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Coal mining in America's heartland | DW Documentary
 
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West Virginia, USA - under its wild mountain idyll hides the "black hell": A labyrinth of dark tunnels - hard life in a coal mine. [Online until: 15 August 2019] "Wild, wonderful West Virginia” - that’s how the small state nestled in the Appalachian Mountains bills itself. This documentary reports on the daily struggle facing local coal miners hoping for help from Donald Trump; a sheriff combating the opioid epidemic that has already claimed thousands of lives; and a Cherokee environmental activist whose efforts have earned her intimidation and threats. The whistle of a locomotive at the front of an old coal train, quiet winding roads, and hardly a highway to be found - that’s still the image that many have of West Virginia today. But beneath the forest-covered mountains lies a labyrinth of tunnels just one meter high, in which miners still spend their entire working days toiling in the dark on their hands and knees. The camera team accompanies a traditional coal mining family as they go about their day. Together with the family’s two sons, Scott and Steven Lockhart, the crew ventures into the mine. Conversations with the miners reveal why people who had been lifelong Democratic Party supporters are suddenly placing their hopes for the future in Donald Trump. But the documentary also ventures beyond the coal mines to uncover the lesser-known sides of this Appalachian state - from snake-handling Pentecostal churches to the bluegrass and mountain ballads of Alan Cathead Johnston. We also speak with Sheriff Martin West, who sued the country’s three biggest pharmaceutical makers for their role in the opioid epidemic that has swept the region. And we meet another person who has decided to fight back: Maria Gunnoe, a young Cherokee activist who has dared to take on the coal barons that are ravaging the beautiful mountains of West Virginia. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954
Views: 360008 DW Documentary
Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History
 
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Coal Mining Documentary - The Most Dangerous Job On Earth - Classic History Coal mining is the process of extracting coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa a coal mine and its structures are a colliery, a coal mine a pit, and the above-ground structures the pit head. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has been used to describe a coal mine operation but nowadays the word is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunnelling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, hydraulic jacks and shearers. Small-scale mining of surface deposits dates back thousands of years. For example, in Roman Britain, the Romans were exploiting most of the major coalfields by the late 2nd century AD. Read More: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 7606 Classic History
A History of Coal's Extraordinary Impact on Human Civilization (2003)
 
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The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has historically been used to describe a coal mine operation, but the word today is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers The American share of world coal production remained steady at about 20 percent from 1980 to 2005, at about 1 billion short tons per year. The United States was ranked as the 2nd coal producing country in the world in 2010, and possesses the largest coal reserves in the world. In 2008 then-President George W. Bush stated that coal was the most reliable source of electricity.[61] However, in 2011 President Barack Obama said that the US should rely more on "clean" sources of energy that emit lower or no carbon dioxide pollution.[62] As of 2013, while domestic coal consumption for electric power was being displaced by natural gas, exports were increasing. US coal production increasingly comes from strip mines in the western United States, such as from the Powder River Basin in Wyoming and Montana.[63] Coal has come under continued price pressure from natural gas and renewable energy sources, which has resulted in a rapid decline of coal in the U.S. and several notable bankruptcies including Peabody Energy. On April 13, 2016 it reported, its revenue tumbled 17 percent as coal price fell and lost 2 billion dollars on the previous year.[64] It then filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy on April 13, 2016.[64] The Harvard Business Review discussed retraining coal workers for solar photovoltaic employment because of the rapid rise in U.S. solar jobs.[65] A recent study indicated that this was technically possible and would account for only 5% of the industrial revenue from a single year to provide coal workers with job security in the energy industry as whole. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining
Views: 847 Way Back
World's biggest mine: Inside US coal
 
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Barack Obama’s pledge to cut carbon emissions has not stopped North Antelope Rochelle mine in Wyoming. In fact, production is booming - and climate change is off the agenda. The Guardian's Suzanne Goldenberg gets a rare look inside the biggest coal mine in the world. Subscribe to The Guardian ► http://bit.ly/subscribegdn Get the whole picture ► http://bit.ly/guardianhome ENDBOARD VIDEOS The godless church and the atheists taking the US by storm ► http://bit.ly/GodlessChurch US Democracy doesn't work in this slice of Florida ► http://bit.ly/1EuRyMz GUARDIAN PLAYLISTS Guardian Investigations ► http://bit.ly/gdninvestigations Comment is Free ► http://bit.ly/CIFplaylist Guardian Docs ► http://bit.ly/gdndocs Guardian Animations & Explanations ► http://bit.ly/aninandex Other Guardian channels on YouTube: Guardian Football ► https://www.youtube.com/user/guardianfootball Guardian Music ► https://www.youtube.com/guardianmusic Guardian Membership ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianMembership Guardian Food ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianFood Guardian Culture ► https://www.youtube.com/user/GuardianCultureArts Guardian Tech ► THE GUARDIAN'S TOP 10 VIDEOS Mos Def force fed in Gitmo procedure ► http://bit.ly/1hdvoqM Bangladeshi Sex Workers take steroids ► http://bit.ly/1mqf3fA North Korean military parade in slow-mo ► http://bit.ly/TTEAGk Police assault on Ian Tomlinson at G20 ► http://bit.ly/1rgq6Pg Manny Pacquiao fight highlights ► http://bit.ly/RBczBp Brick-by-brick women's fencing protest ► http://bit.ly/RBcEFc Trouserless on the Tube ► http://bit.ly/SPWOrv Jesus "would have been an atheist" ► http://bit.ly/1kfrKqP Open Heart Surgery ► http://bit.ly/1tPaGQ2 Brick-by-Brick Usain Bolt 2012 Olympic gold ► http://bit.ly/1pxQqQv
Views: 202254 The Guardian
Harlan County, USA
 
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Harlan County, USA is a 1976 Oscar-winning documentary film covering the "Brookside Strike", an effort of 180 coal miners and their wives against the Duke Power Company-owned Eastover Coal Company's Brookside Mine and Prep Plant in Harlan County, southeast Kentucky in 1973.[2] Directed and produced by Barbara Kopple, who has long been an advocate of workers' rights, Harlan County, U.S.A. is less ambivalent in its attitude toward unions than her later American Dream, the account of the Hormel Foods strike in Austin, Minnesota in 1985-86. Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - documentaries
Views: 58607 Karl Hungus
EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
 
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EARLY DAYS - COAL MINE
Views: 6202 frank arrowsmith
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
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In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 78829 National Geographic
Coal Mining: The Disasters and the History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation
 
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A public domain video A film about the history of underground coal mining throughout the years. The disasters and the health regulations. -The Monongah Mining Disaster was the worst mining accident in American history; 362 men and young boys were killed in an underground explosion on December 6, 1907 in Monongah, West Virginia. -Following a decade in which the number of coal mining fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau Of Mines in 1910 as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was to investigate accidents, advise industry, conduct production and safety research, and teach courses in accident prevention, first aid, and mine rescue. However, Congress did not empower the federal inspectors to enter and inspect mines until 1941, and did not authorize a code of federal regulations for mine safety until 1947. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Acts of 1969 and 1977 set greater safety standards for the industry. Where annual mining deaths had numbered more than 1,000 a year in the early part of the 20th century, they decreased to an average of about 500 in the late 1950s. Subscribe - never miss a video! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_S8ZlDCRkMMgc7ciw8X-hg The 20th Century Time Machine takes you back in time to the most important historical events of the past century. Watch documentaries, discussions and real footage of major events that shaped the world we live in today. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHAZA5h5cmo
Views: 2456 npatou
The Coal Town System
 
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West Virginia coal operators built small, company-owned towns for their miners to live in. The coal towns were almost always unincorporated; there were no elected officials, no independent police forces. Owners hired private detective agencies to watch over their workforce. Company towns were also untethered from the free market competition owners usually championed. "The Mine Wars" premieres January 26, 2016 on American Experience PBS.
Views: 13795 AmericanExperiencePBS
The Unheard Story Of Appalachia's Coal, Part 1
 
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Eastern Kentucky and most of Appalachia had a thriving coal industry for more than 100 years. We went to coal country to talk to people about just how important coal has been to the region and how much Appalachia has changed with its decline. Part 2: https://youtu.be/UJxCqHoUAT8 Part 3: https://youtu.be/hYEEBpHJMAQ Additional archival photos provided by the SKCTC Appalachian Archives, from their U.S. Coal & Coke, International Harvester, Ewell Balltrip and Kentucky Coal Museum Photo Collections. Subscribe for more videos: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCV3Nm3T-XAgVhKH9jT0ViRg?sub_confirmation=1 Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ajplusenglish Download the AJ+ app at http://www.ajplus.net/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajplus
Views: 68366 AJ+
American Coal Mining Documentary - Strip Mines - Appalachian Mountains - 1974
 
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FOR OVER 25 YEARS COAL COMPANIES HAVE STRIP MINED THOUSAND OF ACRES OF AMERICAN APPALCHIAN MOUNTAINS. THOUSAND OF ACRES OF COUNTRY ARE LAID WASTE AS WHOLE MOUNTAINSIDE ARE BLASTED AND BULLDOZED TO REACH OFTEN TINY COAL SEAMS. ONE OF THE BIGGEST LAND OWNERS IN THE AREA IS THE BRITISH COMPANY "AMERICAN ASSOCIATION LTD" WHICH FORMS PART OF AN INTERNATIONAL EMPIRE HEADED BY AN EX LORD MAYOR OF LONDON, SIR DENYS LOWSON. First Shown: 25/07/1974 If you would like to license a clip from this video please e mail: [email protected] Quote: VT9724
Views: 18629 ThamesTv
Centralia Burning Ghost Town - Pennsylvania USA
 
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Centralia, Pennsylvania was nearly entirely evacuated following a coal mine fire, burning beneath the town since 1962. Centralia’s fire started in 1962, when residents turned an old strip mine into a dump, and setting the rubbish alight. The fire spread through an unsealed opening to the underground coal mines, igniting a seam of coal, and the fire has been burning to this day. In 1992, Pennsylvania condemned the town and claimed it under eminent domain in an attempt for force the remaining residents out. Some sued, and were allowed to stay. A section of State Route 61 was abandoned after it began to buckle and crumble from the underground fire. The fire stretches 12km, and burns underneath an area of 15 square kilometres, 300 feet below ground, authorities say the fire could burn for another 250 years. The town now mostly attracts tourists who visit an abandoned highway, where many profanities and obscene pictures are spray painted onto it, over time the highway has earned the nickname Graffiti Highway. Centralia is rumored to have inspired Silent Hill. Thanks for watching ____________________________________________________________________ CREDIT LINKS ► Joey Underground Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/user/kurtishamilton1986 ► Abandoned Town of Centralia - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5TNYN3rEBws ► ABANDONED_PA Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw8JkFvrKJY ► ABANDONED_PA Video - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xw8JkFvrKJY ____________________________________________________________________ ► Wonder World Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/wonderworld.ytc.10 ► Wonder World Twitter - https://twitter.com/WonderWorld_YTC For business enquiries, content submission or copyright concerns or disputes, please contact us at [email protected]
Views: 2215193 Wonder World
COAL: The documentary
 
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The Northwest is square in the middle of a controversial global debate: Should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? As the U.S. economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? COAL is a KCTS 9 and EarthFix original documentary. For more information on the documentary, visit: kcts9.org/coal or earthfix.us/coaldoc. For ongoing reporting on Coal in the Northwest, visit EarthFix: earthfix.info/coal/ Credits Written, Directed and Produced by Katie Campbell Photography by Michael Werner Katie Campbell Editor Michael Werner Narrator Katie Campbell EarthFix reporters Ashley Ahearn Bonnie Stewart Amelia Templeton Courtney Flatt Cassandra Profita Aaron Kunz Aerial photography by Katie Campbell Aerial support provided by Christopher Boyer, LightHawk Hunter Handsfield, LightHawk Additional photography Aaron Kunz Stock Footage - RevoStock Audio post production Milt Ritter Post Production Support Lisa Strube-Kilgore Phil Williams Chris Maske Music Lonely Rails Written by Seth Warren and C. Andrew Rohrmann. Performed by Seth Warren. Published by Sciencelab. Salt Flats Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Like a Phoenix Written by Steve Carter. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Celtic Mist Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Pistola Written by Geoff Levin. Published by ZFC Music. Fluttering Leaves Written by Daniel Pemberton. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Couple Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by BBC Production Music. Halcyon Skies Written by Ben Hales and Matt Hales. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Loner Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Special Thanks to Dustin Bleizeffer Shannon Anderson LightHawk Keith Williams Thunder Basin Coal Company Leroy Rohde Andy Rohrmann Tom Lubnau Columbia River Pilots Aaron Toso Courtney Wallace Lauri Hennessey
Views: 165775 EarthFixMedia
South Africa World's Deepest Gold Mine Construction - Full Documentary
 
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Mponeng is a gold mine in South Africa's Gauteng province. It extends over 4 kilometres below the surface, and is considered to be one of the most substantial gold mines in the world. It is also currently the world's deepest mine. The trip from the surface to the bottom of the mine takes over an hour. Video link: https://youtu.be/6ZtYInuOKtE Thanks for watching
Views: 249850 Engineering TV
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 163010 Nick Mullins
Racial and Ethnic Boundaries in the Coal Mines
 
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To meet the growing demand for coal in the early 20th century, West Virginia companies needed more miners. African Americans mixed with European immigrants and native Appalachians in the mines and the coal towns. Coal operators felt that diversity would keep unionization at bay. "The Mine Wars" premieres on American Experience PBS January 26, 2015.
Views: 4102 AmericanExperiencePBS
The Mine Wars | PBS America
 
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Premieres 9pm, Wednesday 29 June on Freesat 156 | Sky 534 | Virgin Media 276 Following its European premiere at the Sheffield Doc Fest, this documentary recalls the struggle for trade union recognition by mine workers in West Virginia, a battle that lasted two decades. At the beginning of the 20th century, coal was the engine of American industrial progress. The coal industry employed over 700,000 men, yet few Americans gave much thought to the price paid by those whose working days were spent underground. With entire communities owned by the mining companies, conditions and pay were strictly controlled. The stage was set for conflict, and the spark that ignited the flame arrived in 1901 in the shape of Mary Harris "Mother" Jones, an outspoken labour organiser and activist. West Virginian miners went on strike in 1902, with the employees demanding shorter workdays, higher wages and recognition of the union. It was to be the first of a series of industrial disputes that frequently erupted into violence, with successive state governors being forced to declare martial law as the coal companies engaged paramilitary forces to combat the strikers, who themselves were heavily armed. Superior force was eventually to prevail, however, and in the early 1920s the strikes eventually petered out. It would not be until 1933 that Congress passed legislation guaranteeing the workers' right to unionise.
Views: 4008 PBS America
The trade union history of coal in the USA
 
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Coal mining in the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountaintop_removal_mining
Views: 133 visionontv
AMERICA REVEALED | Where Does Our Coal Come From? | PBS
 
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See the full episode at http://video.pbs.org/video/2226356267/ Did you know coal supplies nearly half of America's electricity? Visit Black Thunder Mine with Yul Kwon and discover how we mine this pivotal material. See more in the four-part AMERICA REVEALED, Wednesdays, April 11- May 2 at 10/9c on PBS.
Views: 91437 PBS
5 Worst Jobs Given To Children In History
 
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Throughout history children have often been utilised as nothing more than cheap and convenient labour, forced to undertake a whole host of unbelievable and downright dangerous jobs. In an age before legislation which protects the rights of workers, and enforces a minimum working age, young children were often at the mercy of ruthless adults, keen to exploit them for personal profit. So next time you think you are having a bad day at work, spare a thought for these unfortunate souls… 5. Mudlarks 4. Mule Scavengers 3. Coal Miners 2. Chimney Sweeps 1. Powder Monkeys Read articles on my website: http://www.Unknown5.com/ Say hi on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Unknown5-1536133216686538 Tweet me at Twitter: https://twitter.com/Unknown5TV Music by CO.AG: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCcavSftXHgxLBWwLDm_bNvA Track used: "The Lost" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vpowIDAOMhc
Views: 842561 Unknown5
Springhill Mining Disaster
 
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Support BDHQ http://www.patreon.com/baddayhq The 1958 bump, which occurred on October 23, 1958, was the most severe "bump" (underground earthquake) in North American mining history. The 1958 bump devastated the people of Springhill for the casualties they suffered; it also devastated the town, as the coal industry had been its economic lifeblood. After five and a half days (therefore around the morning of Wednesday, October 29, 1958), contact was established with a group of 12 survivors on the other side of a 160-foot (49 m) rockfall. A rescue tunnel was dug; it broke through to the trapped miners at 2:25 am on Thursday, October 30, 1958. Having a bad day? I bet we have worse ones for you. Sound off in the comments on your thoughts and what you'd like to see next! SUBSCRIBE today to get the latest true crime and disaster documentaries delivered to you weekly! All content is copyright of Partners in Motion INC. Join us on social media: https://www.facebook.com/partnersinmotion/?view_public_for=1003857803032519 https://twitter.com/PartnersHarmony https://plus.google.com/u/0/109232389902601257458 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Want to survive a real disaster or enhance a camping trip? Support Bad Day HQ by ordering some of our personally selected products: Best selling SAS Survival guide: https://goo.gl/IUms75 72-Hour emergency survival kit: https://goo.gl/FLkEOh LifeStraw portable water filter: https://goo.gl/hzBOz0 BioLite dual wood burning stove and USB charger: https://goo.gl/X8mDXK
Views: 48461 Bad Day HQ
Out In The Coal Patch: Life in the Coal Mining Towns of Western Pennsylvania
 
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Lecture by Gary Rogers Oakmont Historical Society Lecture Series Oakmont Carnegie Library 11/27/2017 Just as coal provided energy for the steel industry, coal provided a way life for coal miners. In this Oakmont Historical Society lecture, we take a look up the Allegheny River and into the lives of the miners and community life out in the coal patch. For more information contact us at www.oakmonthistoricalsociety.org or join us on Facebook. * for future notice of upcoming videos, please subscribe to our channel. Thanks for watching.
Stock Footage - Coal Mining in Early America
 
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Archive Footage - Black & White - The Coal Mining industry of America. For this and more Footage visit: http://www.myfootage.com/details.php?gid=58&sgid=&pid=16206#tn This clip is available for licensing from MyFootage.com - Call us at (212) 620-3955 - Please Subscribe to our channel, as we are constantly adding new clips. Thanks!
Views: 4104 MyFootage.com
11 Most Massive Mines in the World
 
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From the worlds largest gold mine found on the top of a mountain to the largest diamond mine in the world here are the most massive mines in the world! Subscribe to American EYE! 5.. Asbestos Mine, Canada Also known as the Jeffrey Mine, it’s located in Asbestos, Quebec and it was in operation until 2012. It’s a whopping 2 kilometers wide and 370 meters deep! Check out this thing on google maps and you can tell how completely massive this thing is! It’s the by far the largest asbestos mine in the world. For a long period of time, people would use this mineral to put into their walls and keep their homes from catching on fire! But recently there’s been a link with asbestos and a disease called mesothelioma, which is a lung condition. This is a toxic substance that people should avoid, so obviously this large mine went out of business. The lake at the bottom might look like an inviting blue, but you can bet your bottom dollar, it’s highly toxic! The small town that grew with the thriving asbestos industry feels like they’ve kind of lost their identity once the mine was forced to close, but people do still live there. 4. Mcarthur River Uranium Mine In case you were wondering which mine produces the most uranium in the world, that would be of course the Mcarthur River uranium mine in Saskatchewan Canada. This huge deposit was found in 1988 and finally a mining operation took place in 1997, when it began producing what’s known as Yellowcake. It’s not the kind of yellow cake you’d eat with your grandparents. This stuff has a horrific odor and basically what it is, is concentrated uranium powder which can then be used for powering nuclear reactors. We imagine this powdery substance is quite difficult to get ahold of. There aren’t a ton of photos of this place but, it does produce about 13 percent of the global uranium production across the globe. 3. Diavik Diamond Mine In case you thought it was Africa who had all the massive diamond mines, think again! The Diavik Diamond mine, found in the the northwest territories of Canada is one of the largest producers of diamonds in the Northern hemisphere and this place is pretty crazy! They annually produce 7 million carats of diamonds each year and you better believe it’s not easy to get here. The Diavik mine is found north of the arctic circle and it’s definitely cold! This photo here shows the subarctic landscapes that surround the diamond mine. You thought getting to work in the morning was tough for you? Imagine trying to get to work here! Just recently in 2015, this diamond produced what was known as the Diavik Foxfire 187.7 which is one of the largest rough gem quality diamonds ever produced. 2. Siberian Diamond Mine Also known as the Mirny Mine, The USSR began searching for ways to make to make themselves a more economical stable and independent union. In 1955 the Soviets discovered large diamond deposits at this site in the far away lands of Siberia and many people got to work very quickly in order to help bring wealth to the union. After about 20 years of operations, they finally decided that At one point this mine produced 10 million carats of diamonds a year and reaches a max depth of 524 meters or around 1700 feet making it the 2nd largest excavated hole in the world. The mine is so deep, airspace is closed over the hole due to helicopter crashes caused from the downward flow of air. The construction of this in the frigid conditions of Siberia must have been grueling and downright cruel. Sources state that the machinery used at this mine had to be covered at night or it would freeze Are the diamonds worth freezing to death?! It’s unoperational today but Some claim that there’s still a bunch of diamonds in this mine and the whole thing could be worth about 12 Billion dollars. It’s possible that controlling this diamond is mine is crucial to controlling the price of diamonds across the world. Bingham Copper Mine The bingham copper mine located near Salt Lake City Utah is home to the biggest pit in the world and it’s been in operation since 1903. It’s about 2.5 miles wide and if it were a stadium, it would be able to fit an estimated 9.5 million people. It keeps getting bigger and bigger too! Diligent workers can move about 250,000 tons of rock each day and it’s even become a tourist attraction in recent years before a massive landslide took place. Some claim that this was the biggest non volcanic landslide to take place in North American modern history. This photo we see here shows you the aftermath of this massive landslide and Bingham Copper mine and it makes you wonder how safe some of the conditions at these mines truly are. The landslides were so massive, that they actually triggered a few small earthquakes! Experts estimated that 165 tons of earth slide down from the top of the mine all the way to the bottom.
Views: 260345 American Eye
Situation Critical - S01E12 - Coal Mine Disaster
 
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At the Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, coal miners accidentally dug into the poorly documented Saxman Mine, causing 500 million tonnes of underground water to flood the Quecreek mine. All nine miners trapped by the water were eventually rescued.
Views: 495485 GFS Valhalla
Harlan County: A Road To Change (Documentary)
 
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Harlan County: A Road to Change (Completed 2014) Shows the history of coal from the early 1900s to today, the past, the turmoil, the tragedy, and how the county is using adventure tourism to share their treasures in the county. (c) 2014 Kaci Productions, LLC To use this video you must have written permission from the producer. Contact at [email protected] Be courteous in your comments. Negative comments or hateful remarks or other of the like towards the video, people of Harlan, or those commenting here, may be deleted at the producer's discretion. Music by Harlan County Underground Poem by Connie Helton Video & Aerial footage by Tammy & Jeff Hyatt Photos & zipline footage by Paula Collins Interviews by Jerry Asher & Mike O'Bradovich Opening Cast by Noah Hughs & A L Feher Narration by C Andrew Bartlett Thanks to Kentucky Coal Mining Museum & Portal 31 for access Thanks to all involved who helped bring this to life, all of your names are listed in the final credits of the documentary video.
Views: 188478 Kaci Productions
Colorado Experience: Ludlow Massacre
 
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One of the most significant events in the struggle for labor laws in America played out in Las Animas County in the spring of 1914. With the control of much of Colorado's coal mines in the hands of just a few companies, miners grew increasingly intolerant of low wages and dangerous working conditions. Despite efforts to suppress union activity, the United Mine Workers of America called a strike in September of 1913. Over the next few months, tensions escalated as the striking miners ransacked several mines. The dispute culminated in a violent clash on April 20, 1914. Despite this tragic outcome, the event sparked national outrage and led the way of workers' rights in America.
Views: 68589 Rocky Mountain PBS
Kellingley Colliery: Britain's last coal mine closes
 
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A million men used to toil beneath the ground. Coal-mining fuelled the industrial revolution and brought about the biggest industrial dispute of the last fifty years. Now Britain's last deep coal mine, Kellingley Colliery in Yorkshire, has closed. Subscribe for more like this, every day: http://bit.ly/1epe41j Dangerous world: http://bit.ly/1JCsSYb The news explained: http://bit.ly/1epgay4 Music: http://bit.ly/1RVTRNy Technology: http://bit.ly/1LI1K9y Like us on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1wQ1Gty Follow us on Twitter: http://bit.ly/1mFUjBD
Views: 29375 Channel 4 News
Racial Harmony in an Iowa Coal Mining Town in the Early 1900s
 
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African-Americans and white residents lived side by side in the small mining town of Buxton, Iowa in the early 1900s. This segment from the "Searching for Buxton" documentary features accounts from former Buxton residents. Find additional video, background information and classroom resources at: http://site.iptv.org/iowapathways/mypath/great-buxton Searching for Buxton was produced for Iowa Public Television by the Communication Research Institute of William Penn University.
COAL MINE CATASTROPHE - The Odd Case of Shawnee, OH | Abandoned Ohio
 
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Take a journey to a half-abandoned town victim to a 134-year-old coal mine fire. Shawnee is the oddest town you've never seen. Thanks for watching! Music is an adaptation of Jynweythek by Aphex Twin for piano, as well as an adaptation of Radiohead's "Daydreaming" for piano as well. Instagram - @spacebox1984 Soundcloud - soundcloud.com/crystal-lakes Bandcamp - crystallakes.bandcamp.com ♣FOLLOW GEOFF - @geoffrey.webb on Instagram Special thanks to Geoff for the extra hand with the camera. It definitely allowed me to experience the town rather than just film it.
Views: 78663 theVHSvlog
Inside a Cursed Appalachian Mining Town
 
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In the late 1800s, traveling preacher Robert Sheffey cursed the town of Ivanhoe, Virginia, after witnessing what one female resident describes as “houses of ill repute, fighting, drunkenness, and a rejection of his ministry by the townspeople.” Legend has it that Sheffey condemned the sinful town to sink into the earth and be consumed by the pits of hell. “Whether you believe in it or not, after that happened, we lost everything,” says the same Ivanhoe resident in this short documentary. “We have nothing.” Today, Ivanhoe is even plagued by sinkholes—multiple houses have disappeared entirely into the earth. Read more: https://www.theatlantic.com/video/index/555359/ivanhoe-virginia-appalachia "The Curse and the Jubilee" was directed by Ivete Lucas and Patrick Bresnan. It is part of The Atlantic Selects, an online showcase of short documentaries from independent creators, curated by The Atlantic.
Views: 555113 The Atlantic
History of Mine Safety and Health Legislation in the USA
 
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In 1891, Congress passed the first federal statute governing mine safety. This 1891 law was relatively modest legislation that applied only to mines in U.S. territories, and, among other things, established minimum ventilation requirements at underground coal mines and prohibited operators from employing children under 12 years of age. In 1910, following a decade in which the number of coal mine fatalities exceeded 2,000 annually, Congress established the Bureau of Mines as a new agency in the Department of the Interior. The Bureau was charged with the responsibility to conduct research and to reduce accidents in the coal mining industry, but was given no inspection authority until 1941, when Congress empowered federal inspectors to enter mines. In 1947, Congress authorized the formulation of the first code of federal regulations for mine safety. The Federal Coal Mine Safety Act of 1952 provided for annual inspections in certain underground coal mines, and gave the Bureau limited enforcement authority, including power to issue violation notices and imminent danger withdrawal orders. In 1966, Congress extended coverage of the 1952 Coal Act to all underground coal mines. The first federal statute directly regulating non-coal mines did not appear until the passage of the Federal Metal and Nonmetallic Mine Safety Act of 1966. The 1966 Act provided for the promulgation of standards, many of which were advisory, and for inspections and investigations; however, its enforcement authority was minimal. The Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969, generally referred to as the Coal Act, was more comprehensive and more stringent than any previous Federal legislation governing the mining industry. The Coal Act included surface as well as underground coal mines within its scope, required two annual inspections of every surface coal mine and four at every underground coal mine, and dramatically increased federal enforcement powers in coal mines. The Coal Act also required monetary penalties for all violations, and established criminal penalties for knowing and willful violations. The safety standards for all coal mines were strengthened, and health standards were adopted. The Coal Act included specific procedures for the development of improved mandatory health and safety standards, and provided compensation for miners who were totally and permanently disabled by the progressive respiratory disease caused by the inhalation of fine coal dust pneumoconiosis or "black lung". Most recently, Congress passed the Federal Mine Safety and Health Act of 1977 (Mine Act), the legislation which currently governs MSHA's activities. The Mine Act amended the 1969 Coal Act in a number of significant ways, and consolidated all federal health and safety regulations of the mining industry, coal as well as non-coal mining, under a single statutory scheme. The Mine Act strengthened and expanded the rights of miners, and enhanced the protection of miners from retaliation for exercising such rights. Mining fatalities dropped sharply under the Mine Act from 272 in 1977 to 86 in 2000. Additionally, the Mine Act established the independent Federal Mine Safety and Health Review Commission to provide for independent review of the majority of MSHA's enforcement actions. This was clipped from the 2002 MSHA video, Reflections Mining History, which shows the evolution of health and safety laws and the role of the supervisor. The entire DVD is 11 minutes in length and available from MSHA.
Views: 29958 markdcatlin
African-American coal miners on life in Appalachia
 
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"United Shades of America with W. Kamau Bell" visits coal country and finds African-American residents with a unique perspective on life in and outside eastern Kentucky's mines. Watch Sundays at 10 p.m. ET/PT.
Views: 6311 CNN
The Coal Vote: Showdown in West Virginia's Midterm Elections
 
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Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News This year's midterm elections are projected to be the most expensive in American history. One of the most notable races, where outside interests are pouring in millions of dollars, is in West Virginia's third district — and the campaign is centered on one thing: coal. The coal industry has dominated West Virginia for the past 150 years, exerting great influence over its economy and politics. Obama’s push to drastically reduce carbon emissions to combat climate change has convinced many West Virginians that the federal government is waging a “war on coal” and, in turn, on West Virginia, as mines close and jobs are cut. The backlash has placed 19-term Democratic incumbent Nick Rahall under fire for his perceived affiliation with Obama. The Koch brothers and other out-of-state energy interests have seized this opportunity to oust Rahall, leading Democratic State Senator Evan Jenkins to switch parties and run as a Republican. VICE News traveled to West Virginia's third district to cover the race between the two candidates as they fight to prove who will be coal's greatest champion, and spoke with locals about coal's outsized importance in the region. Check out "Voters In Colorado and Kansas Are Tuning Out This Year's Election" - http://bit.ly/1rE4mHB Check out "Environmental Groups Target Key Midterm Fight For North Carolina Senate Seat" - http://bit.ly/1wK2X6H Check out "Get Ready For More False Claims By Big Polluters" - http://bit.ly/1G0bLvq Check out the VICE News beta for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews
Views: 131810 VICE News
Young coal mine workers l Hidden America: Children of the Mountains PART 5/6
 
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Diane Sawyer follows 18-year-old Jeremey as he starts working in a coal mine to support his family. [Original Air Date 2/13/2009] WATCH FULL EPISODES OF 20/20: http://abc.go.com/shows/2020 SUBSCRIBE to ABC NEWS: https://www.youtube.com/ABCNews/ Watch More on http://abcnews.go.com/ LIKE ABC News on FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/abcnews FOLLOW ABC News on TWITTER: https://twitter.com/abc GOOD MORNING AMERICA'S HOMEPAGE: https://www.goodmorningamerica.com/
Views: 190198 ABC News
Working conditions during the industrial revolution
 
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i made this video for my US history class. 100%... damn straight
Views: 40190 drew langsdale
Coal Mines in America
 
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Views: 359 Jack Williams
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
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There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 194932 VICE News
Escape From Farmington No  9 An Oral History
 
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http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/mining/works/coversheet1628.html Brief description: This training video uses the experiences of two survivors of the 1968 Farmington No. 9 coal mine disaster to teach miners important lessons about self-rescue and escape procedures.
Views: 14482 NIOSH
AMERICAN COAL MINER WAR: During Matewan
 
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The American Coal Miner War West Virginia 1912-1921 "During Matewan" The 1912-13 events at Paint & Cabin Creek are known as the first of the Coal Mine Wars of West Virginia. There was a march of 5,000 miners in 1919. Then the Matewan Massacre in 1920 led to the shooting of Chief Hatfield. The only movie made about this was filmed in 1987 by John Sayles. Finally with the help of Mother Jones and Bill Blizzard, apx. 15,000 armed miners attacked apx. 1,500 Company thugs, State Police, & 2,000 U.S. Military units in the Battle of Blair Mountain. The "RedNeck Army" (named for red cloth around their neck) surrendered when the U.S. Air Force threatened to bomb them. In 2005, the West Virginia Archives and History Commission voted unanimously to recommend to the National Park Service that 1,600 acres of Blair Mountain be included on the National Register. Coal mining companies and nearby landowners promptly sued to overturn the nomination. The Sierra Club moved to join the suit, and in May 2006 a West Virginia judge granted the Club's participation. That same month, the National Trust for Historic Preservation placed the Blair Mountain battlefield on its list of America's 11 Most Endangered Places. The United Mine Workers union also came out in support of the National Register listing because of its importance to the labor movement. Bibliography: "When Miners March"; William Blizzard "Thunder in the Mountains"; Lon Savage "WV Mine Wars"; David A. Corbin "Battle of Blair Mountain"; Robert Shogun
Views: 46975 SCODgreenhood
Coal Companies Erasing American Labor History | Blair Mountain (Professor Chuck Keeney Interview)
 
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The Government is working with coal companies to erase violent American labor history. "Battle of Blair Mountain: Mine Wars & Rednecks" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=chL97vxY2Vs Sadly, my short video about Blair Mt. got removed: https://medium.com/@0rf/my-blair-mountain-video-was-removed-a7215b17ca8 Support independent media! ▶https://www.patreon.com/Orf Hi, I'm Matt Orfalea :) ▶https://twitter.com/0rf ▶https://medium.com/@0rf ▶https://facebook.com/matt.orfalea
Views: 699 Matt Orfalea
PBS American Experience Mine Wars
 
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PBS American Experience Mine Wars American Experience - The Mine Wars (PBS) West Virginia coal operators built small, company-owned towns for their miners to live in. The coal towns were almost always unincorporated; there were no . Premieres 9pm, Wednesday 29 June on Freesat 156 | Sky 534 | Virgin Media 276 Following its European premiere at the Sheffield Doc Fest, this documentary .
Views: 9007 Gary Treto
Monongah 1907 Mine Disaster
 
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This short clip is from Davitt McAteer's 1985 25-minutes video - Monongah 1907. The entire video, rich with detail about this disaster also traces the development of mine safety laws in the US. Monongah 1907 is now available on DVD for $14.95. For ordering information, send an email to: [email protected] . And don't miss Davitt McAteer's book, Monongah: The Tragic Story of the 1907 Monongah Mine Disaster, the Worst Industrial Accident in U.S. History, recently published by the West Virginia University Press (2007) http://www.wvupress.com. "When I heard that Davitt McAteer was working on a book detailing the unparalleled disaster at the Monongah mines, I though it promising news ... no one is positioned better than Davitt MsAteer to examine the Monongah mining disaster of 1907 from all the perspectives required: historical, sociological, legal, and economic. Monongah is an important book, long overdue." From the Introduction by Robert B. Reich, former Secretary of the US Department of Labor, 1993 to 1997. Davitt McAteer, ESQ., a native of West Virginia, has devoted much of his professional efforts to mine health and safety issues. During the 1970s, Davitt led the safety and health programs of the United Mine Workers and founded the Occupational Safety and Health Law Center. During the Clinton Administration, he served as the Assistant Secretary for Mine Safety and Health at the United States Department of Labor. In January of 2006, West Virginia Governor Joe Manchin asked Mr. McAteer to serve as personal advisor and conduct an independent investigation into the cause or causes of the Sago Mine Disaster and the Aracoma Alma No. 1 Mine Fire, both of which occurred in January 2006.
Views: 50518 markdcatlin
Coal mine dragline makes a big move
 
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13-million pound dragline makes its longest walk ever, from one mining area to another in North Dakota. Dragline is owned by The Coteau Properties Company. www.basinelectric.com
Views: 167262 Basin Electric
The Dangers of Coal mining in Industrial America
 
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History 2112 Movie Project 2012
Views: 275 kandieday
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
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Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 4035 GeologicalSociety
Coal Strike in 1900 Affects Presidential Politics
 
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A strike of coal miners organized by the United Mine Workers (UMW) in 1900 becomes an issue in the McKinley-Bryan contest for the presidency.
Views: 16887 danieljbmitchell
AMERICAN EPIC | 1920’s Coal Miners strike | PBS
 
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Official website: http://to.pbs.org/2pzOUDG | #AmericanEpic Bill Williamson recalls the 1920’s Coal Miners strike in Logan, West Virginia Subscribe to the PBS channel for more clips: https://www.youtube.com/user/PBS/featured Enjoy full episodes of your favorite PBS programs at pbs.org/video. Like PBS on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pbs/ Follow PBS on Twitter: https://twitter.com/PBS Follow PBS on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/PBS Official website: http://www.pbs.org/ Get PBS merchandise: http://www.shoppbs.org/home/index.jsp Go inside one of the greatest-ever untold stories: how the ordinary people of America were given the opportunity to make records for the first time.
Views: 2806 PBS
On Coal River - Full Movie | Snagfilms
 
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Coal River Valley, West Virginia is a community surrounded by lush mountains and a looming toxic threat. Filmed over a period of five years, ON COAL RIVER follows a former miner and his neighbors in a David-and-Goliath struggle for the future of their valley, their children, and life as they know it. Ed Wiley once worked at the same coal plant that threatens his granddaughter's elementary school. When his local government refuses to act, Ed embarks on a quest to have the school relocated to safer ground. With a sharp sense of right and wrong, Ed confronts his local school board, the state government, and a notorious coal company for putting his granddaughter and his community at risk. Download Our Apple or Android Apps: http://bit.ly/Snag_Apps Watch Free Movies Online: http://bit.ly/snag_films Like Us On Facebook: http://bit.ly/snag_fb Follow Us On Twitter: http://bit.ly/Snag_Tweets
Views: 11987 SnagFilms

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