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Into the Greyspine Mines - Critical Role RPG Show: Episode 2
 
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Catch Critical Role live Thursdays at 7PM PT on Twitch: https://goo.gl/D9fsrS Listen to the Critical Role podcast: https://goo.gl/jVwPBr Check out the Geek and Sundry Twitch stream for more, with Critical Role on Thursdays from 7-10pm on http://www.twitch.tv/geekandsundry After Scanlon Shorthalt brought the abomination of a Naga to it’s tortured end, the Vox Machina vowed to Nostoc Greyspine to put an end to the darkness now bubbling up out of the bowls of the earth. The team quickly gears up and makes their way into the mine, and begins a miles long trek down into the veins of Khaloor. After many hours wandering the dark, they reach a subterranean river within a massive, inky cavern where they are are attacked by a pair of umberhulks. The beasts are dispatched without too much difficulty, but in a fit of rage and shortsightedness, Grog charges toward a flickering light further off in the cavern. He stumbles across several Duergar, dark cousins of the dwarves above, as well as a skittering, four legged brain. The wretched thing is killed quickly, but not before lashing out at Grog’s psyche. The goliath’s mind is broken, and he falls to the ground in a heap. Watch all the episodes of Critical Role at:http://geekandsundry.com/shows/critical-role Concept Artwork for 'The Silver Legacy’ movie created by Jessica Mae Stover (jessicastover.com) and Greg Martin (artofgregmartin.com). Visit us on http://geekandsundry.com Subscribe to Geek and Sundry: http://goo.gl/B62jl Join our community at: http://geekandsundry.com/community Twitter: http://twitter.com/geekandsundry Facebook: http://facebook.com/geekandsundry Instagram: http://instagram.com/geekandsundry Google+: https://plus.google.com/+GeekandSundry/ Art by Kit Buss (http://www.anemonetea.com/)
Views: 3424441 Geek & Sundry
Street View's New Look on Google Maps Australia
 
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Check out the new experience of Street View on Google Maps. Learn the new ways to enter Street View, look at our full screen mode, navigate through driving directions, and more. Street View is a feature of Google Maps that allows you to quickly and easily view and navigate high-resolution, 360 degree street level images of various cities in Australia. See at http://maps.google.com.au/streetview
Views: 947014 Google
5. "Countries" and Nation: Social and Economic Networks and the Urban System
 
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Early Modern England: Politics, Religion, and Society under the Tudors and Stuarts (HIST 251) Professor Wrightson discusses local particularism and regionalism in early modern England and highlights the importance of local customs and economic patterns. He then focuses on the manner in which these local areas, while enjoying a measure of cultural, institutional, and economic autonomy, were simultaneously integrated into a larger national whole. The role of trade (both between English regions and with the Continent via the Netherlands), the importance of market towns within the localities as nexuses of social and economic interaction, the place of 'provincial capitals,' and the pivotal position of the metropolis of London are all considered. Throughout the lecture Professor Wrightson also provides details of early modern regional topography and information concerning the role of urban areas in early modern social and economic life. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Countries 11:14 - Chapter 2. Local Markets 22:36 - Chapter 3. Regional and Interregional Patterns of Trade 25:36 - Chapter 4. Trading Systems of National or International Significance 39:30 - Chapter 5. Limitations Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 27576 YaleCourses
Eastbourne
 
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Eastbourne ( pronunciation ) is a large town, seaside resort, and borough in East Sussex, on the south coast of England, 17 miles (27 km) east of Brighton. Eastbourne is located immediately east of Beachy Head, the highest chalk sea cliff in Great Britain and part of the South Downs National Park. With a seafront consisting largely of Victorian hotels, the pier, and a Napoleonic era fort and military museum, Eastbourne was developed by the Duke of Devonshire in 1800 from four separate hamlets. It has a growing population, a broad economic base, and is home to companies in a wide range of industries. Though Eastbourne is a relatively new town, there is evidence of human occupation in the area from the Stone Age. The town grew as a fashionable tourist resort largely thanks to prominent landowner, William Cavendish, later known as the Duke of Devonshire. Cavendish appointed architect Henry Currey to design a street plan for the town, but not before sending him to Europe to draw inspiration. The resulting mix of architecture is typically Victorian and remains a key feature of Eastbourne. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 483 Audiopedia
Radium in the environment | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radium_and_radon_in_the_environment 00:00:55 1 Radium 00:01:04 1.1 In the oil and gas industries 00:01:48 1.2 Radioluminescent products, ie glow in the dark 00:02:09 1.3 In radioactive quackery 00:02:53 2 Radon 00:03:43 2.1 Occurrence 00:05:16 2.2 In air 00:05:58 2.3 In groundwater 00:06:27 2.4 Radon in rainwater 00:07:19 2.5 In the oil and gas industries 00:07:55 2.6 In mines 00:11:51 2.7 In houses Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8600526140056828 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-E "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Radium and radon are important contributors to environmental radioactivity. Radon occurs naturally in the environment as a result of decay of radioactive elements in the soil and it can accumulate in houses built on areas where such decay occurs. This radon is among major causes of cancer, estimated to contribute to about 2% of all cancer related deaths in Europe.Radium, like radon, is a radioactive element and it is found in small quantities in nature and may thus be hazardous to life if concentrated. Radium has its origins as a decay product of certain isotopes of uranium and thorium. Radium may also be released to the environment as a result of human activity, for example, in inproperly discarded products painted with radioluminescent paint.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
'Finding History in Our Own Back Yard' - 3/4/2008
 
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Western Washington University Professor Chris Friday will present "Finding History in Our Own Backyard: Georgia Pacific, Your House, Your Neighborhood and Public History at WWU" from 7 to 8:30 p.m. on Tuesday, March 4, at the Bellingham City Council chambers, Bellingham City Hall, 210 Lottie St. The lecture, which is free and open to the public, is offered as the second event of the annual WWU College of Humanities and Social Sciences Dean's Lecture Series. Writer Maxing Hong Kingston once noted that America and especially the American West was a place devoid of history because it was a "land without ghosts." As true as that may have been from her Chinese American perspective growing up in the 1950s, Kingston missed an opportunity to understand that the landscape around us is filled with many "ghostscapes" - the layered meanings and perspectives we create about places across cultures and times. What happens when we consider our own local, familiar landscape in historical perspective? What happens when we disagree on the meaning of familiar places, especially because we see them through lenses we create out of our own peculiar understandings of history and place? How do Western students, the University, and the community benefit from thinking about the local landscape historically? This lecture will attempt to answer these questions. Friday will also present the Georgia Pacific/Waterfront Oral History project and the current Bellingham Historic Neighborhood project that connect WWU students with the local community in the exploration of history outside the classroom. Chris Friday is a professor of History at Western Washington University. Friday grew up near Mount St. Helens, got his bachelor's degree at Lewis and Clark College in Portland, then received his master's degree and doctorate in American History from UCLA. He lived in China for nearly two years in the early 1980s and taught in the Boston area prior to coming to WWU in 1992. At WWU, Friday's teaching and research/publication areas are Pacific Northwest History, American Indian History, and Asian American History. For most of the last decade, Friday has also been director of the Center for Pacific Northwest Studies at Western Washington University (an archives and small research institute). Most recently, Friday started a Public History minor at WWU, which is designed to help students see the connections between their interest in history as an academic subject and history as a discipline practiced in settings well beyond teaching in any classroom. "The purpose of the Dean's Community Lecture Series is to foster connections between the College of Humanities and Social Sciences and the local community. What better way to make such connections than learning about our city from our own historians, such as Chris Friday," said Ron Kleinknecht, CHSS dean. Friday's presentation will also be taped and rebroadcast on Bellingham BTV 10.
Environmental Justice: A Native American Perspective Webinar
 
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This webinar was originally broadcast on 9/19/2012 and highlights several ongoing issues that Native American tribal groups have mobilized around for many years. The speakers discuss emerging threats, such as climate change, that will affect Native Americans disproportionately. Case studies describe both successful approaches and issues that remain unresolved despite existing efforts to mitigate or prevent harmful environmental exposures.
Views: 3546 NIEHS
History of Western civilization | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of Western civilization Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Western civilization traces its roots back to Europe and the Mediterranean. It is linked to the Roman Empire and with Medieval Western Christendom which emerged from the Middle Ages to experience such transformative episodes as the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Enlightenment, the Industrial Revolution, scientific revolution, and the development of liberal democracy. The civilizations of Classical Greece and Ancient Rome are considered seminal periods in Western history; a few cultural contributions also emerged from the pagan peoples of pre-Christian Europe, such as the Celts and Germans, as well as some significant religious contributions derived from Judaism and Hellenistic Judaism stemming back to Second Temple Judea, Galilee, and the early Jewish diaspora; and some other Middle Eastern influences. Christianity and Roman Catholicism has played a prominent role in the shaping of Western civilization, which throughout most of its history, has been nearly equivalent to Christian culture. (There were Christians outside of the West, such as China, India, Russia, Byzantium and the Middle East). Western civilization has spread to produce the dominant cultures of modern Americas and Oceania, and has had immense global influence in recent centuries in many ways. Following the 5th century Fall of Rome, Western Europe entered the Middle Ages, during which period the Catholic Church filled the power vacuum left in the West by the fall of the Western Roman Empire, while the Eastern Roman Empire (or Byzantine Empire) endured in the East for centuries, becoming a Hellenic Eastern contrast to the Latin West. By the 12th century, Western Europe was experiencing a flowering of art and learning, propelled by the construction of cathedrals and the establishment of medieval universities. Christian unity was shattered by the Reformation from the 16th century. A merchant class grew out of city states, initially in the Italian peninsula (see Italian city-states), and Europe experienced the Renaissance from the 14th to the 17th century, heralding an age of technological and artistic advance and ushering in the Age of Discovery which saw the rise of such global European Empires as those of Spain and Portugal. The Industrial Revolution began in Britain in the 18th century. Under the influence of the Enlightenment, the Age of Revolution emerged from the United States and France as part of the transformation of the West into its industrialised, democratised modern form. The lands of North and South America, South Africa, Australia and New Zealand became first part of European Empires and then home to new Western nations, while Africa and Asia were largely carved up between Western powers. Laboratories of Western democracy were founded in Britain's colonies in Australasia from the mid-19th centuries, while South America largely created new autocracies. In the 20th century, absolute monarchy disappeared from Europe, and despite episodes of Fascism and Communism, by the close of the century, virtually all of Europe was electing its leaders democratically. Most Western nations were heavily involved in the First and Second World Wars and protracted Cold War. World War II saw Fascism defeated in Europe, and the emergence of the United States and Soviet Union as rival global powers and a new "East-West" political contrast. Other than in Russia, the European Empires disintegrated after World War II and civil rights movements and widescale multi-ethnic, multi-faith migrations to Europe, the Americas and Oceania lowered the earlier predominance of ethnic Europeans in Western culture. European nations moved towards greater economic and political co-operation through the European Union. The Cold War ended around 1990 with the collapse of Soviet imposed Communism in Central and Eastern Europe. In the 21st century, the Western World retains significant global economic power and influ ...
Views: 422 wikipedia tts
Mining
 
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Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 261 encyclopediacc
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 60 wikipedia tts
Online Mini-Symposium: Translating Aboriginal Traditions to Employment
 
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What does it mean for an Employment Counsellor assisting a person who is Aboriginal? Through case studies, stories and personal experiences this webinar: - Reviews some commonalities and differences between Aboriginal job seekers; - Discusses Best Practices for employment agencies working closely with ASET (Aboriginal Skills & Employment Training) within BC; - Provides insights regarding Aboriginal employees who also have seasonal and cultural responsibilities in their community; and - Offers stories of the inter-generational effect of residential schools on employment within BC.
Views: 227 CfEEBC
Mining | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:51 1 History 00:02:00 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:18 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:31 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:15 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:23 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:36 1.6 The Americas 00:16:44 1.7 Modern period 00:18:22 2 Mine development and life cycle 00:21:09 3 Mining techniques 00:22:39 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:44 3.2 Underground mining 00:25:16 3.3 Highwall mining 00:27:02 4 Machines 00:28:27 5 Processing 00:31:18 6 Environmental effects 00:35:27 6.1 Waste 00:38:00 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:38:45 7 Mining industry 00:43:04 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:43:54 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:47:59 7.3 World Bank 00:50:07 8 Safety 00:53:52 9 Records 00:56:26 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9838512602070575 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or feasibly created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
United Kingdom | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: United Kingdom Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country lying off the north-western coast of the European mainland. The United Kingdom includes the island of Great Britain, the north-eastern part of the island of Ireland and many smaller islands. Northern Ireland is the only part of the United Kingdom that shares a land border with another sovereign state‍—‌the Republic of Ireland. Apart from this land border, the United Kingdom is surrounded by the Atlantic Ocean, with the North Sea to its east, the English Channel to its south and the Celtic Sea to its south-south-west, giving it the 12th-longest coastline in the world. The Irish Sea lies between Great Britain and Ireland. With an area of 242,500 square kilometres (93,600 sq mi), the United Kingdom is the 78th-largest sovereign state in the world. It is also the 22nd-most populous country, with an estimated 66.0 million inhabitants in 2017. The sovereign state is a constitutional monarchy with a parliamentary democracy. The monarch is Queen Elizabeth II, who has reigned since 1952, making her the longest-serving current head of state. The United Kingdom's capital and largest city is London, a global city and financial centre with an urban area population of 10.3 million. Other major urban areas in the UK include the conurbations centred on Manchester, Birmingham, Leeds, Glasgow and Liverpool. The United Kingdom consists of four countries: England, Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. Their capitals are London, Belfast, Edinburgh, and Cardiff respectively. Apart from England, the countries have devolved administrations, each with varying powers. The nearby Isle of Man, Bailiwick of Guernsey and Bailiwick of Jersey are not part of the UK, being Crown dependencies with the British Government responsible for defence and international representation. The medieval conquest and subsequent annexation of Wales by the Kingdom of England, followed by the union between England and Scotland in 1707 to form the Kingdom of Great Britain, and the union in 1801 of Great Britain with the Kingdom of Ireland created the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. Five-sixths of Ireland seceded from the UK in 1922, leaving the present formulation of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. There are fourteen British Overseas Territories, the remnants of the British Empire which, at its height in the 1920s, encompassed almost a quarter of the world's land mass and was the largest empire in history. British influence can be observed in the language, culture and legal systems of many of its former colonies. The United Kingdom is a developed country and has the world's fifth-largest economy by nominal GDP and ninth-largest economy by purchasing power parity. It has a high-income economy and has a very high Human Development Index, ranking 14th in the world. It was the world's first industrialised country and the world's foremost power during the 19th and early 20th centuries. The United Kingdom remains a great power with considerable economic, cultural, military, scientific and political influence internationally. It is a recognised nuclear weapons state and is sixth in military expenditure in the world. It has been a permanent member of the United Nations Security Council since its first session in 1946. It has been a leading member state of the European Union (EU) and its predecessor, the European Economic Community (EEC), since 1973; however, a referendum in 2016 resulted in 51.9% of UK voters favouring leaving the European Union, and the country's exit is being negotiated. The United Kingdom is also a member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the Council of Europe, the G7, the G20, NATO, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Interpol and the World Trade Organization (WTO).
Views: 100 wikipedia tts
Wales | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Wales Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ In case you don't find one that you were looking for, put a comment. This video uses Google TTS en-US-Standard-D voice. SUMMARY ======= Wales (Welsh: Cymru [ˈkəmri] ( listen)) is a country that is part of the United Kingdom and the island of Great Britain. It is bordered by England to the east, the Irish Sea to the north and west, and the Bristol Channel to the south. It had a population in 2011 of 3,063,456 and has a total area of 20,779 km2 (8,023 sq mi). Wales has over 1,680 miles (2,700 km) of coastline and is largely mountainous, with its higher peaks in the north and central areas, including Snowdon (Yr Wyddfa), its highest summit. The country lies within the north temperate zone and has a changeable, maritime climate. Welsh national identity emerged among the Britons after the Roman withdrawal from Britain in the 5th century, and Wales is regarded as one of the modern Celtic nations. Llywelyn ap Gruffudd's death in 1282 marked the completion of Edward I of England's conquest of Wales, though Owain Glyndŵr briefly restored independence to Wales in the early 15th century. The whole of Wales was annexed by England and incorporated within the English legal system under the Laws in Wales Acts 1535 and 1542. Distinctive Welsh politics developed in the 19th century. Welsh liberalism, exemplified in the early 20th century by Lloyd George, was displaced by the growth of socialism and the Labour Party. Welsh national feeling grew over the century; Plaid Cymru was formed in 1925 and the Welsh Language Society in 1962. Established under the Government of Wales Act 1998, the National Assembly for Wales holds responsibility for a range of devolved policy matters. At the dawn of the Industrial Revolution, development of the mining and metallurgical industries transformed the country from an agricultural society into an industrial nation; the South Wales Coalfield's exploitation caused a rapid expansion of Wales' population. Two-thirds of the population live in South Wales, including Cardiff, Swansea, Newport and the nearby valleys. Now that the country's traditional extractive and heavy industries have gone or are in decline, Wales' economy depends on the public sector, light and service industries and tourism. Although Wales closely shares its political and social history with the rest of Great Britain, and a majority of the population in most areas speaks English as a first language, the country has retained a distinct cultural identity and is officially bilingual. Over 560,000 Welsh language speakers live in Wales, and the language is spoken by a majority of the population in parts of the north and west. From the late 19th century onwards, Wales acquired its popular image as the "land of song", in part due to the eisteddfod tradition. At many international sporting events, such as the FIFA World Cup, Rugby World Cup and the Commonwealth Games, Wales has its own national teams, though at the Olympic Games, Welsh athletes compete as part of a Great Britain team. Rugby union is seen as a symbol of Welsh identity and an expression of national consciousness.
Views: 184 wikipedia tts
National Library of Wales | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Library_of_Wales 00:01:21 1 History 00:03:46 1.1 Buildings 00:06:24 1.2 Wartime sanctuary 00:08:43 1.3 Librarians 00:09:52 2 Library collections 00:12:32 2.1 Manuscripts 00:13:28 2.1.1 Peniarth Manuscripts 00:19:51 2.1.2 Llanstephan Manuscripts 00:20:50 2.1.3 Cwrtmawr Manuscripts 00:21:42 2.1.4 General Manuscript Collection 00:26:12 2.2 Rare books 00:27:28 2.2.1 Sir John Williams Collection 00:30:05 2.2.2 Ty Coch Collection 00:30:49 2.2.3 John Humphreys Davies Bequest 00:32:34 2.2.4 Bourdillon Collection 00:33:29 2.2.5 Incunabula 00:35:45 2.2.6 Sixteenth-century imprints 00:37:08 2.2.7 Private presses 00:38:14 2.2.8 Fine bindings 00:39:40 2.2.9 The Euclid Collection 00:40:42 2.3 Archives 00:42:04 2.3.1 The Welsh Political Archive 00:42:57 2.3.2 Modern Literary Archives 00:45:27 2.3.3 National Screen and Sound Archive 00:45:59 2.3.4 Penrice and Margam Estate Records 00:46:53 2.4 Pictures 00:49:18 2.5 Photographs 00:50:27 2.6 Maps 00:52:28 3 Publications 00:53:31 4 Digital content 00:56:12 4.1 Welsh Journals Online 00:57:00 4.2 Welsh Newspapers Online 00:57:38 5 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The National Library of Wales (Welsh: Llyfrgell Genedlaethol Cymru), Aberystwyth, is the national legal deposit library of Wales and is one of the Welsh Government sponsored bodies. It is the biggest library in Wales, holding over 6.5 million books and periodicals, and the largest collections of archives, portraits, maps and photographic images in Wales. The Library is also home to the national collection of Welsh manuscripts, the National Screen and Sound Archive of Wales, and the most comprehensive collection of paintings and topographical prints in Wales. As the primary research library and archive in Wales and one of the largest research libraries in the United Kingdom, the National Library is a member of Research Libraries UK (RLUK) and the Consortium of European Research Libraries (CERL).At the very core of the National Library of Wales is the mission to collect and preserve materials related to Wales and Welsh life and those which can be utilised by the people of Wales for study and research. Welsh is the Library's main medium of communication but it does, however, aim to deliver all public services in Welsh and English. In January 2015 the Library in partnership with Wikimedia UK appointed a full-time Wikipedian in Residence with the aim of developing further its resources on an open licence, to a worldwide audience.
Views: 25 wikipedia tts
espyconnect NDIS Support Item modification 2017
 
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we have made some changes to our NDIS Support Items category. Watch our video to see how easy it is to update your listing!
Views: 10913 Espy Connect
The Secret of the Silver Car by Wyndham Martyn
 
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Before he went to join the Armed Forces in World War I France, Anthony Trent had a successfull secret 'career' as a master criminal in the USA, never caught by the police. The war has just ended - but now Anthony Trent seriously fears exposure. While in the trenches, an explosion buried him alive, along with an English soldier. Thinking they would never get out alive, Anthony revealed his identity to the other soldier - just before they were rescued and separated. After recovering from his injuries, all Anthony can think about is finding the English soldier - to thank him for saving his life, but also to know whether the man will betray his big secret. His search is full of adventures, including espionage, blackmail and love. Chapter 1. The Puzzling Passenger - 00:00 Chapter 2. The Man in the Dark - 19:48 Chapter 3. The Beginning of the Search - 36:49 Chapter 4. A Lady Interrupts - 1:33:56 Chapter 5. The Man who Denied - 1:58:37 Chapter 6. Fresh Fields - 2:30:04 Chapter 7. The Sentence of Banishment - 2:56:54 Chapter 8. Count Michael Temesvar - 3:17:58 Chapter 9. Pauline - 3:37:11 Chapter 10. The Greater Game - 4:19:32 Chapter 11. Anthony Plays His Hand - 4:37:12 Chapter 12. Saint Anthony - 5:18:40 Chapter 13. Down to the Sea - 5:51:26 Chapter 14. The Cabinet Meeting - 6:36:15 Chapter 15. Anthony the Triumphant - 6:52:12 This is preceded by "Anthony Trent, Master Criminal": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BCbt81C-Z8o
Views: 2064 Audiobooks Unleashed
Auburn Coach Wife Kristi Malzahn Agrees with Match & eHarmony: Men are Jerks
 
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My advice is this: Settle! That's right. Don't worry about passion or intense connection. Don't nix a guy based on his annoying habit of yelling "Bravo!" in movie theaters. Overlook his halitosis or abysmal sense of aesthetics. Because if you want to have the infrastructure in place to have a family, settling is the way to go. Based on my observations, in fact, settling will probably make you happier in the long run, since many of those who marry with great expectations become more disillusioned with each passing year. (It's hard to maintain that level of zing when the conversation morphs into discussions about who's changing the diapers or balancing the checkbook.) Obviously, I wasn't always an advocate of settling. In fact, it took not settling to make me realize that settling is the better option, and even though settling is a rampant phenomenon, talking about it in a positive light makes people profoundly uncomfortable. Whenever I make the case for settling, people look at me with creased brows of disapproval or frowns of disappointment, the way a child might look at an older sibling who just informed her that Jerry's Kids aren't going to walk, even if you send them money. It's not only politically incorrect to get behind settling, it's downright un-American. Our culture tells us to keep our eyes on the prize (while our mothers, who know better, tell us not to be so picky), and the theme of holding out for true love (whatever that is—look at the divorce rate) permeates our collective mentality. Even situation comedies, starting in the 1970s with The Mary Tyler Moore Show and going all the way to Friends, feature endearing single women in the dating trenches, and there's supposed to be something romantic and even heroic about their search for true love. Of course, the crucial difference is that, whereas the earlier series begins after Mary has been jilted by her fiancé, the more modern-day Friends opens as Rachel Green leaves her nice-guy orthodontist fiancé at the altar simply because she isn't feeling it. But either way, in episode after episode, as both women continue to be unlucky in love, settling starts to look pretty darn appealing. Mary is supposed to be contentedly independent and fulfilled by her newsroom family, but in fact her life seems lonely. Are we to assume that at the end of the series, Mary, by then in her late 30s, found her soul mate after the lights in the newsroom went out and her work family was disbanded? If her experience was anything like mine or that of my single friends, it's unlikely. And while Rachel and her supposed soul mate, Ross, finally get together (for the umpteenth time) in the finale of Friends, do we feel confident that she'll be happier with Ross than she would have been had she settled down with Barry, the orthodontist, 10 years earlier? She and Ross have passion but have never had long-term stability, and the fireworks she experiences with him but not with Barry might actually turn out to be a liability, given how many times their relationship has already gone up in flames. It's equally questionable whether Sex and the City's Carrie Bradshaw, who cheated on her kindhearted and generous boyfriend, Aidan, only to end up with the more exciting but self-absorbed Mr. Big, will be better off in the framework of marriage and family. (Some time after the breakup, when Carrie ran into Aidan on the street, he was carrying his infant in a Baby Björn. Can anyone imagine Mr. Big walking around with a Björn?)
Views: 208968 Shari Wing
Derby
 
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Derby (/ˈdɑrbi/ DAR-bi) is a city and unitary authority area in the East Midlands region of England. It lies upon the banks of the River Derwent and is located in the south of the ceremonial county of Derbyshire, of which it was traditionally the county town. In the 2011 census, the city had a population of 248,700. As home to Lombe's Mill, the first factory in the world, Derby is considered a birthplace of the Industrial Revolution. With the arrival of the railways in the 19th century, and due to its strategic central location, the city grew to become a foremost centre of the British rail industry. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 352 Audiopedia
Industrial archaeology | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Industrial_archaeology 00:02:19 1 IA topics and sites 00:03:47 2 History of industrial archaeology 00:03:57 2.1 Early developments 00:06:12 2.2 Beginnings of the IA movement 00:10:21 2.3 1970s-1980s 00:13:26 2.4 Since 1990 00:15:52 3 IA organizations 00:16:43 4 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9077225279146373 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Industrial archaeology (IA) is the systematic study of material evidence associated with the industrial past. This evidence, collectively referred to as industrial heritage, includes buildings, machinery, artifacts, sites, infrastructure, documents and other items associated with the production, manufacture, extraction, transport or construction of a product or range of products. The field of industrial archaeology incorporates a range of disciplines including archaeology, architecture, construction, engineering, historic preservation, museology, technology, urban planning and other specialties, in order to piece together the history of past industrial activities. The scientific interpretation of material evidence is often necessary, as the written record of many industrial techniques is often incomplete or nonexistent. Industrial archaeology includes both the examination of standing structures and sites that must be studied by an excavation.The field of industrial archaeology developed during the 1950s in Great Britain, at a time when many historic industrial sites and artifacts were being lost throughout that country, including the notable case of Euston Arch in London. In the 1960s and 1970s, with the rise of national cultural heritage movements, industrial archaeology grew as a distinct form of archaeology, with a strong emphasis on preservation, first in Great Britain, and later in the United States and other parts of the world. During this period, the first organized national industrial heritage inventories were begun, including the Industrial Monuments Survey in England and the Historic American Engineering Record in the United States. Additionally, a number of regional and national IA organizations were established, including the North American-based Society for Industrial Archeology in 1971, and the British-based Association for Industrial Archaeology in 1973. That same year, the First International Conference on the Conservation of Industrial Monuments was held at Ironbridge in Shropshire. This conference led, in 1978, to the formal establishment of The International Committee for the Conservation of the Industrial Heritage (commonly known as "TICCIH") as a worldwide organization for the promotion of industrial heritage. The members of these and other IA groups are generally a diverse mix of professionals and amateurs who share a common interest in promoting the study, appreciation and preservation of industrial heritage resources.
Views: 7 wikipedia tts
Timeline of women in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Timeline_of_women_in_science 00:00:46 1 Ancient history 00:02:15 2 Middle Ages 00:04:05 3 16th century 00:05:21 4 17th century 00:08:32 5 18th century 00:15:16 6 Early 19th century 00:20:49 7 Late 19th century 00:30:49 8 Early 20th century 00:30:59 8.1 1900s 00:36:28 8.2 1910s 00:41:27 8.3 1920s 00:44:41 8.4 1930s 00:48:44 8.5 1940s 00:52:58 9 Late 20th century 00:53:09 9.1 1950s 00:58:32 9.2 1960s 01:03:35 9.3 1970s 01:07:35 9.4 1980s 01:10:29 9.5 1990s 01:13:56 10 21st century 01:24:14 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7983986663362643 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This is a timeline of women in science, spanning from ancient history up to the 21st century. While the timeline primarily focuses on women involved with natural sciences such as astronomy, biology, chemistry and physics, it also includes women from the social sciences (e.g. sociology, psychology) and the formal sciences (e.g. mathematics, computer science), as well as notable science educators and medical scientists. The chronological events listed in the timeline relate to both scientific achievements and gender equality within the sciences.
Views: 99 wikipedia tts