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Cornwall, England: Cornish Pride
 
01:35
More info about travel in Cornwall: https://www.ricksteves.com/europe/england/cornwall Cornwall was part of a "Celtic crescent" that nearly circles England. The Cornish people spoke their own language, which thrived for centuries. Cornwall is a county of England, but many native-born locals consider themselves Cornish first, British second. At http://www.ricksteves.com, you'll find money-saving travel tips, small-group tours, guidebooks, TV shows, radio programs, podcasts, and more on this destination.
Views: 19657 Rick Steves' Europe
Hot Fuzz (4/10) Movie CLIP - Sea Mine (2007) HD
 
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Hot Fuzz movie clips: http://j.mp/1uwjDCy BUY THE MOVIE: http://amzn.to/uoaVE7 Don't miss the HOTTEST NEW TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/1u2y6pr CLIP DESCRIPTION: Angel (Simon Pegg) and Danny (Nick Frost) discover a huge cache of weapons hidden at a local farm. FILM DESCRIPTION: A top London cop who is so good at his job that he makes his fellow officers look like slackers by comparison is "promoted" to serve in the sleepy village of Sandford in this contemporary action comedy from the creators of Shaun of the Dead. Police constable Nicholas Angel (Simon Pegg) always gets his man, but these days his impeccable record seems to be more indicative of his fellow officers' shortcomings than his own formidable skills as a keeper of the peace. Loathe to stand idly by as their once respectable track record is steadily soiled by the hyper-competent actions of one lone overachiever, Sergeant Angel's superiors at the Met soon determine to remedy their problem by relocating the decorated constable to the West Country village of Sanford -- where tranquil garden parties and neighborhood watch meetings stand in stark contrast to the violent crime and heated gunplay of the city. As Sergeant Angel does his best to adjust to the relative calm of his new environment, his oafish new partner Danny Butterman (Nick Frost) strives to gain the respect of his fellow constables while sustaining himself on fantasies of his favorite action films and police shows. Later, just as it begins to appear as if Sergeant Angel has been relegated to an uneventful existence in the relative calm of the countryside, a series of horrific "accidents" lead him to suspect that the tranquil hamlet of Sanford has fallen prey to a sinister plot which reeks of foul play. Jim Broadbent, Timothy Dalton, Steve Coogan, and Martin Freeman co-star in the Edgar Wright film. CREDITS: TM & © Universal (2007) Cast: David Bradley, Nick Frost, Karl Johnson, Simon Pegg Director: Edgar Wright Producers: Karen Beever, Eric Fellner, Nira Park, Ronaldo Vasconcellos, Natascha Wharton, Tim Bevan Screenwriters: Simon Pegg, Edgar Wright WHO ARE WE? The MOVIECLIPS channel is the largest collection of licensed movie clips on the web. Here you will find unforgettable moments, scenes and lines from all your favorite films. Made by movie fans, for movie fans. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR MOVIE CHANNELS: MOVIECLIPS: http://bit.ly/1u2yaWd ComingSoon: http://bit.ly/1DVpgtR Indie & Film Festivals: http://bit.ly/1wbkfYg Hero Central: http://bit.ly/1AMUZwv Extras: http://bit.ly/1u431fr Classic Trailers: http://bit.ly/1u43jDe Pop-Up Trailers: http://bit.ly/1z7EtZR Movie News: http://bit.ly/1C3Ncd2 Movie Games: http://bit.ly/1ygDV13 Fandango: http://bit.ly/1Bl79ye Fandango FrontRunners: http://bit.ly/1CggQfC HIT US UP: Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1y8M8ax Twitter: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt Pinterest: http://bit.ly/14wL9De Tumblr: http://bit.ly/1vUwhH7
Views: 1047938 Movieclips
Tips To Learn Languages From The 10 Language Twins
 
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The Super Polyglot Brothers are Matthew and Michael, twins who have been learning languages together since the age of 8. Here they share tips for language learners, and more. Learn a language like never before: http://bit.ly/2o1M2jU The twins discuss how they use multiple languages in their daily lives, reveal how learning one language makes learning a second and third even easier (if they’re in the same language family), and why they plan to learn Cornish (Kernowek) as their next language. Read about more language learning tips here: http://bit.ly/2C0w960 Follow us on social media: 💡https://www.facebook.com/babbel.languages/ 💡 https://twitter.com/babbel 💡 https://www.instagram.com/babbel/
Views: 599694 Babbel
10 Fantastic Beasts of English Myth and Legend
 
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Support our efforts to make videos about what we want: https://www.patreon.com/toptenz/overview Check my other channel TodayIFoundOut! https://www.youtube.com/user/TodayIFoundOut →Subscribe for new videos every day! https://www.youtube.com/user/toptenznet?sub_confirmation=1 Find more lists at: http://www.toptenz.net Entertaining and educational top 10 lists from TopTenzNet! Subscribe to our Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TopTenz/ Business inquiries to a[email protected] Other TopTenz Videos: Top 10 Popular Urban Legends & Myths https://youtu.be/Xh2ZzUcYbQA Top 10 Urban Legends You've Probably Never Heard Of https://youtu.be/4WmuYFBsh8c Text version: https://www.toptenz.net/10-fantastic-beasts-of-english-myth-and-legend.php Coming up: 10. Habetrot 9. Pig-faced Women 8. Blue Caps 7. The Eachy 6. Lubber Fiends 5. Church Grims 4. Spriggans 3. Sooterkin 2. Grindylows 1. Black Annis Source/Further reading: http://www.sacred-texts.com/neu/eng/meft/meft39.htm http://www.britishmuseum.org/research/collection_online/collection_object_details.aspx?objectId=1645997&partId=1 http://www.dmm.org.uk/educate/mineocc.htm#p https://2.bp.blogspot.com/-HW5vKglYJ7Y/UGxQykPJvbI/AAAAAAAABt4/rq_J_X0FkXI/s1600/GillMan.jpg https://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-lubber-fiend/ https://www.gutenberg.org/files/43286/43286-h/43286-h.htm https://archive.org/stream/englishdialectdi05wrig#page/690/mode/1up https://archive.org/stream/femalephysicianc00maub#page/375/mode/1up http://harrypotter.wikia.com/wiki/Grindylow http://www.thiswasleicestershire.co.uk/2012/09/the-tale-of-black-annis.html http://comet.cool/static/media/blog/mythical-creatures.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Douglas-Scottish_FFT(1901)-p109-Habitrot-illustr-J_Torrance.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41JMvRGDbqL.jpg https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51RCtFzOQhL._SX311_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Pig-faced_Lady_and_the_Spanish_Mule.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Miss_Atkinson,_a_woman_with_a_pig%27s_head._Coloured_engraving_Wellcome_V0006969.jpg https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Pig-faced_Lady_of_Manchester_Square.jpg https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A4%D0%B0%D0%B9%D0%BB:Battle_of_Waterloo_1815.PNG https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tannakin_Skinker.jpg https://ru.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A4%D0%B0%D0%B9%D0%BB:Child_coal_miners_(1908).jpg
Views: 49153 TopTenz
Richard Jose "May, Sweet May" (January 12, 1904) Victor Talking Machine Company rare countertenor
 
01:59
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. Edward Le Roy Rice states in Monarchs of Minstrelsy (Kenny Publishing Company, 1911) that Leighton--born in Bradford, England--"has a peculiarly pleasing high-tenor voice." The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 33 Tim Gracyk
Richard Jose "May, Sweet May" (January 12, 1904) Victor Talking Machine Company rare countertenor
 
02:04
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. Edward Le Roy Rice states in Monarchs of Minstrelsy (Kenny Publishing Company, 1911) that Leighton--born in Bradford, England--"has a peculiarly pleasing high-tenor voice." The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 29 Tim Gracyk
Richard Jose "May, Sweet May" (January 12, 1904)  Victor Talking Machine Company rare countertenor
 
01:59
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. Edward Le Roy Rice states in Monarchs of Minstrelsy (Kenny Publishing Company, 1911) that Leighton--born in Bradford, England--"has a peculiarly pleasing high-tenor voice." The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 438 Tim Gracyk
Ed Sheeran - Perfect Symphony (with Andrea Bocelli)
 
05:34
Stream or download this version: https://ad.gt/perfectyt ÷. Out Now: https://atlanti.cr/yt-album Subscribe to Ed's channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeToEdSheeran Sign-up to Andrea Bocelli's mailing list: https://decca.lnk.to/BocelliSignUpID Follow Ed on... Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EdSheeranMusic Twitter: http://twitter.com/edsheeran Instagram: http://instagram.com/teddysphotos Official Website: http://edsheeran.com International Production Managers: Francesco Pasquero & Ed Howard Production company: Strani Rumori Studio Executive producer: Ivano Berti Production coordinator: Luca Scota Directed by Tiziano Fioriti DOP: Cristian Alberini Cinematography: Cristian Alberini, Tiziano Fioriti, Luca Scota, Michele Ragni Editing: Tiziano Fioriti, Luca Scota for Strani Rumori Studio, Francesco Pasquero for Sugar Srl. Grading: Tiziano Fioriti & Luca Scota for Strani Rumori Studio Sound mix: Vanni Tagliavento Gaffer: Matteo Fioriti Set Designer: Bartalini Alberto & Ilaria Andrea Bocelli appears courtesy of Sugar Sr.
Views: 157587129 Ed Sheeran
Walton-on-Thames Model Railway Exhibition 2018 - All Saints Church Hall, Hersham 29th September 2018
 
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Walton-on-Thames Model Railway Exhibition 2018. – All Saints Church Hall, Hersham 29th September 2018 A good variety of layouts and gauges on display, we hope you enjoy. Nitun – OO Gauge – 1965ish 3rd rail BR(S) ‘Nictun Borrud’ is a layout which was based on the US Army building a branch line during WWII. Had it been rebuilt it would have come from the Meon Valley Line to Southwick House just behind Portsdown Hill, near Portsmouth. Adlestrop – O Gauge – Set in 1918 toward the end of the First World War. It represents a village in “middle England” during the conflict, served by a branch line station. Hampton Vale - OO9 Gauge – A rural terminal station, together with local mill and sidings. Military (Model) Railway Display – A selection of military railway vehicles, along with a collection of tanks and similar equipment. Holm - OO Gauge – ‘Holm’ was built with the aim of using rolling stock, buildings etc., which were readily available in model shops. The name of Holm comes from two islands, Flat Holm and Steep Holm, which are in the Bristol Channel between Barry and Western-super-Mare. Children's Corner - OO Gauge – This is designed primarily for use by Children Broad Pass - Z Gauge It is based on the 469 mile railroad line between Steward and Fairbanks, the one and only main line in the state of Alaska. City Basin Goods - N Gauge – depicts a gently decaying urban freight yard in the late 1960s/early 1970s on the Western Region of British Rail. Saint Judes Les Mines - HO Gauge – This is a minor station on the French secondaries (in British terms, a light railway) and is operated by the SNCF. There are several rail served industries, including the brickworks which features an automatic narrow gauge railway. Questa - On30 Gauge – A small town in New Mexico, situated in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains (Spanish for “Blood of Christ”) the subrange of the Rocky Mountains. Gas Lane - OO Gauge – A compact gas works setting which portrays goods operation in an industrial setting. Coleford - OO9 Gauge based on a real railway in the Forest of Dean with History having been changed a little… The railway from Coleford to Monmouth had its origins as a 3’ 6” gauge plateway, the Monmouth Tramway carrying coal, clay and lime to the river Wye at Monmouth. Dudley Road - OO Gauge is a small light maintenance depot on the west side of Birmingham, built on the remains of an old LMS engine shed/maintenance depot, how part of an industrial estate not far from the WCML now that the old signal box and control system has gone. Thornhill Town - OO Gauge – This is a G.W.R branch line, based loosely on Bodmin in Cornwall. Creeque Alley Brewery - OO Gauge. A small industrial layout using the Brewery’s own locomotives to move various wagons around the site. We hope you enjoy the video. Anne and Steve Steam and Model Railways Music credit: Ghost'n'Ghost - Coconut Mystery. Orbital Music
ISN'T IT ROMANTIC - Official Trailer
 
02:25
Trapped in a rom-com like…😱 Watch the new trailer for #IsntItRomantic, only in theaters Valentine’s Day! http://www.facebook.com/IsntItRomantic/ http://twitter.com/IsntItRomantic http://www.instagram.com/isntitromantic/ -- From New Line Cinema comes the romantic comedy “Isn’t It Romantic,” starring Rebel Wilson (“How to Be Single,” the “Pitch Perfect” films), Liam Hemsworth (the “Hunger Games” films), Adam Devine (“The Intern,” the “Pitch Perfect” films) and Priyanka Chopra (“Quantico,” “Baywatch”), under the direction of Todd Strauss-Schulson (“A Very Harold & Kumar 3D Christmas,” “The Final Girls”). New York City architect Natalie works hard to get noticed at her job but is more likely to be asked to deliver coffee and bagels than to design the city’s next skyscraper. And if things weren’t bad enough, Natalie, a lifelong cynic when it comes to love, has an encounter with a mugger that renders her unconscious, waking to discover that her life has suddenly become her worst nightmare—a romantic comedy—and she is the leading lady. Wilson stars as Natalie, alongside Liam Hemsworth as Blake, a handsome client; Adam Devine as her earnest best friend, Josh; and Priyanka Chopra as yoga ambassador Isabella. Strauss-Schulson directs from a screenplay by Erin Cardillo and Dana Fox & Katie Silberman. Todd Garner (“Paul Blart: Mall Cop,” “Tag”), Gina Matthews and Grant Scharbo (“13 Going on 30,” “What Women Want”) are producing, with Marty Ewing (“IT,” “The Accountant”) and Rebel Wilson executive producing. Collaborating with Strauss-Schulson behind the scenes are director of photography Simon Duggan (“The Great Gatsby,” “Hacksaw Ridge”), production designer Sharon Seymour (“Argo,” “The Town”), editor Andrew Marcus (“Begin Again,” “Sing Street”), and costume designer Leah Katznelson (“How to Be Single,” “Sleeping with Other People”). New Line Cinema presents, in association with Bron Creative, a Broken Road/Little Engine Production, “Isn’t It Romantic.” Slated for release on February 14, 2019, and will be distributed worldwide by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company. The film has been rated PG-13.
Views: 7445362 Warner Bros. Pictures
Learn Punjabi | 1000 Punjabi language speaking sentences through English ਪੰਜਾਬੀ ਸਿੱਖੋ | Full course
 
02:41:07
पंजाबी सीखो Learn 1000 Punjabi language speaking sentences and जानो the meaning of Punjabi words, phrases, pronunciation & vocabulary. This is the part 1 of 2 parts of this Spoken Punjabi lesson in 5 days. In this video, Ifactner teaches most common Punjabi words and sentences, with meaning and examples through English for learning and speaking daily use Punjabi in few days. This videos elaborates the meaning of 1000 Punjabi vocabulary words and phrases through English. It shows the correct pronunciation, how and when to use the Punjabi sentences in conversation. Many times beginners face problems in learning new words, memorizing the meaning of new sentences, understanding the native Punjabi speakers or speaking in the right accent. In this full Punjabi learning and speaking training video, ifactner gives English to Punjabi translation of most common sentences and make the learning easy by repeating each sentence three times. This video is helpful for beginners, kids, tourists, people appearing in competitive exams like Bank PO, SSC CGL, TOEFL, IELTS, GMAT, etc. and for people who want to communicate with people from Punjabi, India and Pakistan. Learn Punjabi through English in 5 days and improve spoken and written Punjabi. Simple English language used in the video is for the benefit of all the people from around the world who understand the language especially Indians and Pakistanis. You should practice the Punjabi words and sentences taught in this video with your friends, family, colleagues, other learners and Punjabi speakers. Please like, share and comment! Watch other related videos of ifactner: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A-wxybZniEE&list=PLtBV6zZI13pbgmzmpVWf91Nu-RqhlbpVu Visit me on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/ifactner https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCJcJA8TA9qM0pPMStF7uaEA is a Hindi, Urdu, English, Punjabi video channel to teach you different languages. This channel also shows video tutorials on web development, personality development and computer networking.
Views: 237045 ifactner
Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170
 
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Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170. Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in the 1890s, such as "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 1187 Tim Gracyk
Ed Sheeran - Photograph (Official Music Video)
 
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Download on iTunes: http://smarturl.it/x-itunesdlx Listen on Spotify: http://smarturl.it/stream.photograph Directed by Emil Nava Subscribe to Ed's channel: http://bit.ly/SubscribeToEdSheeran Follow Ed on... Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/EdSheeranMusic Twitter: http://twitter.com/edsheeran Instagram: http://instagram.com/teddysphotos Official Website: http://edsheeran.com ** The best artists, the best albums, the best price ** Get the FREE app now & be the first to discover TOP MUSIC DEALS http://Smarturl.it/top-music-deal
Views: 749617776 Ed Sheeran
Saint Ia of Ireland & Cornwall, England (+450) ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* ORTHODOX HEART
 
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http://smileofireland.blogspot.com SMILE OF IRELAND http://gkiouzelis.blogspot.com ABEL GKIOUZELIS ♫•(¯`v´¯) ¸.•*¨* ◦.(¯`:☼:´¯) ..✿.(.^.)•.¸¸.•`•.¸¸✿ ✩¸ ¸.•¨ ​ http://gkiouzelis.wordpress.com ABEL-TASOS GKIOUZELIS: MY HEART SITES https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCh-SyalvYgc5U1aGoeXAWRg YOU TUBE​​ - Orthodox Heart Videos​ https://vimeo.com/gkiouzelis VIMEO https://plus.google.com/u/0/+TasosGkiouzelis/posts ​G+​ https://twitter.com/TasosGkiouzelis TWITTER http://orthodox-heart-sites.blogspot.com ORTHODOX HEART SITES ╰⊰¸¸.•¨* NEW http://workersectingreece.wordpress.com FROM WORKER SECT TO ORTHODOXY http://ex2x2lettersfromgreece.wordpress.com EX 2X2 LETTERS FROM GREECE (English​,​​ etc.​) http://holyconfessionofyourheart.wordpress.com HOLY CONFESSION OF YOUR HEART http://paintingleaves.blogspot.com PAINTING LEAVES http://smileofireland.blogspot.com SMILE OF IRELAND (English​,​​ etc.​) http://walkingbytheseaorthodoxy.wordpress.com WALKING BY THE SEA - ORTHODOXY http://synaxarion-hagiology.blogspot.com SYNAXARION - HAGIOLOGY Saints Book http://philippinesofmyheart.wordpress.com PHILIPPINES OF MY HEART (Filippo​ etc.​) http://orthodox-heart.blogspot.com ORTHODOX HEART Orthodox Videos http://koreaofmyheart.wordpress.com KOREA OF MY HEART (Korean​ etc.​) http://animalsofmyheart.wordpress.com ANIMALS OF MY HEART http://orthodox-synaxarion.blogspot.com SAINTS BOOK - ORTHODOX SYNAXARION (English) http://newyorkofmyheart.wordpress.com NEW YORK OF MY HEART http://serbiaofyourheart.wordpress.com SERBIA OF YOUR HEART (Serbian, etc.) http://armeniaofmyheart.wordpress.com ARMENIA OF MY HEART (Armenian, etc.) http://portugalofmyheart.wordpress.com PORTUGAL OF MY HEART​​ (​Portuguese​,​ ​etc.)​ http://newzealandofmyheart.wordpress.com NEW ZEALAND OF MY HEART http://christisrisenheart.blogspot.com "CHRIST IS RISEN" HEART http://divine-liturgie-orthodoxe.blogspot.com DIVINE LITURGIE ORTHODOXY (French​,​​ etc.​) http://orthodoxyislove.wordpress.com ORTHODOXY IS LOVE http://thesmileofgodinyourheart.tumblr.com THE SMILE OF GOD IN YOUR HEART http://linksjourney.wordpress.com LINKS JOURNEY - ST BRENDAN THE NAVIGATOR http://irelandofmyheart.wordpress.com IRELAND OF MY HEART (Irish​, etc.​) http://celticholywells.wordpress.com CELTIC HOLY WELLS http://norwayofmyheart.wordpress.com NORWAY OF MY HEART (Norwegian​, etc.​) http://canadaofmyheart.wordpress.com CANADA OF MY HEART http://stjohnmaximovitchofsanfrancisco.wordpress.com ST JOHN MAXIMOVITCH OF SAN FRANCISCO, CA, USA http://whataboutyoga.wordpress.com WHAT ABOUT YOGA http://japanofmyheart.wordpress.com JAPAN OF MY HEART (Japanese​,​​ etc.​) http://irelandandbritishisles.wordpress.com IRELAND & BRITISH ISLES http://hawaiiofmyheart.wordpress.com HAWAII OF MY HEART http://italyofmyheart.wordpress.com ITALY OF MY HEART (Italian​,​​ etc.​) http://russiaofmyheart.wordpress.com RUSSIA OF MY HEART (Russian​,​​ etc.​) http://saintninageorgiaofmyheart.wordpress.com SAINT NINA & GEORGIA OF MY HEART (Georgian​,​​ etc.​) http://usaofmyheart.wordpress.com USA OF MY HEART http://riversideofmyheart.wordpress.com RIVERSIDE OF MY HEART, CALIFORNIA, USA (English) http://rejoicecelticsaints.wordpress.com REJOICE CELTIC SAINTS​​ http://orthodoxsaintvalentine.wordpress.com ORTHODOX SAINT VALENTINE http://christisrisenindeedheisrisen.wordpress.com CHRIST IS RISEN! INDEED HE IS RISEN! http://romancatholicsmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com ROMAN CATHOLIC​S​ MET ORTHODOXY http://atheistsmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com ATHEISTS MET ORTHODOXY http://vietnamofmyheart.wordpress.com VIETNAM OF MY HEART (Vietnamese​ etc.​) http://greatbritainofmyheart.wordpress.com GREAT BRITAIN OF MY HEART http://videosofmyheart.wordpress.com VIDEOS OF MY HEART https://nativeamericansmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com NATIVE AMERICANS MET ORTHODOXY https://heartquestionsandanswers.wordpress.com HEART QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS http://creationtruthorthodoxy.wordpress.com CREATION TRUTH ORTHODOXY http://earthage10000yearsold.wordpress.com EARTH AGE 10,000 YEARS OLD http://hippiesmetorthodoxy.wordpress.com HIPPIES MET ORTHODOXY http://latinamericaofmyheart.wordpress.com LATIN AMERICA OF MY HEART (Spanish​,​​ etc.​) http://americaofmyheart.wordpress.com AMERICA OF MY HEART http://africaofmyheart.wordpress.com AFRICA OF MY HEART (Afrikaans​, Swahili,​​ etc.​) http://arizonaofmyheart.wordpress.com ARIZONA OF MY HEART http://australiasaintpaisiosofmyheart.wordpress.com AUSTRALIA & SAINT PAISIOS OF MY HEART http://heartmusicheart.wordpress.com HEART MUSIC HEART http://taiwanhongkongofmyheart.wordpress.com TAIWAN & HONG KONG OF MY HEART (Chinese​, etc.​) http://flashmobofmyheart.wordpress.com FLASH MOB OF MY HEART http://californiaofmyheart.wordpress.com CALIFORNIA OF MY HEART http://edelweissofmyheart.wordpress.com EDELWEISS OF MY HEART (German​, etc.​)
BOLIVIA: MINERS LAUNCH PROTEST AGAINST PLANS TO PRIVATISE TIN MINES
 
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Natural Sound Bolivian miners and their families have launched a protest against government plans to privatise a lucrative tin mine. 25-hundred miners have occupied the Posokoni hill mine since Friday. Hundreds more have marched through the streets of Oruro, 260 kilometers (152 miles) from the capital, La Paz. Miners and their families chanted anti-government slogans through the streets of Oruro, Bolivia, on Saturday, demanding jobs at the lucrative Posokoni mine. The mine lies in the mineral rich Huanuni region which the government is planning to sell into foreign ownership. Wives and supporters donned helmets and took to the streets of the nearby town of Oruro in support of colleagues who have occupied the mine since Friday. Many criticised the government under President Gonzalo Sanchez de Lozada. An estimated 25-hundred miners staging the sit-in at Posokoni were unblocking shafts in order to gain access to the mineral deposits. Posokoni tin is rated among the best in the world and is therefore likely to attract much interest from foreign buyers. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) "The present government is intending to give away our riches to different foreign companies, and we don't want that. What we want is that they give these riches to us so that we can work them." SUPERCAPTION: Eduardo Mollinedo, member of miners' cooperative Miners in Bolivia work in cooperatives which are allocated specific mining rights by the state. Many of these mines have been exhausted and can no longer sustain the livelihoods of those people who work them. Without profitable land to mine, many families would be left with nothing. SOUNDBITE: (Spanish) "There are about 2,500 of us occupying, so that they allocate areas to us here in this place, Posokoni hill, where we get the tin for our livelihood." SUPER CAPTION: Eduardo Mollinedo, member of miners' cooperative The demonstration comes at a fragile time for President Lozada. Bolivia enters a general election on Sunday and Lozada is seeking a further term as president. Many Bolivians do not support his privatisation plans and there is public sympathy for the miners. Some of those living close to Posokoni have offered miners, who've come to protest from other regions, a roof over their heads while the demonstration continues. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/aaaf798ded67bfe39ad961f139db83f8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 83 AP Archive
Mine Disaster (1924)
 
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Wrexham, Clwyd, Wales. Heroes of the mine. 9 killed in fire-damp explosion. Automatic doors saved other 415 workers underground at the time. M/S of several carts, strung together and running on tracks, being pulled out of a mine tunnel, two miners stand in one the carts. M/S of several miners and two policemen standing outside a shack at the top of the mine shaft. M/S of miners loading the trunk of a tree onto one of the carts, the carts are sent down the mine shaft - presumably the wood is for repair work to the explosion damaged mine. High angled L/S of the colliery in a typical Welsh valley, smoke rises from several chimneys. M/S of a miner leading a policeman and two men in trilbies through the colliery. M/S of a group of men, some miners, some more smartly dressed - safety inspectors, perhaps? C/U of railway freight truck with the words - LLAY MAIN - painted on the side. M/S of a group of miners standing with a policeman and a man in a trilby. M/S of two men wearing gas mask-like contraptions with pipes and wires that wind around their torsos. Various shots of the colliery, including shot of the mine lift shaft. Amendment November 2011: A visitor to the site has commented that this clip only shows Llay Main Colliery disaster of 1924 in the second half. The first half of the clip contains footage of a different, drift mine. FILM ID:366.03 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 2293 British Pathé
Europe for Foodies: Cheap Eats and Street Food with Cameron Hewitt | Rick Steves Travel Talks
 
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"Foodie" doesn't have to mean "expensive." And in this travel talk, Rick Steves' Europe guidebook co-author Cameron Hewitt offers tips on fully experiencing Europe's foodie scene without busting your budget: seeking out local street food (from Dutch herring and German Wurst to Belgian frites and Cornish pasties), visiting street markets, and assembling a world-class European picnic. Planning a trip to Europe? You’ll find lots of free travel information at https://www.ricksteves.com. For Cameron's foodie blog, visit https://blog.ricksteves.com/cameron/category/food/ This video is an excerpt from a full-length, one-hour Europe for Foodies talk. You can watch the entire talk here: https://youtu.be/irvNmrfff94 Or you can watch the other chapters from this talk: Europe for Foodies 101: https://youtu.be/pPwzZlGvGdA Restaurant-Finding Tips: https://youtu.be/MEXmMQx5uGY Eating Tips and Tricks: https://youtu.be/-YQhI5ywUqE Drinks and Sweets: https://youtu.be/3gQ-8yCOWpE Foodie Experiences: https://youtu.be/TQSZtKMPhVc Recorded on March 3, 2018 • Rick Steves' Europe Travel Center Written and Presented by Cameron Hewitt Produced by Cameron Hewitt Filmed and Edited by Zen Wolfang Photography by Cameron Hewitt, Dominic Arizona Bonuccelli, Rick Steves, and others Graphics by Heather Locke and Rhonda Pelikan © 2018 Rick Steves' Europe, Inc. www.ricksteves.com
How important is tin today?
 
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twitter : @ceepackaging http://www.ceepackaging.com https://www.facebook.com/pages/CEE-Packaging/135108923181666 https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alan-Heaths-History-Page/173472422695696 http://www.youtube.com/alanheath Speaking at Fach Pack in Nuremburg on 29 September 2009, Tony Beer of the Dutch company The Box bv speaks on the importance of tin. He believes that tin offers the possibility of long term branding as it comes in packaging that is not thrown away. My channel on you tube : http://www.youtube.com/alanheath is one of the most prolific from Poland. I have produced a number of films, most in English but also in Polish, French, Italian, Spanish and the occasional hint of German and Hebrew. My big interest in life is travel and history but I have also placed films on other subjects There are a number of films here on the packaging industry. This is because I am the publisher of Central and Eastern European Packaging -- http://www.ceepackaging.com - the international platform for the packaging industry in this region focussing on the latest innovations, trends, design, branding, legislation and environmental issues with in-depth profiles of major industry achievers. Most people may think packaging pretty boring but it possibly effects your life more than you really imagine!
Views: 74 Alan Heath
Europe for Foodies with Cameron Hewitt | Rick Steves Travel Talks
 
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Rick Steves' Europe guidebook co-author (and foodie) Cameron Hewitt explains how food is a window into the culture, history, and landscape of a place...and it's delicious, too. Equal parts inspirational and informative, this travel talk explains how food and culture are interrelated, and how age-old European food concepts have become newly trendy stateside. Cameron also offers practical tips on how to find memorable restaurants, navigate European dining and drinking customs, track down affordable street food, and take part in foodie experiences like cooking classes and agriturismo visits. Planning a trip to Europe? You’ll find lots of free travel information at https://www.ricksteves.com. For Cameron's foodie blog, visit https://blog.ricksteves.com/cameron/category/food/ Recorded on March 3, 2018 • Rick Steves' Europe Travel Center Written and Presented by Cameron Hewitt Produced by Cameron Hewitt Filmed and Edited by Zen Wolfang Photography by Cameron Hewitt, Dominic Arizona Bonuccelli, Rick Steves, and others Graphics by Heather Locke and Rhonda Pelikan © 2018 Rick Steves' Europe, Inc. www.ricksteves.com
Richard Jose sings Paul Dresser hymn "Glory to God" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904
 
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Jose recorded several hymns, which suited his high voice wonderfully. Richard Jose's story reads like a Horatio Alger tale: a penniless boy rises to the top of his profession, enjoying renown and even fortune. His wife Therese (he married Therese Shreve of Carson City, Nevada on July 20, 1898) recalled in an article written for The Pony Express, a publication she edited, that Harry Von Tilzer presented her with "a huge sunburst diamond broach" in gratitude for her husband making a hit of the 1900 song "A Bird In a Gilded Cage." She says Charles K. Harris likewise presented a diamond necklace in gratitude for her husband's help in popularizing "After the Ball." Unfortunately, Therese is given to exaggeration and overstatement, and all her statements should be take with a grain of salt. Jose worked closely with composer Paul Dresser. In his 1944 book They All Had Glamour, Edward Marks lists many Dresser songs popularized by Jose. Therese Jose stated her husband even went into the publishing business with Dresser. Oscar Lewis' history of San Francisco's Palace Hotel, titled Bonanza Inn, tells of an Examiner reporter late for an interview with the famous conductor Walter Damrosch because the reporter had been detained elsewhere by the beauty of Jose singing to the accompaniment of Dresser himself. The reporter was too caught up in the music--"hypnotized," he announced--to be on time. The reporter's first words to the famous Wagnerian conductor were of praise for the beauty of Jose singing Dresser's "A Mother's Grave." The History of Boston Theatre, published in 1908, records that when Jose left a Boston stage after singing on the night of April 5, 1891 (he sang encore after encore), the happy audience rose en masse and likewise left the theatre--despite the fact that several other numbers remained on the program, including the popular Rigoletto quartet. Historian Charles Hamm states in Yesterdays that Jose's instinct for a hit was not perfect. When given the chance in 1892 to introduce Charles Harris' new "After the Ball," Jose at first advised Harris that an earlier tune called "Kiss and Let's Make Up" was superior. Jose was with the Primrose and West Minstrels at that time. He was born in England in the Cornish village Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows Jose as being born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates. Jose's wife cites 1869 in her account of the singer's life in a 1968 edition of The Pony Express though a 1978 edition of the same corrects the year to 1862. The singer's 1941 death certificate cites 1872, off by ten years. Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling and indicates how Jose is pronounced in Cornwall, where it is an ordinary name. Although Victor catalogs give a Spanish pronunciation ("hoh-zay") and the singer evidently adopted this pronunciation at some point in his career, this name in Cornwall is pronounced to rhyme with "rose"--that is, "Joe's." There is no accent mark in the large "Jose" on the singer's tombstone, but Jose himself used an accent mark when signing his name. His father, Richard Jose senior, was a copper miner who died in late 1876. Jose emigrated to Nevada in search of an uncle after the father's death. Some accounts depict him as a mere boy when he emigrated, a myth Jose himself and later his wife Therese promoted, with Jose's obituary in The Billboard giving the age as eight. However, he was fourteen or possibly older when he emigrated. He never located the uncle but he found a home in Nevada among Cornish miners who welcomed the fellow emigrant. He became an apprentice to a distant uncle who was a Reno blacksmith at Fourth and Sierra streets, William J. Luke. Jose is still called "The Singing Blacksmith" by history buffs in Reno and Virginia City, Nevada. Jose was largely untrained as a singer. Although the singer's wife recalls that Jose's father played the organ and sang in the village church, the only real instruction may have been in Jose's teen years when, according to Arthur Cecil Todd's 1967 book The Cornish Miner in America, one Bishop Whitaker arranged for singing lessons in Reno. Although some sources suggest that Jose's career took off in Sacramento with Charlie Reed's Minstrels, Jose had considerable experience earlier in Reno and elsewhere. A newsreporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal of life in Nevada from 1849 to 1903. The journals were published in three volumes in 1973, and several references to Dick Jose's singing in Nevada show that Doten was an early enthusiast.
Views: 630 Tim Gracyk
North Wales: Feisty and Poetic
 
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Rick Steves' Europe Travel Guide | We get to know North Wales, as we visit the castle-within-a-castle in Conwy, peek into 16th-century domestic life at Plas Mawr, go down deep in the Llechwedd slate mine, and up high in Snowdonia National Park, then stroll through a "Beatle pilgrimage" in Liverpool. © 2006 Rick Steves' Europe
Views: 585847 Rick Steves' Europe
Shawn Mendes "Lost In Japan" (Audio)
 
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Pre-order Shawn Mendes: The Album here now: https://IslandRecs.lnk.to/ShawnMendes Follow Shawn Mendes here: Twitter: https://twitter.com/shawnmendes Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/shawnmendes Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ShawnMendesOfficial
Views: 48078062 Shawn Mendes
The Celts Blood Iron And Sacrifice With Alice Roberts And Neil Oliver - Episode 1 of 3
 
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The 1st episode of the BBC 2 serie "The Celts: Blood, iron and sacrifice"
Views: 324985 Bart Verheyen
Mountain Biking in Cornwall - The iPad Cornwall Guide
 
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http://digital.silverquick.net/cornwallguide.php Videos from the new iPad Cornwall Guide Mountain Biking in Cornwall - A feature article written by Paul Blackburn of Cornwall Roughtracks for the Spring issue of the iPad Cornwall Guide. http://www.facebook.com/pages/Cornwall-Roughtracks/144125285680630
Views: 305 Gordon Burns
THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | GreatestAudioBooks  V1
 
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THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER by Mark Twain - FULL AudioBook | GreatestAudioBooks V1 🌟SPECIAL OFFER🌟► Try Audiobooks.com 🎧 for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 ► Shop for books & gifts: https://www.amazon.com/shop/GreatestAudioBooks (Greatest AudioBooks earns money off of the above affiliate links.) The Adventures of Tom Sawyer (published 1876) is a very well-known and popular story concerning American youth. Mark Twain's lively tale of the scrapes and adventures of boyhood is set in St. Petersburg, Missouri, where Tom Sawyer and his friend Huckleberry Finn have the kinds of adventures many boys can imagine: racing bugs during class, impressing girls, especially Becky Thatcher, with fights and stunts in the schoolyard, getting lost in a cave, and playing pirates on the Mississippi River. One of the most famous incidents in the book describes how Tom persuades his friends to do a boring, hateful chore for him: whitewashing (i.e., painting) a fence. This was the first novel to be written on a typewriter. (summary adapted from wikipedia .org) ► Friend Us On FACEBOOK: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► Follow Us On TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/GAudioBooks ► SUBSCRIBE to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks ► Free 30 day Audible Audiobooks Trial: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE ► BUY T-SHIRTS & MORE: http://bit.ly/1akteBP - READ along by clicking (CC) for Transcript Captions! - LISTEN to this entire audio book reading for free! Chapter listing and length: Chapters 01 to 02 -- 00:26:38 Chapters 03 to 04 -- 00:32:58 Chapters 05 to 06 -- 00:31:51 Chapters 07 to 08 -- 00:21:20 Chapters 09 to 10 -- 00:23:35 Chapters 11 to 12 -- 00:19:01 Chapters 13 to 15 -- 00:35:24 Chapters 16 to 17 -- 00:24:56 Chapters 18 to 20 -- 00:28:55 Chapters 21 to 23 -- 00:31:37 Chapters 24 to 25 -- 00:14:37 Chapter 26 -- 00:15:08 Chapters 27 to 28 -- 00:11:27 Chapter 29 -- 00:14:46 Chapter 30 -- 00:16:59 Chapters 31 to 32 -- 00:23:14 Chapters 33 to 35 -- 00:33:46 #audiobook #audiobooks #freeaudiobooks #greatestaudiobooks #book #books #free #top #best #tomsawyer #fiction #literature #MarkTwain Running Time: (6:46:12) Read by John Greenman This video: Copyright 2012. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved. Audio content is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate with other select companies we earn from qualifying purchases. Your purchases through affiliate links help to generate revenue for this channel. Thank you for your support.
Views: 461386 Greatest AudioBooks
My Study Routine | Veterinary Edition
 
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This is my most requested vet tech video! These are just some tips that personally help me study. I hope this helped you guys and you learned something new! Don't forget to subscribe and become part of the veterinary family! xoxo ✔ V E T E R I N A R Y V L O G S https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLRSnfSqo-l4we6gZK0mqN_tzM92k2FHym ✔ S N A P C H A T vlbirch0429 ✔ I N S T A G R A M https://www.instagram.com/victoriabirch1/ ✔ T W I T T E R https://twitter.com/victoriabirch1 ✔ F A C E B O O K https://www.facebook.com/victoriabirch0429/ ✔ E M A I L [email protected] ✔ WRITE TO ME HERE Victoria Birch P.O. Box 386 Ruston, LA 71273 Disclaimers: 1. A licensed veterinary nurse/technician can only practice underneath a licensed veterinarian 2. A veterinary nurse and a veterinary technician are the same degree 3. Veterinary nurses/technicians aren't allowed to diagnose, prescribe or perform surgery 4. All rules and regulations are different for every state
Views: 14227 Victoria Birch
23. England, Britain, and the World: Economic Development, 1660-1720
 
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Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson discusses the remarkable growth of the British economy in the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. He examines the changed context of stable population and prices; regional agricultural specialization; urbanization; the expansion of overseas trade both with traditional European trading partners and with the Americas and the East; the growth of manufacturing industries which served both domestic and overseas markets, and the intensification of internal trade. He describes and explains the emergence of an increasingly closely articulated national market economy, closely linked to a nascent world economy in which Britain now played a core role. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Economy in the Late Seventeenth and Early Eighteenth Centuries 01:16 - Chapter 2. Economic Growth 08:36 - Chapter 3. Agriculture and Polycentric Urbanism 17:06 - Chapter 4. Commerce 30:46 - Chapter 5. Industrial Agglomeration Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 25657 YaleCourses
Castlerigg Stone Circles, Keswick, Lake District, Britain built by the Khasi or Cassi Part 2
 
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By the time of Julius Caesar’s first invasion of Britain in 55 BC, the Cassi were mining Tin, Gold and Silver not only in Cornwall but all along the coast of Britain. The Cav-Casia or today's Caucasus mountains (Pliny the Elder 's Natural History, 77-79 AD, called them by what the Greeks knew them - Kau-Khasis, the Scythians called the Caucasus - Kroy Khasis) , the Cas-pian sea, the Kassite Kingdom of Babylonia, the Kashi kingdom in Northern India, the holy city of Varanasi was the ancient Khasi city of Kashi, the city of Kashan in ancient Persia around which there was a Kassi tribe, the Catti tribe of Germany, the Casses in France, the ancient Celtic,the Ecossais, Cassi, Picts, Etruscans - all descend from this most ancient Khasi tribe. They were matrilineal & erected Monoliths wherever they lived for a long time. They also wore distinct tartan shawls. Today, the present day Khasis still maintain their Sacred Forests, refuse to sell their lands which have rich uranium deposits in spite of being offered huge bribes, have monoliths all over the Khasi Hills, build awesome Living Root Tree Bridges (MUST SEE), still practise their Khasi herbal traditional medicine, pass their surnames through the mothers, give their inheritance to the youngest daughter, preserve the world's oldest living religion and have a priesthood similar to the ancient Druids. Above all, many specially in the villages live simple but happy lives. Looking at them you would’nt believe that from the Khasi Hills was born some of the greatest civilisations of the world. Just like looking at rural Khmer Cambodians (descendants of the Khasis), you would not imagine that they set up the mighty Khmer Empire and the great, magnificent Angkor Wat visited by millions of tourists annually. Many Khmer words come from the Khasi language. 'Jngai' in Khmer comes from the Khasi word ‘Jngai' meaning 'far away' in English. 'Thmei' in Khmer comes from 'Thmai' or 'Thmei' in Khasi meaning 'New' in English and so on. Many Khasis and Jaintias have become Christians converted by Welsh, Irish, English, Scottish, Germans, Italians, Spanish, French, American and Maltese missionaries. But a significant size of the population remain with their ancient Khasi religion KA NIAM KHASI OR NIAM TRE, the oldest living religion of the world. The origin and ancient migrations of the Khasi people https://www.magzter.com/news/700/1992/122017/dopm0. See the following video on the Root of the Caucasus mountains - Kroy Khasis https://youtu.be/lRMUKTBXbMA The following Map shows how humans migrated. Follow the arrow to see how the Khasis arrived at Khasi Hills 57000 years ago. https://youtu.be/CJdT6QcSbQ0 The name of this British tribal chief descends from proto-Celtic Kassi https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cassivellaunus Lawrence A. Waddell writes below that Kassi or Cassi was the title used by the first Phoenician dynasty. See the images of Cassi / Khasi coins used by early Britons. https://books.google.com/books/about/The_Phoenician_Origin_of_Britons_Scots_a.html?id=WFEoDQAAQBAJ Read on in Part 3
Views: 118 Bah Bah
Government calls toxic spill Mexico's worst modern mining disaster
 
02:23
Mexican government officials confirm that some 40-thousand cubic meters of toxic waste water spilled from a copper mine in early August, contaminating at least two rivers in northern Mexico. It's being called Mexico's worst mining-related environmental disaster in recent history. CCTV's Franc Contreras reports.
Views: 228 CGTN America
Richard Jose "Time and Tide" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904 rare countertenor
 
04:00
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as his very rare "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 13 Tim Gracyk
Richard Jose "Time and Tide" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904 rare countertenor
 
04:00
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as his very rare "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 1435 Tim Gracyk
Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170
 
03:43
Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170. Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in the 1890s, such as "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 39 Tim Gracyk
Baby Boy Names Start with P, Baby Boy Names, Name for Boys, Boy Names, Unique Boy Names, Boys Baby
 
02:24
Welcome to Visit Our Amazon Recommendations : https://amazon.com/shop/bbstore check out our store for more product's information... We're sharing Pregnancy, Maternity, Baby and Kids Products on Amazon Page. Besides, we recommend for Daddy to buy gift for Mummy, Baby or Kids. “As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.” Baby Boy Names Start with P, Baby Boy Names, Name for Boys, Boy Names, Unique Boy Names, Boys Baby MEANING of NAMES - Paco - In Native American, the name Paco means - Eagle.. Other origins for the name Paco include - Native American, American, Spanish.The name Paco is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Pearson - In English, the name Pearson means - son of pierce. Other origins for the name Pearson include - English, Irish.The name Pearson is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Piero - In Italian, the name Piero means - Italian form of Peter rock.. Other origins for the name Piero include - Italian, Greek.The name Piero is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Pablo - In Spanish, the name Pablo means - borrowed.The name Pablo originated as an Spanish name. The name Pablo is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Pierre - In French, the name Pierre means - a rock.The name Pierre originated as an French name. The name Pierre is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Palmer - In English, the name Palmer means - palm bearer, peacemaker.The name Palmer originated as an English name. The name Palmer is a unisex name and can be used for a boy or girl name (male or female). - Park - In Chinese, the name Park means - cypress tree. Other origins for the name Park include - Chinese, English.The name Park is a unisex name and can be used for a boy or girl name (male or female). - Patterson - Scottish and northern English: patronymic from a pet form of Pate, a short form of Patrick. Irish: in Ulster of English or Scottish origin; in County Galway, a surname taken by bearers of Gaelic Ó Caisín 'descendant of the little curly-headed one' (from Gaelic casán), which is usually Anglicized as Cussane. - Patricio - In Spanish, the name Patricio means - patrician, noble form of patrick.The name Patricio originated as an Spanish name. The name Patricio is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Phil - In English, the name Phil means - Fond of horses. Form of Phillip.. Other origins for the name Phil include - English, Greek.The name Phil is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Pete - In English, the name Pete means - A rock. Form of Peter.. Other origins for the name Pete include - English, Greek.The name Pete is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Pancho - In Spanish, the name Pancho means - tuft, plume.The name Pancho originated as an Spanish name. The name Pancho is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Patton - In English, the name Patton means - from the warriors town.The name Patton originated as an English name. The name Patton is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Primo - In Italian, the name Primo means - first born.The name Primo originated as an Italian name. The name Primo is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Preston - In English, the name Preston means - priests town.The name Preston originated as an English name. The name Preston is a unisex name and can be used for a boy or girl name (male or female). - Piran - In Celtic, the name Piran means - St. Piran is the Cornish patron saint of miners..The name Piran originated as an Celtic name. The name Piran is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Potter - In English, the name Potter means - pot maker.The name Potter originated as an English name. The name Potter is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Paulo - In African, the name Paulo means - place of rest.The name Paulo originated as an African name. The name Paulo is most often used as a boy name or male name. - Patrice - In French, the name Patrice means - Noble.. Other origins for the name Patrice include - French, Latin-American.The name Patrice is most often used as a girl name or female name. - Paxton - In Latin-American, the name Paxton means - town of peace. Other origins for the name Paxton include - Latin-American, English.The name Paxton is a unisex name and can be used for a boy or girl name (male or female).
Views: 19331 Baby Names Girls Boys
Rock Art of the Mediterranean Basin on the Iberian  ... (UNESCO/NHK)
 
02:47
The late prehistoric rock-art sites of the Mediterranean seaboard of the Iberian peninsula form an exceptionally large group. Here the way of life during a critical phase of human development is vividly and graphically depicted in paintings whose style and subject matter are unique. Source: UNESCO TV / © NHK Nippon Hoso Kyokai URL: http://whc.unesco.org/en/list/874/
Views: 2084 UNESCO
England & Wales Travel Skills
 
01:15:19
Rick Steves European Travel Talk | In this travel talk, Rick Steves explores the cultural hubs of London, Bath, and York; as well as the rural charms of the Cotswolds and Lake District; the historical thrills of places like Canterbury, Dover, and Warwick; and the rugged beauty of North Wales. Download the PDF handout for this class: http://goo.gl/5N85I7 Subscribe at http://goo.gl/l6qjuS for more new travel talks! (Disclaimer: Any special promotions mentioned are no longer valid.)
Richard Jose sings Paul Dresser hymn "Glory to God" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904
 
03:50
Jose recorded several hymns, which suited his high voice wonderfully. Richard Jose's story reads like a Horatio Alger tale: a penniless boy rises to the top of his profession, enjoying renown and even fortune. His wife Therese (he married Therese Shreve of Carson City, Nevada on July 20, 1898) recalled in an article written for The Pony Express, a publication she edited, that Harry Von Tilzer presented her with "a huge sunburst diamond broach" in gratitude for her husband making a hit of the 1900 song "A Bird In a Gilded Cage." She says Charles K. Harris likewise presented a diamond necklace in gratitude for her husband's help in popularizing "After the Ball." Unfortunately, Therese is given to exaggeration and overstatement, and all her statements should be take with a grain of salt. Jose worked closely with composer Paul Dresser. In his 1944 book They All Had Glamour, Edward Marks lists many Dresser songs popularized by Jose. Therese Jose stated her husband even went into the publishing business with Dresser. Oscar Lewis' history of San Francisco's Palace Hotel, titled Bonanza Inn, tells of an Examiner reporter late for an interview with the famous conductor Walter Damrosch because the reporter had been detained elsewhere by the beauty of Jose singing to the accompaniment of Dresser himself. The reporter was too caught up in the music--"hypnotized," he announced--to be on time. The reporter's first words to the famous Wagnerian conductor were of praise for the beauty of Jose singing Dresser's "A Mother's Grave." The History of Boston Theatre, published in 1908, records that when Jose left a Boston stage after singing on the night of April 5, 1891 (he sang encore after encore), the happy audience rose en masse and likewise left the theatre--despite the fact that several other numbers remained on the program, including the popular Rigoletto quartet. Historian Charles Hamm states in Yesterdays that Jose's instinct for a hit was not perfect. When given the chance in 1892 to introduce Charles Harris' new "After the Ball," Jose at first advised Harris that an earlier tune called "Kiss and Let's Make Up" was superior. Jose was with the Primrose and West Minstrels at that time. He was born in England in the Cornish village Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows Jose as being born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates. Jose's wife cites 1869 in her account of the singer's life in a 1968 edition of The Pony Express though a 1978 edition of the same corrects the year to 1862. The singer's 1941 death certificate cites 1872, off by ten years. Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling and indicates how Jose is pronounced in Cornwall, where it is an ordinary name. Although Victor catalogs give a Spanish pronunciation ("hoh-zay") and the singer evidently adopted this pronunciation at some point in his career, this name in Cornwall is pronounced to rhyme with "rose"--that is, "Joe's." There is no accent mark in the large "Jose" on the singer's tombstone, but Jose himself used an accent mark when signing his name. His father, Richard Jose senior, was a copper miner who died in late 1876. Jose emigrated to Nevada in search of an uncle after the father's death. Some accounts depict him as a mere boy when he emigrated, a myth Jose himself and later his wife Therese promoted, with Jose's obituary in The Billboard giving the age as eight. However, he was fourteen or possibly older when he emigrated. He never located the uncle but he found a home in Nevada among Cornish miners who welcomed the fellow emigrant. He became an apprentice to a distant uncle who was a Reno blacksmith at Fourth and Sierra streets, William J. Luke. Jose is still called "The Singing Blacksmith" by history buffs in Reno and Virginia City, Nevada. Jose was largely untrained as a singer. Although the singer's wife recalls that Jose's father played the organ and sang in the village church, the only real instruction may have been in Jose's teen years when, according to Arthur Cecil Todd's 1967 book The Cornish Miner in America, one Bishop Whitaker arranged for singing lessons in Reno. Although some sources suggest that Jose's career took off in Sacramento with Charlie Reed's Minstrels, Jose had considerable experience earlier in Reno and elsewhere. A newsreporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal of life in Nevada from 1849 to 1903. The journals were published in three volumes in 1973, and several references to Dick Jose's singing in Nevada show that Doten was an early enthusiast.
Views: 44 Tim Gracyk
Inside the Egyptian eco resort made of salt rock
 
03:45
(5 Feb 2017) LEAD-IN: An Egyptian eco-lodge built entirely out of salt rock and mud has been described as the perfect escape from the busy modern world. There's no electricity, phone or WiFi at the Adrere Amellal hotel and the secluded location has even drawn the likes of Prince Charles to stay. STORY-LINE: Set against the imposing cliffs of a desert mesa, the Adrere Amellal hotel is described as one of the most sustainable in the world. It's also one of the most remote - at Jaafar village in the Egyptian desert near the border with Libya. The Siwa oasis is just metres away, bringing life to the area which is brimming with olive and palm trees. The pool uses water from an underground Roman spring and the hotel's earthy buildings are designed to blend in with the surrounding desert and to also offer protection from the searing heat. Staff manager and administrator of Adrere Amellal, Ahmad Mohamad Khalifa says the hotel has a unique history. "The hotel is called Adrere Amellal in Amazighi (Berber language), it means the White Mountain. In Siwa there is no mountain as white as the mountain that the hotel is built around. It's also called Jaafar. It's also called Jaafar after the Sheikh who lived here before anyone. He is still buried here." Aside from the location, the most striking feature of the hotel is that is has no electricity, relying only on solar energy as well as candles, wood burners and oil lamps. The walls and much of the furniture are also crafted out of natural products, including a mixture of mud and salt rock. The bed bases are made of carved pieces of salt rock along with many of the bedside tables. This is the Royal Desert Room which has hosted people like Prince Charles and the Duchess of Cornwall, known for their commitment to the environment and sustainability. "There is no electricity in the hotel, instead candles are used for lighting as well as gas lanterns. Despite this people from all over the world to come and stay in the hotel. From the United States and Europe, from France and Italy," says Khalifa. This is the ultimate destination to escape from the modern world. There is no air conditioning, television, Wi-Fi or phone service here. The hotel has a commitment to sustainability and its restaurants use only organic food which has been grown locally. The hotel is made up of 40 rooms which have been restored from an ancient structure that was built hundreds of years ago. The thick walls are a mixture of mud and rock salt called Kershif which absorbs the heat during the day and also provides good insulation during the cooler nights. The windows provide a shaded and cooling cross breeze from across the Siwa lake oasis. Kershif rocks and salt rocks are found in the old lake in the summer. Salt rock is cut into brick or tile form using a heavy saw. The remnants are then used to form the many candle holders, lamps and other furniture items used in the hotel. Mohamed Ahmad is one of the workers at a local factory that makes products from the local rock. "This workshop has been preparing salt rocks for building the salt hotel in Jaafar since 20 years ago. It has been used for most things to furnish the rooms in the hotel such as nightstands, beds, chandelier, candleholders and bedroom lamps. However we have been using salt rocks for building since forever." One of the area's oldest builders is 83 year old Hamza Hamida who was part of the hotel's construction team. "I helped and constructed most of Shali village and Jaafar village in Siwa. Most of the houses and the salt-hotel, the type of rocks we used was Kershif because it's healthy and comes straight from our environment," he says. With these jobs, a new generation of craftsmen is beginning to emerge. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/194078f39cdbda1cc50d96c8c4ab5be8 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 215 AP Archive
Out of the Fiery Furnace - Episode 1 - From Stone to Bronze
 
58:27
From the Stone Age to the era of the silicon chip — metals and minerals have marked the milestones of our civilization. OUT OF THE FIERY FURNACE traces the story of civilization through the exploitation of metals, minerals and energy resources. Renowned radio and BBC television commentator Michael Charlton hosts seven, one-hour programs filmed in more than 50 different parts of the world. This very unusual public television series combines the disciplines of history, science, archeology and economics in order to explore the relationship between technology and society. How did human beings first come to recognize metals buried in rocks? Michael Charlton visits an archaeological dig at a Stone Age settlement to uncover the ways in which our early ancestors extracted metal from rock. This episode visits several dramatic locations, including India and the Sinai Desert to follow remarkable experiments using the smelting techniques of the ancient civilizations. You'll also travel to Thailand to find a possible answer to a great mystery: how did bronze come to be invented in the Middle East where there are no deposits of a necessary element — tin? (60 minutes) VHS Cover: http://i.imgur.com/RuPFqrt Disclaimer: This video series, produced in 1986 by Opus Films is shown here for Educational Purposes. It includes footage of cultures in India, China, Near East, etc. and ancient methods of manufacturing metals. It is hoped that this information is useful for archival and educational purposes to viewers all across the world. The video is provided here under the Fair Use policy.
29 Min Treadmill Virtual Scenery Prague Czech Republic with Techno Music Mix
 
29:37
For the Full HD download with no watermark version, please visit https://vimeo.com/ondemand/prague Virtual Cycle Prague - Czech Republic Around 120 mins Running or Cycling at 9 mph/15 km/h Prague is the equal of Paris in terms of beauty Prague (Czech: Praha) is the capital and largest city of the Czech Republic. The city's historic buildings and narrow, winding streets are a testament to its centuries-old role as capital of the historic region of Bohemia. Prague lies on the banks of the beautiful, meandering Vltava River that reflects the city's golden spires and 9th-century castle that dominates the skyline. We take you on Virtual Cycle tour with his historic atmosphere of Prague but also bohemian Park with glorious Fall Colours and Scenic Ride on the banks of the beautiful, meandering Vltava River that reflects the city's golden spires and 9th-century castle that dominates the skyline. SUBSCRIBE For Unlimited Streaming for over 230 Videos Of Treadmill Videos and Virtual Walks and Cycle https://vimeo.com/ondemand/fitnessvideostreaming
Views: 3339 World Nature Video
Celebrating 100 Years of Finnish Independence: The History & Future of the Finnish Language
 
02:06:49
In celebration of 100 years of Finnish independence, the Library co-sponsored with the Embassy of Finland a symposium on the history and future of the Finnish language. Speaker Biography: Hilary Virtanen is assistant professor of Finnish and Nordic studies at Finlandia University. Speaker Biography: Daniel Karvonen is senior lecturer in Finnish and linguistics at the University of Minnesota. Speaker Biography: Aili Flint is senior lecturer in Finnish emerita at Columbia University. Speaker Biography: Kirsti Kauppi is the Ambassador of Finland to the United States. For transcript and more information, visit http://www.loc.gov/today/cyberlc/feature_wdesc.php?rec=8145
Views: 2209 LibraryOfCongress
Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170
 
03:40
LYRICS: Why don't they sing the old songs now, the dear old song of yore? The songs we sang in happier days now gone for ever more...Give me a strain of Bonnie Doon..." Richard Jose sings "Dear Old Songs," recorded on January 12, 1904, and issued on Victor 31170. Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded."
Views: 13 Tim Gracyk
Richard Jose sings Paul Dresser hymn "Glory to God" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904
 
03:49
Jose recorded several hymns, which suited his high voice wonderfully. Richard Jose's story reads like a Horatio Alger tale: a penniless boy rises to the top of his profession, enjoying renown and even fortune. His wife Therese (he married Therese Shreve of Carson City, Nevada on July 20, 1898) recalled in an article written for The Pony Express, a publication she edited, that Harry Von Tilzer presented her with "a huge sunburst diamond broach" in gratitude for her husband making a hit of the 1900 song "A Bird In a Gilded Cage." She says Charles K. Harris likewise presented a diamond necklace in gratitude for her husband's help in popularizing "After the Ball." Unfortunately, Therese is given to exaggeration and overstatement, and all her statements should be take with a grain of salt. Jose worked closely with composer Paul Dresser. In his 1944 book They All Had Glamour, Edward Marks lists many Dresser songs popularized by Jose. Therese Jose stated her husband even went into the publishing business with Dresser. Oscar Lewis' history of San Francisco's Palace Hotel, titled Bonanza Inn, tells of an Examiner reporter late for an interview with the famous conductor Walter Damrosch because the reporter had been detained elsewhere by the beauty of Jose singing to the accompaniment of Dresser himself. The reporter was too caught up in the music--"hypnotized," he announced--to be on time. The reporter's first words to the famous Wagnerian conductor were of praise for the beauty of Jose singing Dresser's "A Mother's Grave." The History of Boston Theatre, published in 1908, records that when Jose left a Boston stage after singing on the night of April 5, 1891 (he sang encore after encore), the happy audience rose en masse and likewise left the theatre--despite the fact that several other numbers remained on the program, including the popular Rigoletto quartet. Historian Charles Hamm states in Yesterdays that Jose's instinct for a hit was not perfect. When given the chance in 1892 to introduce Charles Harris' new "After the Ball," Jose at first advised Harris that an earlier tune called "Kiss and Let's Make Up" was superior. Jose was with the Primrose and West Minstrels at that time. He was born in England in the Cornish village Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows Jose as being born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates. Jose's wife cites 1869 in her account of the singer's life in a 1968 edition of The Pony Express though a 1978 edition of the same corrects the year to 1862. The singer's 1941 death certificate cites 1872, off by ten years. Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling and indicates how Jose is pronounced in Cornwall, where it is an ordinary name. Although Victor catalogs give a Spanish pronunciation ("hoh-zay") and the singer evidently adopted this pronunciation at some point in his career, this name in Cornwall is pronounced to rhyme with "rose"--that is, "Joe's." There is no accent mark in the large "Jose" on the singer's tombstone, but Jose himself used an accent mark when signing his name. His father, Richard Jose senior, was a copper miner who died in late 1876. Jose emigrated to Nevada in search of an uncle after the father's death. Some accounts depict him as a mere boy when he emigrated, a myth Jose himself and later his wife Therese promoted, with Jose's obituary in The Billboard giving the age as eight. However, he was fourteen or possibly older when he emigrated. He never located the uncle but he found a home in Nevada among Cornish miners who welcomed the fellow emigrant. He became an apprentice to a distant uncle who was a Reno blacksmith at Fourth and Sierra streets, William J. Luke. Jose is still called "The Singing Blacksmith" by history buffs in Reno and Virginia City, Nevada. Jose was largely untrained as a singer. Although the singer's wife recalls that Jose's father played the organ and sang in the village church, the only real instruction may have been in Jose's teen years when, according to Arthur Cecil Todd's 1967 book The Cornish Miner in America, one Bishop Whitaker arranged for singing lessons in Reno. Although some sources suggest that Jose's career took off in Sacramento with Charlie Reed's Minstrels, Jose had considerable experience earlier in Reno and elsewhere. A newsreporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal of life in Nevada from 1849 to 1903. The journals were published in three volumes in 1973, and several references to Dick Jose's singing in Nevada show that Doten was an early enthusiast.
Views: 23 Tim Gracyk
Peat Loaf at the Glasgow Ferry
 
09:44
My first gig with Peat Loaf in 4 years with just 4 days notice.
Views: 3670 Gina Lawson
12-string Guitar: Trelawny (Including lyrics and chords)
 
02:09
"Trelawny" also known as "Song of the Western Men" was written by Robert Stephen Hawker in 1824. The following information comes from Wikipedia: Hawker wrote the song in 1824, telling of events that took place in 1688. When the song first appeared many thought it to be a contemporary record of events, although in fact the song contains one or two inaccuracies. The march on London described in this song only reached as far as Bristol, before Trelawny was acquitted by a jury in London and released. Many people have erroneously supposed the song to be ancient, among them, Sir Walter Scott, Lord Macaulay, and Charles Dickens.[1] Hawker's version of Trelawny was possibly a rework of an original song that is said "to have resounded in every house, in every highway, and in every street."[2] According to Cornish historian Robert Morton Nance, The Song of the Western Men was possibly inspired by the song Come, all ye jolly tinner boys which was written more than ten years earlier in about 1807, when Napoleon Bonaparte made threats that would affect trade in Cornwall at the time of the invasion of Poland. Ye jolly Tinner boys contains the line "Why forty thousand Cornish boys shall knawa the reason why."[3] The Trelawny in Hawker's song was Jonathan Trelawny (1650--1721), who was one of the seven bishops imprisoned in the Tower of London by James II in 1688. Born at Pelynt into an old Cornish family, his father, the 2nd Baronet of Trelawne, was a supporter of the Royalist cause during the English Civil War. Despite its inaccuracies the song has become the Cornish national anthem and is a regular favourite sung at Cornish rugby union matches and other Cornish gatherings. Also, primary school children in some schools in Cornwall are taught the first verse and chorus, and sing it at events such as Murdoch Day. I am singing it as a request from my friend Ken but also because my maternal great-grandfather was Cornish and came to the Isle of Man in the mid 1800s for the mining. I have had to guess at the chords as I was unable to find any on the internet, and as this is the first time I have attempted to sing this song it may not be absolutely accurate. After all I do not read music and only play and sing 'by ear'. I have just produced an eBook containing 50 songs (first volume hopefully provided it sells) which can be seen and purchased by following this link: http://store.blurb.com/ebooks/316519-50-songs-from-the-threelegsoman-collection
Views: 5700 threelegsoman
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS - FULL AudioBook (by Kenneth Grahame) | Greatest Audio Books V2
 
06:47:45
THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS - FULL AudioBook (by Kenneth Grahame) | Greatest AudioBooks V2 🌟 S P E C I A L O F F E R 🌟 ► try Audiobooks .com 🎧 for FREE! http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 ► S H O P great books & gifts: https://www.amazon.com/shop/GreatestAudioBooks This much-loved story follows a group of animal friends in the English countryside as they pursue adventure ... and as adventure pursues them! The chief characters - Mole, Rat, and Toad - generally lead upbeat and happy lives, but their tales are leavened with moments of terror, homesickness, awe, madcap antics, and derring-do. Although classed as children's literature, The Wind in the Willows holds a gentle fascination for adults too. The vocabulary is decidedly not "Dick and Jane", and a reader with a love of words will find new ones to treasure, even if well-equipped for the journey. Parents will appreciate the themes of loyalty, manners, self-restraint, and comradeship which are evident throughout the book. When the characters err, they are prompt to acknowlege it, and so a reading of this book can model good behavior to children, who will otherwise be enchanted with the many ways in which the lives of these bucolic characters differ from modern life. This book was so successful that it enabled the author to retire from banking and take up a country life somewhat like that of his creations. It has been adapted for screen, stage, and even a ride at the original Disneyland. (Summary by Mark F. Smith) ►F A C E B O O K: http://www.Facebook.com/GreatestAudioBooks ►T W I T T E R : https://www.twitter.com/GAudioBooks ► S U B S C R I B E to Greatest Audio Books: http://www.youtube.com/GreatestAudioBooks 🌟 F R E E 30 day Audible Audiobooks Trial: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE 🌟 B U Y T-SHIRTS & MORE: http://bit.ly/1akteBP 🌟 F R E E Audiobooks .com 🎧 30 day trial: http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 - READ along by clicking (CC) for Closed Caption Transcript! - LISTEN to the entire audiobook for free! Chapter listing and length: 01 - The River Bank -- 00:29:55 02 - The Open Road -- 00:29:35 03 - The Wild Wood -- 00:29:56 04 - Mr. Badger -- 00:30:56 05 - Dolce Dolmum -- 00:38:00 06 - Mr. Toad -- 00:32:15 07 - The Piper at the Gates of Dawn -- 00:27:12 08 - Toad's Adventures -- 00:33:31 09 - Wayfarers All -- 00:43:41 10 - The Further Adventures of Toad -- 00:39:54 11 - 'Like Summer Tempests Came His Tears' -- 00:40:16 12 - The Return of Ulysses -- 00:31:53 #audiobook #audiobooks #freeaudiobooks #greatestaudiobooks V2 Total running time: 6:47:04 Read by Mark F. Smith In addition to the reader, this audio book was produced by: Meta-Coordinator/Cataloging: Annie Coleman Rothenberg This video: Copyright 2013. Greatest Audio Books. All Rights Reserved. Audio content is a Librivox recording. All Librivox recordings are in the public domain. For more information or to volunteer visit librivox.org. Disclaimer: As an Amazon Associate and an affiliate with other select companies we earn from qualifying purchases. Your purchases through affiliate links help to generate revenue for this channel. Thank you for your support.
Views: 154180 Greatest AudioBooks
Virtual Trail Run for Treadmills - 60 minutes - Tunnel Trail Alum Creek
 
59:28
Tunnel trail on the West Side of the Alum Creek Reservoir. On a cold (8 F) snowy day - another words - PERFECT.
Views: 301 Nathaniel Mauger
Cornwall meaning and pronunciation
 
01:03
Quite possibly the greatest place on the planet, this is reflected by British Tourist industry figures. More people from the UK go to Cornwall on holiday then fly abroad. Problem is, we don't want you here. We live in a beautiful place far far away from the North East or any crime-rife cities and we, the Cornish people would like to keep it that way. Nothing pisses me off more than not being able to surf because of the sheer volume of pastey-white bodies on the beach and in the water. Really, stay at home this summer, we'll like you a lot more for it. Cornwall definition by Urban Dictionary
Views: 555 Epic Pronunciations
Richard Jose "Time and Tide" Victor Talking Machine Company 1904 rare countertenor
 
04:02
Richard Jose was first to be identified on records as a "countertenor" though he might not have been the first to make records. Harry Leighton is identified as an "alto" in a mid-1890s cylinder catalog. The terms "alto" and "contra-tenor" were used more often in the 1890s than "counter-tenor." On the cover of sheet music for Monroe R. Rosenfeld's "Remember Your Father and Mother" (1890) is this line: "Written for and sung by America's Most Famous Alto, Mr. Richard José." Most of Jose's discs, including the earliest with Monarch and Deluxe labels (Victor used these words on early ten- and twelve-inch discs, respectively), identify him as "counter-tenor" though on some labels Jose is identified as "tenor." It appears that Jose was billed as a tenor, not a countertenor, in minstrel shows and vaudeville. The origins of the term "countertenor" are not known for certain but it may have referred to a voice part ("against the tenor"). In the earliest organum were contratenor altus (high against the tenor) and contratenor bassus (low against the tenor). Countertenors are sometimes called altos because they originally sang alto parts, alto meaning "high." A countertenor's pitch is similar to the female contralto's. Whereas nearly all modern countertenors rely on falsetto, which is a "head voice" with little or no chest resonance, Jose as well as recording artist Will Oakland achieved an unusually high range without reliance on falsetto, instead using full lung power. Each singer was a naturally high-placed tenor (another was Russell Oberlin, leading American countertenor of the 1950s and 1960s). Jose could color his voice's tone in a way that is difficult for anyone using falsetto. No singer relying on falsetto could have produced the volume needed to fill concert halls, as Jose did. Newspapers at the time insisted that Jose had the voice of a boy, which may have been true in terms of tone. A difference is that Jose could project his voice and be heard throughout an auditorium as no boy soprano could. The countertenor voice was much valued centuries ago (as was the castrato), especially in the 1600s and early 1700s. English composer Henry Purcell was reportedly a countertenor. Such singing went out of fashion for various reasons, and no singers of the nineteenth century won fame as countertenors with the exception of Jose at the end of that century. His recording career was brief, from 1903 to 1906, but he had been popular on stage long before he made records, and he continued to give concerts after his recording career was over. A slim book titled "Silver Threads Among the Gold" in the Life of Richard J. Jose was written and self-published by Grace M. Wilkinson four years after Jose's death. The book's copyright date is February 8, 1945. Only once does Wilkinson refer to Jose as a countertenor: "His popularity in vaudeville as a contra-tenor was very much like that of Caruso in Italian grand opera." Almost nothing is said about Jose's singing techniques, but his range is noted: "Mr. Jose's compass was from D above middle C to E above high C." The book also notes that when he sang "Goodbye, Dolly Gray," Jose's principle "working note was high 'D,' two half?steps above the sacred high 'C' of Italian tenordom." He was born in England in a Cornish village, Lanner. His birth certificate, according to British researcher David Ivall, shows that Jose was born on June 5, 1862. Various sources give later dates but these rely on statements by Jose or his wife, both of whom wished him to seem younger than he was. Wilkinson refers to a home built in Lanner by Captain James Francis and writes, "In this home, all of Captain Francis' children were born. His daughter, Elizabeth...was now being courted by a young Spanish miner, Richard Jose. His ancestors had come from Spain to work in the tin mines at Cornwall." Jose's baptismal record is dated September 17, 1862, and gives the surname as "Joce." This is a phonetic spelling. Richard Jose senior was a copper miner who died in late 1876. The son, eldest of five children, traveled to Nevada to locate an uncle. A reporter from Virginia City, one Alfred Doten, kept a detailed journal, and The Journals of Alfred Doten, 1849-1903, published in three volumes in 1973, refer several times to Dick Jose's early singing career. Doten's journal entries suggest that Jose traveled in summer months. On July 4, 1887, two years after first mentioning Jose, Doten again refers to Jose, calling him "Reno's favorite tenor" and writes, "In response to encores and vociferous calls he sang 'Grandfather's Footsteps' in his clearest, sweetest, most sympathetic voice, and was rapturously applauded." He made brown wax cylinders in 1892, such as his very rare "Poor Blind Boy," which I posted elsewhere on youtube.
Views: 49 Tim Gracyk
VISITING THE SET OF POLDARK
 
07:52
PREVIOUS VLOG - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuKekYFu5Bo LATEST COVER - https://www.youtube.com/sophiinegi 25/06/17 - Somerset, England. Music: @sophiinegus www.sophiinegus.com
Views: 93 Sophii Negus Vlogs
Macquarie Bank February interest rate report – Rates cut to 2.25 per cent
 
02:43
The Reserve Bank of Australia Board held its first meeting for 2015, cutting official interest rates to 2.25%. Watch Martin Lakos, Division Director, Macquarie Private Wealth, discuss the RBA's decision.
Views: 901 Macquarie Group

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