines all over the country. Coal mine fires can burn for centuries and it is estimated that the Central fire could burn for another 250 years!
Views: 69854 Origins Explained
Coal Mine Disaster in China
 
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Another coal mining accident in China to tell you about. 17 miners are trapped in an underground mine in the city of Yuzhou in Henan Province. Here's more on the story. For more news and videos visit ☛ http://ntdtv.org Follow us on Twitter ☛ http://twitter.com/NTDTelevision Add us on Facebook ☛ http://on.fb.me/s5KV2C On Sunday sixty-two miners were working underground when their pit was flooded with water. 38 miners managed to escape by themselves and another seven were rescued. It is the latest in a string of accidents to plague China -- home to the world's deadliest coal-mining industry. As water was pumped out of the pit, gas fumes also began to rise... making rescue work more difficult and dangerous. A string of explosions at coal mines across the country, in recent days, have killed dozens of Chinese miners and left a number of them missing. China is the world's largest producer and consumer of coal. In 2007 alone, approximately 3,800 Chinese coal miners died in gas blasts, flooding, and other related accidents.
Views: 18563 NTDTV
24 workers killed in NE China coal fire
 
00:40
24 workers were killed, and 52 others injured in a coal mine fire in Northeast China’s Liaoning Province on Wednesday. Subscribe us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/user/CCTVNEWSbeijing Download for IOS: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/cctvnews-app/id922456579?l=zh&ls=1&mt=8 Download for Android: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.imib.cctv Follow us on: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/cctvnewschina Twitter: https://twitter.com/CCTVNEWS Google+: https://plus.google.com/+CCTVNEWSbeijing Tumblr: http://cctvnews.tumblr.com/ Weibo: http://weibo.com/cctvnewsbeijing
Views: 184 CGTN
President Trump's record on coal mining jobs
 
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Donald Trump promised to put coal miners back to work on the campaign trail. Although Trump claims he has done that, the numbers are a bit more complicated.
Views: 4822 CNNMoney
Burning Ghost Town In Centralia, Pennsylvania| Animals Amazing Wildlife
 
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Burning Ghost Town In Centralia, Pennsylvania| Animals Amazing Wildlife. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7ya69IWl-GLbhln6bt7B3gIf you thought the horror movie Silent Hill was fiction, you should visit Centralia, Pennsylvania. This abandoned ghost town has had a fire burning underground for over 50 years! Due to constant spontaneous combustion and oxidation, this mysterious old coal mine is completely out of control! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most SHOCKING Biological Weapons Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/W0Yli9y7YAk Watch our "Top 5 Most Mysterious and Powerful Secret Societies" video here: https://youtu.be/0Lu4Uvc5EhA Watch our "DEADLIEST Ship Disaster In History!" video here: https://youtu.be/8cNBVZMoalc Town literally burning for more than 50 years! There is a small town in Pennsylvania that has been burning since 1962. That’s over 50 years! What? How is that even possible? So the issue is that Centralia, Pennsylvania is on top of some of the biggest coal deposits in the world. In the 1800s miners blasted tunnels underground and then abandoned them about 100 years later. No one really knows what exactly caused the fire but the strongest theory is that some burning trash from a landfill accidentally lit the coal near an old entrance to the mine. Yeah this isn’t fog, it’s smoke. Since sometimes coal deposits are under a lot of pressure, it can even ignite without a flame. The oxygen from the empty tunnels created the perfect conditions for the fire to spread. The flames started going deeper and deeper into the surrounding area as more coal burned, and the tunnels continue to take oxygen down from the surface. It is now in a vicious, fiery cycle that is now about 300 feet deep. Coal burns slow and steady and can take ages to burn out. As long as there is enough heat, fuel, and oxygen to keep it going, there’s nothing you can do. They actually tried to put it out by drilling holes into the mine and pouring wet sand down to block off the air supply but it didn’t work. It might not seem like such a big deal since the fire is underground but it really is. The 1000 residents probably didn’t think that is was a big deal either until sulfurous fumes and carbon monoxide almost suffocated everyone in their home. The underground fire fractured the ground making sink holes all over the place. A 12-year-old almost fell in one in 1981. The roads are also affected and have smoke coming out of them! The last time they tried to put it out was in the 1980’s but since then everyone’s just given up. Today about 12 people live in Centralia and it’s a very popular destination for graffiti artists. Check out this artwork all over the road. It also draws UFO seekers... The fire covers 6 square miles and spreads 75 feet every year. While this might seem like a freak accident, these kind of fires are actually pretty common. There are mine fires burning in Wyoming, Australia, Germany, and many other parts of the world. India and China have the most serious problems with hundreds of abandoned mines all over the country. Coal mine fires can burn for centuries and it is estimated that the Central fire could burn for another 250 years!
Abandoned Glenburn Coal Mine Shamokin, Pa
 
42:12
9/30/17. Abandoned Remains of Glenburn Coal Mine. Shamokin, Pennsylvania. Like, comment, and Subscribe. JPVideos https://www.youtube.com/user/weightlifter81jp1
Mine Disasters: "Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners" 1998 MSHA 7min
 
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more at http://quickfound.net/ "Mine Safety and Health Administration Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners... This video describes the equipment and methods used to locate trapped miners in an underground mine environment." NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iy-m2n8Id2I Public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_accident A mining accident is an accident that occurs during the process of mining minerals. Thousands of miners die from mining accidents each year, especially in the processes of coal mining and hard rock mining. Most of the deaths nowadays occur in developing countries, especially China and rural parts of developed countries... Causes Mining accidents can have a variety of causes, including leaks of poisonous gases such as hydrogen sulfide[1] or explosive natural gases, especially firedamp or methane, dust explosions, collapsing of mine stopes, mining-induced seismicity, flooding, or general mechanical errors from improperly used or malfunctioning mining equipment (such as safety lamps or electrical equipment). Use of improper explosives underground can also cause methane and coal-dust explosions. Accidents by country Australia New South Wales's Mount Kembla Mine disaster of 31 July 1902 was an explosion resulting in the death of 96 miners, including two engaged in rescue work. An explosion at the Mount Mulligan mine on 19 September 1921 killed 75 workers. Only 11 bodies could be recovered... Canada The most well-known mining accidents in Canada have all occurred within the province of Nova Scotia. These include a series of disasters referred to collectively as the Springhill mining disasters, as well as the Westray Mine disaster in 1992. The Hillcrest mine disaster, the worst coal mining disaster of Canadian history, occurred in Alberta in 1914... China According to one source, in 2003 China accounted for the largest number of coal-mining fatalities, accounting for about 80% of the world's total, although it produced only 35% of the world's coal. Between January 2001 and October 2004, there were 188 accidents that had a death toll of more than 10, about one such accident every 7.4 days. After the 2005 Sunjiawan mine disaster, which killed at least 210 miners, a meeting of the State Council was convened to work on measures to improve work safety in coal mines. The meeting's statement indicated serious problems such as violation of safety standards and overproduction in some coal mines. Three billion yuan (360 million US dollars) were dedicated for technological renovation on work safety, gas management in particular, at state-owned major coal mines. The government also promised to send safety supervision teams to 45 coal mines with serious gas problems and invite colliery safety experts to evaluate safety situations in coal mines and formulate prevention measures... United States The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident of American history; 362 workers were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. From 1880 to 1910, mine accidents claimed thousands of fatalities. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year during the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 during the late 1950s, and to 93 during the 1990s. In addition to deaths, many thousands more are injured (an average of 21,351 injuries per year between 1991 and 1999), but overall there has been a downward trend of deaths and injuries. In 1959, the Knox Mine Disaster occurred in Port Griffith, Pennsylvania. The swelling Susquehanna river collapsed into a mine under it and resulted in 12 deaths. In Plymouth, Pennsylvania, the Avondale Mine Disaster resulted in the deaths of 108 miners and two rescue workers after a fire in the only shaft eliminated the oxygen in the mine. Federal laws for mining safety ensued this disaster. Pennsylvania suffered another disaster in 2002 at Quecreek, 9 miners were trapped underground and subsequently rescued after 78 hours. During 2006, 72 miners lost their lives at work, 47 by coal mining. The majority of these fatalities occurred in Kentucky and West Virginia, including the Sago Mine Disaster. On April 5, 2010, in the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster an underground explosion caused the deaths of 29 miners. The U.S. Bureau of Mines was created in 1910 to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set further safety standards for the industry...
Views: 7539 Jeff Quitney
Anthracite Coal Mining circa 1920
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent. Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 12776 Jeff Quitney
Hard Coal pt. 1 Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining Histor
 
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Part 1 of 3. A short documentary about Anthracite coal mining history in Northeast Pennsylvania. Filmed in a coal mine. Please check out Van Wagner's music on Itunes.
Views: 42430 vanwags
Coal miner dies in tragic accident
 
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In 1938 at the Pageton coal mine, a young coal miner died in a tragic mining accident. He was Johnny Valach's brother, Mike.
Views: 3389 William Kover
Three Mile Island Documentary
 
42:48
Views: 546002 AT
Anthracite Coal Mining: "Black Sunlight" circa 1920s Bray Studios
 
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more at http://scitech.quickfound.net/ "On anthracite coal mining--with animation showing how coal was created underground--Pan over valley in anthracite region of Pennsylvania -- strip mining deep mining--mining footage -- cars of crude coal to breaker removing waste from coal -- pile of tailing -- sizing of coal pieces loading on railroad cars -- pan over loaded railcars, trains rolling." Silent. NEW VERSION with improved video & sound: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xUTcnq0Lg90 Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A Originally a public domain film from the Prelinger Archive, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and mild video noise reduction applied. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 38924 Jeff Quitney
Pennsylvania's 50-Year-Old Coal Fire
 
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SciShow takes you to Centralia, Pennsylvania, site of one of the oldest, biggest coal fires in the United States, and explains the chemistry of spontaneous combustion. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S036012850300042X http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/energy/2013/01/pictures/130108-centralia-mine-fire/ http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/fire-in-the-hole-77895126/?no-ist http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/2010/0205/Centralia-Pa.-coal-fire-is-one-of-hundreds-that-burn-in-the-U.S http://www.businessinsider.com/photos-of-abandoned-centralia-pa-2012-5?op=1 http://discovermagazine.com/2010/jul-aug/28-earth-on-fre http://www.nytimes.com/2002/01/15/science/15FIRE.html http://blog.wsrb.com/2014/02/03/pennsylvania-is-burning-what-you-didnt-know-about-coal-seam-fires/ http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/UserFiles/works/pdfs/cmosh.pdf http://www.iea-coal.org.uk/documents/82476/7685/Propensity-of-coal-to-self-heat-(CCC/172)
Views: 550631 SciShow
A Hidden America: Coal Mining
 
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Section of 20/20 Documentary. I do not own the rights to this video.
Views: 37311 Damien Dickman
Five Dead, Seven Trapped after Coal Mine Cave-in in central China
 
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At least five people have been confirmed dead and seven others still trapped underground after a coal mine caved in late on Wednesday in Dengfeng City, central China's Henan Province. The cave-in caused by gas outburst occurred when 51 coal miners were working the shift at the Dengfeng-based Xingyu Coal Mining Co. Ltd.. The location of the trapped miners is now confirmed at about 1,500 meters away from the mine entrance. The blocked mine shafts are estimated to measure 34 meters. Among the five deaths, three were rescuers. The search and rescue operation is still ongoing. More on: http://www.cctvplus.com/news/20170105/8040166.shtml#!language=1 Subscribe us on Youtube: https://www.youtube.com/c/CCTVPlus CCTV+ official website: http://www.cctvplus.com/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/cctv-news-content Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/NewsContent.CCTVPLUS Twitter: https://twitter.com/CCTV_Plus
Views: 87 CCTV+
Mine Disasters: "Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners" 1998 MSHA Mine Safety & Health Admin
 
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Metals playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL64F10A579EB0A526 Geology & Earth Sciences playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://quickfound.net/ "Mine Safety and Health Administration Locating and Rescue of Trapped Miners... This video describes the equipment and methods used to locate trapped miners in an underground mine environment." Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the US National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining_accident A mining accident is an accident that occurs during the process of mining minerals. Thousands of miners die from mining accidents each year, especially in the processes of coal mining and hard rock mining... Causes Mining accidents can have a variety of causes, including leaks of poisonous gases such as hydrogen sulfide or explosive natural gases, especially firedamp or methane, dust explosions, collapsing of mine stopes, mining-induced seismicity, flooding, or general mechanical errors from improperly used or malfunctioning mining equipment (such as safety lamps or electrical equipment). Use of improper explosives underground can also cause methane and coal-dust explosions. Accidents by country Australia New South Wales's Mount Kembla Mine disaster of 31 July 1902 was an explosion resulting in the death of 96 miners... An explosion at the Mount Mulligan mine on 19 September 1921 killed 75 workers... Canada ...The Hillcrest mine disaster, the worst coal mining disaster of Canadian history, occurred in Alberta in 1914... China According to one source, in 2003 China accounted for the largest number of coal-mining fatalities, accounting for about 80% of the world's total, although it produced only 35% of the world's coal. Between January 2001 and October 2004, there were 188 accidents that had a death toll of more than 10, about one such accident every 7.4 days. After the 2005 Sunjiawan mine disaster, which killed at least 210 miners, a meeting of the State Council was convened to work on measures to improve work safety in coal mines. The meeting's statement indicated serious problems such as violation of safety standards and overproduction in some coal mines. Three billion yuan (360 million US dollars) were dedicated for technological renovation on work safety, gas management in particular, at state-owned major coal mines. The government also promised to send safety supervision teams to 45 coal mines with serious gas problems and invite colliery safety experts to evaluate safety situations in coal mines and formulate prevention measures... United States The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident of American history; 362 workers were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. From 1880 to 1910, mine accidents claimed thousands of fatalities. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year during the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 during the late 1950s, and to 93 during the 1990s. In addition to deaths, many thousands more are injured (an average of 21,351 injuries per year between 1991 and 1999), but overall there has been a downward trend of deaths and injuries. In 1959, the Knox Mine Disaster occurred in Port Griffith, Pennsylvania. The swelling Susquehanna river collapsed into a mine under it and resulted in 12 deaths. In Plymouth, Pennsylvania, the Avondale Mine Disaster resulted in the deaths of 108 miners and two rescue workers after a fire in the only shaft eliminated the oxygen in the mine. Federal laws for mining safety ensued this disaster. Pennsylvania suffered another disaster in 2002 at Quecreek, 9 miners were trapped underground and subsequently rescued after 78 hours. During 2006, 72 miners lost their lives at work, 47 by coal mining. The majority of these fatalities occurred in Kentucky and West Virginia, including the Sago Mine Disaster. On April 5, 2010, in the Upper Big Branch Mine disaster an underground explosion caused the deaths of 29 miners. The U.S. Bureau of Mines was created in 1910 to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set further safety standards for the industry...
Views: 708 Jeff Quitney
Struggling US coal industry sees Trump as saviour
 
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Subscribe to France 24 now : http://f24.my/youtubeEN FRANCE 24 live news stream: all the latest news 24/7 http://f24.my/YTliveEN In the United States, coal workers are fervently hoping that presidential candidate Donald Trump will save their vanishing industry. His rival Hillary Clinton believes in shifting to clean, renewable energy, which does not go down well in coal country. Our correspondent reports from southern Illinois, where Trump is popular with voters. A programme prepared by Patrick Lovett and Elom Marcel Toble.   Visit our website : http://www.france24.com Subscribe to our YouTube channel : http://f24.my/youtubeEN Like us on Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/FRANCE24.English Follow us on Twitter : https://twitter.com/France24_en
Views: 8162 FRANCE 24 English
Exploring an Abandoned Coal Mine - Part 1
 
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Today we're exploring an old, abandoned coal mine that was active in the 1800s. The mine blew away our expectations with its depth and size. Enjoy the exploration with us.
Views: 22322 Guerrilla Gentlemen
China Coal Mine Fire In Northeast  Kills 21
 
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A fire at a coal mine in China's northeastern province of Heilongjiang killed 21 people with one still missing, state media reported on Saturday. Subscribe to Times Of India's Youtube channel here: http://goo.gl/WgIatu Also Subscribe to Bombay Times Youtube Channel here: http://goo.gl/AdXcgU Social Media Links: Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/TimesofIndia Twitter : https://twitter.com/timesofindia Google + : https://plus.google.com/u/0/+timesindia/posts 'Download TOI app on Android & iPhone and WIN free recharge coupon worth Rs. 50/- from Paytm - http://goo.gl/AvRYmM Times Of India's Official YouTube channel is managed by Culture Machine Media Pvt Ltd.
Views: 207 The Times of India
America's Dirty Secret: Coal Ash
 
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Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus (Earth Focus: Episode 64) People in three adjacent Pennsylvania communities suffer from a rare blood cancer. In Juliette, Georgia, where radioactive water flows from the tap, people are also getting sick. What else do these communities have in common? Coal ash. Some 130 million tons of it is generated in the US each year. It contains toxins like lead, arsenic and mercury and it gets into ground water from unlined pond and pit storage sites. The federal government says it's non-hazardous and regulation is left to state governments where the coal industry has great influence. And it's always people who suffer the consequences. Read Earth Focus correspondent Miles Benson's blog post, "Coal Ash: Both Beneficial and Poisonous?": https://www.linktv.org/earth-focus-blog/episode-64
Views: 17384 Link TV
Hard Coal pt. 3 Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining Histor
 
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Part 3 of 3. A short documentary about Anthracite coal mining history in Northeast Pennsylvania. Filmed in a coal mine.
Views: 17454 vanwags
Historic Footage of Pennsylvania Colliery, ca. 1930-1940
 
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Silent black & white archival film clip from Benjamin Harrison Hay's Footage of a Pennsylvania Colliery, ca. 1930-1940. Hay's footage shows the mining village of Buck Run, located about 45 miles west of Allentown, PA built for operators, managers and employees of the Buck Run Coal Company which was in operation from 1902 until 1950. The original mine owner James B. Neale was socially progressive and wanted to create a real community for the benefit of his workers. By 1925 the town boasted a school, an infirmary, a community recreation facility, a company store and several churches, in addition to homes with running water, electricity and steam heat. Benjamin Harrison Hay was Neale's general manager, vice president and brother in law who assumed control of the company upon Neale's death in 1943. Buck Run Coal was bought out was bought out by Reading Anthracite Company in 1950 and the social experiment came to an end. Very little of the original company town remains today. This clip shows a steam shovel loading processed coal onto a rail car and workers entering and returning from the mine. For more details, see the full catalog record: http://collections.si.edu/search/results.jsp?q=hsfa+colliery&image.x=0&image.y=0
Views: 15958 HSFAFilmClips
Orchard Coal Mine
 
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A visit to Orchard Coal Mine in Goodspring, PA in April of 2008. This a typical small coal mine which is part of the Independent Miners Association in the anthracite region. This is part of my ongoing essay on the miners way of life. Copyright 2008 For a look at my photo essay: http://www.f-stop16.com/abe and http://www.flickr.com/photos/nikonman24/sets/ Email: [email protected]
Views: 12991 snapolson
Lackawanna Coal Mine tour
 
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A visit to the Lackawanna Coal Mine tour at McDade Park in Scranton, PA on May 17th, 2008. The tour was the first of three mine tours taken that day through the Underground Miners and Chris Murley. Thanks to Chris and his cohort Banks Ries!! All footage, Copyright 2008. Email: [email protected]
Views: 66036 snapolson
Coal Miners Slideshow 29 pix
 
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Coal mining in Pennsylvania and Virginia early in the 20th Century.
Views: 6389 Jude Gardner
Jobs in Coal Mining
 
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http://clearcutmining.com/careers.aspx This is a video of Longwall mining and shows some of the possible jobs in the coal mining industry in Queensland, Australia.
Views: 67459 Aram Drake
R&R Coal Mine
 
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A visit to R&R Coal Mine in Goodspring, PA in 2005. This is my favorite mine of all I've seen. It has the most homemade feel by far. It's a shame that it's closed now. Thanks to owner Gary Lucas, his son Joe, and helper Chuck Cress. Check out stills here: www.f-stop16.com/abe and www.flickr.com/photos/nikonman24/sets/ Enjoy and please pass the links along to anyone who might enjoy seeing more of the anthracite mining heritage from northeast PA. Thanks for your interest! Footage: Copyright 2008 Email: [email protected]
Views: 13830 snapolson
Minefield for China coal workers - 26-Dec-07
 
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Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Coal fuel's China's booming economy, but the country's coal mining industry has the worst safety record in the world. Al Jazeera's Tony Birtley reports from Sunjiawan, where local people have paid a high price to keep China's coal power stations burning. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 4890 Al Jazeera English
Digging for Hope: Inside an Ohio coal mine
 
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Matt Beaver and other miners describe their difficult working conditions and how they hope President Donald Trump can save their struggling industry. They work at the Vail Mine, owned by the Redbud Mining Company, in Freeport, Ohio.
Views: 406208 TheColumbusDispatch
Exploring the Centralia Mine Fire Ghost Town - PA
 
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More videos on TUC Extras Channel: http://youtube.com/theunknowncamextras https://www.facebook.com/TheUnknownCameraman/ http://www.twitter.com/TheUnknownCam More info and history on Centralia at --- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centralia,_Pennsylvania
Views: 317218 TheUnknownCameraman
Hazleton PA Coal Mine
 
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Tour of the works of a soon to be demolished coal mine in Hazleton PA conducted by mining engineer and member of the Society for Industrial Archeology, Jim Kovach
Views: 16369 Thomas Byro
Seldom Seen Coal Mine in Patton PA
 
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The Seldom Seen Mine is unique in that it represents, on a small scale, a relatively intact and complete site. The mine and site are small enough for the visitor to easily comprehend the entire process of mining and shipping coal. The site also possesses an excellent array of resources including original structures, a variety of equipment, and an underground tour.
Views: 478 Human Diaries
The Coal Mine on the Farm
 
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The Coal Mine on the Farm Coal mining was a significant industry in Ohura in the 1960s. This particular coal mine is located in the Mackenzie Family Farm at Ohura Video from TVNZ 20th October 1968.
Views: 3680 james gribble
Who Killed The Coal Industry in America? 2017 Edition
 
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The coal industry in the US is almost dead, but it wasn’t renewables that killed it. Get new updates straight to your inbox here https://teslanomics.co/join "The biggest contributor to coal and nuclear plant retirements has been the advantaged economics of natural gas-fired generation,” says a recent report by the Department of Energy. It also found that the rise of renewable energy, such as wind and solar, hasn’t yet created any problems for reliability and resilience of the electricity grid. The report also recommends that the department shouldn’t intervene in energy markets, such as using funds to support coal. Between 2012 and 2017, the US shut approximately 50 gigawatts (GW) of coal-fired generation capacity. If planned retirements are taken into consideration, the future for coal looks even bleaker. When President Obama was in office he created the Clean Power Plan which was aimed at lowering the CO2 emissions from the US by capturing some of the carbon emitted and increasing the mix of renewable forms of energy like Wind and Solar. In March of 2017, the Trump administration repealed this hoping it would, as he said “save the coal industry” however the report from the DOE suggests otherwise.  Their report predicts into the future we’ll see more and more natural gas and less coal and nuclear. One of the main reasons is because of how much more efficient Natural Gas is compared to Coal and Nuclear. While Coal and Nuclear are similar regarding the heat generated during the process of creating electricity, the heat generated using Natural Gas has continued to decline, giving it a greater overall efficiency. The nail in the coffin for the solar industry could be renewables which combined with Natural Gas, will deliver the final blow the coal industry, laying it to rest once and for all. #hallelujah A big reason for this is because of the cost of renewables. Some forecasts suggest that the levelized average cost of electricity (LCOE) per kWh will drop significantly by 2025 making Solar from PhotoVoltaic panels and onshore wind the cheapest in the world. And we’re already seeing a huge spike in Solar investments here in the US in recent years, now accepting for almost 10% of the overall grid. So I want to say thank you to Rick Perry, for ordering this study and helping us move closer towards a brighter future where not only is our energy better for the environment, but cheaper and more sustainable as well. In fact, he will probably come around once he realizes how many more jobs the renewable energy industry is creating. His own department put out a report in showing that the Solar industry alone employed more than double the number of coal employees across the US. Like any high-level figures though, this metric didn't tell the true story as there was a job disparity across the states. Coal was by far the bigger employer in some areas still. But the point here is that there is indeed a big market for energy workers in the US and just because the Coal industry is vanishing, it doesn’t mean the jobs will vanish as well, they’ll likely just change slightly.  // Sources https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/04/25/climate/todays-energy-jobs-are-in-solar-not-coal.html https://qz.com/1061246/a-new-department-of-energy-report-explains-why-coal-is-dying-in-the-us/ // New here? Check out more Most Recent Video - https://goo.gl/k3pWlt Most Popular Video - https://goo.gl/jydACR Subscribe - https://goo.gl/tPDO7v // Want to Support the Show? Join us on Patreon! https://teslanomics.co/patreon // Shoot me a msg online fb https://fb.com/teslanomics tw https://twitter.com/teslanomicsco // My Gear Books https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/books-i-ve-actually-read Tech https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/tech-gear Camera - https://kit.com/teslanomicsco/camera-gear Aitech by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100336 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ That Day by Joakim Karud https://soundcloud.com/joakimkarud Creative Commons — Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported— CC BY-SA 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/YDT00lBAG2g
26 killed in coal mine fire in northeast China
 
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The death toll from a coal mine fire in the city of Fuxin in in northeast China’s Liaoning Province early Wednesday has risen to 26, while 50 injured victims have undergone treatment in two local hospitals. CCTV’s Guan Yang reported this story from Fuxin, in northeast China’s Liaoning province.
Views: 80 CGTN America
Coal Mining in China
 
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China coal mine are dangerous and cause respiratory disease
Views: 289 Andrew Friedrich
My neighborhood. Inside an abandoned coal mine!
 
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I go inside a coal mine that's been abandoned for 50 years and then we travel 2 miles to a flooded ventilation shaft! Both in my neighborhood. Many years ago 4 men lost their lives in the mine due to a fire. Two of them were brothers. May they all rest in peace.
WV  under ground coal mining
 
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Ride into mine Alloy,WV (Mammoth coal) (Powellton seam)
Views: 58484 MrLeeroy81
Burning coal mine in China
 
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This is an open-cast coal mine and the coal is burning. This was filmed in heavy rain. The coal is being mined, in part, to put out the fire and reduce pollution.
Views: 2949 darwinsboy
Tennessee Coal Mining
 
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A rare look into a coal mine in Caryville, Tennessee
Views: 54588 Jeff Hentschel
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Mine Collapse Traps Two Miners
 
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A rescue operation was underway after a ceiling collapsed at the Tracy Lynne mine in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania just before 5 P.M. EDT today. Authorities say that the collapse had injured two miners and that they were trapped. Two helicopters were sent to the area, most likely medical helicopters to pick up the victims after they were freed. Back in 2005, a ceiling collapse at the same mine killed one miner. http://pittsburgh.cbslocal.com/2013/06/24/2-injured-after-armstrong-co-mine-collapses/
Views: 64 TomStick91
India: Coughing up Coal
 
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Find more Earth Focus content at https://www.linktv.org/earthfocus India is rivaling China -- in its plans to consume coal. India is aggressively expanding construction of coal fired power plants to meet growing energy needs. Some 455 new plants now are in the pipeline. With air pollution already a leading health concern, medical experts say this expansion can have dire health consequences. Emissions from coal power plants were linked to 80,000-150,000 premature deaths in India between 2011 and 2012 alone and to a wide range of diseases from cancers, to respiratory and cardiovascular disorders. Singrauli -- an industrial hub in north central India -- embodies the tragic human toll that a largely unregulated coal industry can extract. Sarah Stirk of the Ecologist Film Unit files this original investigative report for Earth Focus. Read a blog post from Sarah Stirk, journalist and filmmaker for the Ecologist Film Unit in the United Kingdom: https://www.linktv.org/earth-focus-blog/india-s-coal-pollution
Views: 5294 Link TV
Coal Story, The Mine
 
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Vintage story about coal mining in Appalachia
Views: 77374 tvnewsbadge