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12. Network Security
 
01:18:26
MIT 6.858 Computer Systems Security, Fall 2014 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-858F14 Instructor: Nickolai Zeldovich In this lecture, Professor Zeldovich discusses network security, and how TCP/IP has evolved. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 52025 MIT OpenCourseWare
How Google Protects Your Data at Rest and in Transit (Cloud Next '18)
 
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In this breakout, attendees will learn how their data is protected at rest and in transit on Google Cloud. We'll discuss how data is protected from the user to Google and within Google's infrastructure between services, at which network layers these protections are applied, and when these protections are in place. We'll also cover options for additional protections on Google Cloud, including IPsec tunnels, Gmail S/MIME, and Istio; as well as efforts by Google to increase encryption in transit at large. Event schedule → http://g.co/next18 Watch more Security sessions here → http://bit.ly/2zJTZml Next ‘18 All Sessions playlist → http://bit.ly/Allsessions Subscribe to the Google Cloud channel! → http://bit.ly/NextSub
ROUNDTABLE :   CLIF HIGH, PALADIN & KERRY : CRYPTO CURRENCIES & THE FUTURE
 
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I talk with Clif High and Paladin about Crypto Currencies and the Future. CLIF HIGH is the originator of the Webbot system now focusing on crypto currencies. The web bot project has continued to give archetype descriptors of future events such as the anthrax attack in Washington, the crash of American 587, the Columbia disaster, the Northeast Power outage, the Banda Aceh earthquake and most recently the flooding of the Red River. As a continuing project, reports are offered from the extracted archetype information at his web site, http://halfpasthuman.com ALADIN is a forensic financial investigator, a licensed Private Investigator and assisted with in the OJ Simpson trial investigation. He is a key member of a group called The White Hats. whitehatsreport.com/ KERRY CASSIDY PROJECT CAMELOT http://projectcamelot.tv
Views: 56062 Project Camelot
The Ethics and Governance of AI opening event, February 3, 2018
 
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Chapter 1: 0:04 - Joi Ito Chapter 2: 1:03:27 - Jonathan Zittrain Chapter 3: 2:32:59 - Panel 1: Joi Ito moderates a panel with Pratik Shah, Karthik Dinakar, and Vikash Mansinghka Chapter 4: 3:19:13 - Panel 2: Joi Ito moderades a panel with Kade Crockford (ACLU), Chris Bavitz (), and Adam Foss() discuss the implications of AI for social and criminal justice. More information at: https://www.media.mit.edu/courses/the-ethics-and-governance-of-artificial-intelligence/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 4649 MIT Media Lab
Virtual Session: Blockchain Security: An Improvement or a Nightmare?
 
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David Huseby, Security Maven, Linux Foundation Hyperledger Marta Piekarska, Director of Ecosystem, Linux Foundation Blockchain, the distributed ledger technology (DLT) underlying bitcoin, is far more valuable than the currency it supports. As enterprises start to put distributed ledger technology into practice, it’s important to understand the security implications. Blockchain can both enhance security but also when built into traditional solutions requires traditional security measures. In this RSAC Virtual Session from Linux Foundation’s David Huseby and Marta Piekarska, we’ll look at public vs. private blockchains and lessons learned for enterprises moving to DLTs. We'll walk through real life deployments of Blockchain solutions for an understanding of how Blockchain does, and does not, change the security requirements for your enterprise. https://www.rsaconference.com/videos/virtual-session-blockchain-security
Views: 371 RSA Conference
DEF CON 24 - CINCVolFLT, AK3R303 -  NG911: The Next Gen of Emergency Ph0nage
 
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For 48 years, 9-1-1 has been /the/ emergency telephone number in the United States. It’s also been mired in 48-year-old technology. So let’s just put that on the internet, right? What could possibly go wrong? Without the radical segmentation of the PSTN, the move to IP networks (even the private, managed kind) will bring new 9-1-1 capabilities AND new vulnerabilities. This talk builds on the work of quad, r3plicant, and Peter Hefley (see &lquo;Hacking 911: Adventures in Destruction, Disruption, and Death,&rquo; DEF CON 22, http://ow.ly/10AvZh). It provides an overview of NG9-1-1 architecture and security concerns, and identifies critical attack surfaces that Public Safety Answering Points need to monitor and secure. Familiarity with NENA’si3 and NG-SEC standards may be helpful, but is not required. Bio: CINCVolFLT (Trey Forgety) is Director of Government Affairs for NENA: The 9-1-1 Association. He previously served as a Presidential Management Fellow in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security’s Office of Emergency Communications, with rotations in the Federal Communications Commission’s Public Safety and Homeland Security Bureau, and the U.S. Department of Commerce’s National Telecommunications and Information Administration. A sometimes-piratical sailor and inveterate tinkerer, CINCVolFLT’s recent activities have included work on establishing a backup timing source for telecom networks to ensure service during GPS outages or jamming, and serving as pro bono counsel to QueerCon.He holds a B.S. in Applied Physics and a J.D., both from the University of Tennessee (GO VOLS!). AK3R303 (Alex Kremlin) is Managing Partner and CTO of SecureSet, which is a cybersecurity services provider specializing in education and startup acceleration. Previously, AK3R303 was a Technology Strategist with the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and a Guest Researcher at the National Institute of Standards and Technology focusing on public safety and mobile communications network security. He holds a B.A. from Fordham University where he studied nuclear game theory through the political science department in Beijing, China. He holds an M.A. in National Security & Strategic Studies from the US Naval War College, and is an M.S. / Ph.D. candidate at the CU Boulder College of Engineering & Applied Sciences in Telecom Engineering.
Views: 1469 DEFCONConference
The Legal and Regulatory Environment of Cryptocurrencies
 
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On February 5, the Richard Paul Richman Center for Business, Law, and Public Policy hosted Regulating Cryptocurrencies: The Future of Bitcoin, Ether, and Other Tokens. The discussion brought together Columbia's own fintech expert R.A. Farrokhnia; Commissioner Brian Quintenz of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC); as well as Gary DeWaal and Lee Schneider, leading legal experts on blockchain at ‎Katten Muchin Rosenman LLP and McDermott Will & Emery, respectively. In this video, 2 of 3, Brian Quintenz, Lee Schneider, and Gary DeWaal discuss pressing issues facing users, regulators, and gatekeepers of cryptocurrencies. For more content from the Richman Center, visit https://www8.gsb.columbia.edu/richman/
Adventures in SCADA
 
01:00:23
Speakers: Sergey Bratus (Dartmouth College) and Edmond Rogers (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign). Both are associated with the Trustworthy Cyber Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIP-G, http://tcipg.org) project. Date:  April 30, 2011 Event: TROOPERS 2011, http://troopers.de, the IT-Security conference at Heidelberg, Germany (the URL is important) Sponsors: ERNW (http://ernw.de) Two-line abstract: We describe what a real-world large power company's   SCADA/control network looks like, what it takes to fuzz-test   real-world SCADA equipment, and why such testing is useful to the   asset owners and operators, and will be even more useful in the future.
Views: 4721 Dartmouth
How we earn Lite coin with faucet hub site easily
 
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Plz like and share Website link=https://goo.gl/RN17mo Bitcoin is a new currency that was created in 2009 by an unknown person using the alias Satoshi Nakamoto. Transactions are made with no middle men – meaning, no banks! There are no transaction fees and no need to give your real name.A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency ) is a controversial [1][2] digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses strong cryptography to secure financial transactions, control the creation of additional units, and verify the transfer of assets. [3][4][5] Cryptocurrency is a kind of digital currency , virtual currency or alternative currency . Cryptocurrencies use decentralized control[6] as opposed to centralized electronic money and central banking systems. [7] The decentralized control of each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain , that serves as a public financial transaction database. [8][9] Bitcoin , first released as open-source software in 2009, is generally considered the first decentralized cryptocurrency. [10] Since then, over 4,000 altcoin ( alternative coin ) variants of bitcoin have been created. [11][12][13][14] Formal definition According to Jan Lansky, a cryptocurrency is a system that meets six conditions: [15] 1. The system does not require a central authority, distributed achieve consensus on its state [ sic ]. 2. The system keeps an overview of cryptocurrency units and their ownership. 3. The system defines whether new cryptocurrency units can be created. If new cryptocurrency units can be created, the system defines the circumstances of their origin and how to determine the ownership of these new units. 4. Ownership of cryptocurrency units can be proved exclusively cryptographically . 5. The system allows transactions to be performed in which ownership of the cryptographic units is changed. A transaction statement can only be issued by an entity proving the current ownership of these units. 6. If two different instructions for changing the ownership of the same cryptographic units are simultaneously entered, the system performs at most one of them. In March 2018, the word " cryptocurrency " was added to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. [16] Overview Decentralized cryptocurrency is produced by the entire cryptocurrency system collectively, at a rate which is defined when the system is created and which is publicly known. In centralized banking and economic systems such as the Federal Reserve System , corporate boards or governments control the supply of currency by printing units of fiat money or demanding additions to digital banking ledgers. In case of decentralized cryptocurrency, companies or governments cannot produce new units, and have not so far provided backing for other firms, banks or corporate entities which hold asset value measured in it. The underlying technical system upon which decentralized cryptocurrencies are based was created by the group or individual known as Satoshi Nakamoto. [17] As of May 2018, over 1,800 cryptocurrency specifications existed. [14] Within a cryptocurrency system, the safety, integrity and balance of ledgers is maintained by a community of mutually distrustful parties referred to as miners : who use their computers to help validate and timestamp transactions, adding them to the ledger in accordance with a particular timestamping scheme. [18] Most cryptocurrencies are designed to gradually decrease production of that currency, placing a cap on the total amount of that currency that will ever be in circulation. [19] Compared with ordinary currencies held by financial institutions or kept as cash on hand, cryptocurrencies can be more difficult for seizure by law enforcement. [3] This difficulty is derived from leveraging cryptographic technologies. Architecture Blockchain Main article: Blockchain The validity of each cryptocurrency's coins is provided by a blockchain . A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records , called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography . [17][20] Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block, [20] a timestamp and transaction data. [21] By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. It is "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way". [22] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority. Blockchains are secure by design and are an example of a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault tolerance . Decentralized consensus has therefore been achieved with a blockchain. [23] It solves the double spending problem without the need of aA
Views: 17 7 Minutes Craft
What's new in Android security (Google I/O '18)
 
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Attend this session to learn about security features in Android and how they affect your apps. It will cover new APIs and best practices for protecting the integrity of your app and the privacy of your data. Rate this session by signing-in on the I/O website here → https://goo.gl/wH2uSq Watch more Android sessions from I/O '18 here → https://goo.gl/R9L42F See all the sessions from Google I/O '18 here → https://goo.gl/q1Tr8x Subscribe to the Android Developers channel → http://goo.gl/GEh1ds #io18
Views: 14290 Android Developers
Vint Cerf: past, present, and future of the internet: GCPPodcast 100
 
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Original post: https://www.gcppodcast.com/post/episode-100-vint-cerf/ Google, the Cloud, or podcasts would not exist without the internet, so it’s with an incredible honor that we celebrate our 100th episode with one of its creators: Vint Cerf. Listen to Mark and Francesc talk about the origins, current trends, and the future of the internet with one of the best people to cover the topic.
2010 Google Faculty Summit: Cloud Computing and Software Security
 
40:23
Google Faulty Summit 2010 July 29, 2010 ABSTRACT Presented by Ulfar Erlingsson, Manager, Security Research. Software-as-a-service can provide great benefits, such as ubiquitous, reliable access to data, but cloud computing also raises new challenges and opportunities for computer security. Large-scale Web services must address both traditional security concerns, such as user authentication and key management, as well as newer issues like those raised by the need to maintain users' privacy. At the same time, cloud computing has innate security advantages, such as its use of easily updated and malleable software, which enables instrumentation ranging from individual specialization to large-scale execution summarization. This talk will briefly outline some of these issues and potential research topics in cloud security, with examples from Google's past and current technology efforts used to give context.
Views: 9724 GoogleTechTalks
Free Thoughts, Ep. 212: Your World on the Blockchain (with Brock Cusick)
 
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Brock Cusick joins us this week to talk about the decentralized blockchain technology that bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies run on, and about bitcoin itself: how does bitcoin work? What makes it valuable? Why is there a finite amount of bitcoin? What happens when all of the bitcoin is mined? What’s next for cryptocurrencies and blockchain technology? Will the government step in to regulate this? Can it? Show Notes and Further Reading Back in 2014 we invited Timothy Lee on the show to give us a primer on bitcoin: https://www.libertarianism.org/media/free-thoughts-podcast/is-bitcoin-future-money Download the .mp3 of this episode: http://bit.ly/2Ap7S4K Subscribe through iTunes: https://bitly.com/18wswtX Subscribe through Google Play Music: http://bit.ly/1VLM4sh Free Thoughts RSS feed: http://bit.ly/1q2vZQP
Views: 365 Libertarianism.org
How we earn Black coin with faucet hub site
 
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Website link=https://goo.gl/oGfLM9 A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency ) is a controversial [1][2] digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses strong cryptography to secure financial transactions, control the creation of additional units, and verify the transfer of assets. [3][4][5] Cryptocurrency is a kind of digital currency , virtual currency or alternative currency . Cryptocurrencies use decentralized control[6] as opposed to centralized electronic money and central banking systems. [7] The decentralized control of each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain , that serves as a public financial transaction database. [8][9] Bitcoin , first released as open-source software in 2009, is generally considered the first decentralized cryptocurrency. [10] Since then, over 4,000 altcoin ( alternative coin ) variants of bitcoin have been created. [11][12][13][14] Formal definition According to Jan Lansky, a cryptocurrency is a system that meets six conditions: [15] 1. The system does not require a central authority, distributed achieve consensus on its state [ sic ]. 2. The system keeps an overview of cryptocurrency units and their ownership. 3. The system defines whether new cryptocurrency units can be created. If new cryptocurrency units can be created, the system defines the circumstances of their origin and how to determine the ownership of these new units. 4. Ownership of cryptocurrency units can be proved exclusively cryptographically . 5. The system allows transactions to be performed in which ownership of the cryptographic units is changed. A transaction statement can only be issued by an entity proving the current ownership of these units. 6. If two different instructions for changing the ownership of the same cryptographic units are simultaneously entered, the system performs at most one of them. In March 2018, the word " cryptocurrency " was added to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. [16] Overview Decentralized cryptocurrency is produced by the entire cryptocurrency system collectively, at a rate which is defined when the system is created and which is publicly known. In centralized banking and economic systems such as the Federal Reserve System , corporate boards or governments control the supply of currency by printing units of fiat money or demanding additions to digital banking ledgers. In case of decentralized cryptocurrency, companies or governments cannot produce new units, and have not so far provided backing for other firms, banks or corporate entities which hold asset value measured in it. The underlying technical system upon which decentralized cryptocurrencies are based was created by the group or individual known as Satoshi Nakamoto. [17] As of May 2018, over 1,800 cryptocurrency specifications existed. [14] Within a cryptocurrency system, the safety, integrity and balance of ledgers is maintained by a community of mutually distrustful parties referred to as miners : who use their computers to help validate and timestamp transactions, adding them to the ledger in accordance with a particular timestamping scheme. [18] Most cryptocurrencies are designed to gradually decrease production of that currency, placing a cap on the total amount of that currency that will ever be in circulation. [19] Compared with ordinary currencies held by financial institutions or kept as cash on hand, cryptocurrencies can be more difficult for seizure by law enforcement. [3] This difficulty is derived from leveraging cryptographic technologies. Architecture Blockchain Main article: Blockchain The validity of each cryptocurrency's coins is provided by a blockchain . A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records , called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography . [17][20] Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block, [20] a timestamp and transaction data. [21] By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. It is "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way". [22] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority. Blockchains are secure by design and are an example of a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault tolerance . Decentralized consensus has therefore been achieved with a blockchain. [23] It solves the double spending problem without the need of a trusted authority or central server . The block time is the average time it takes for the network to generate one extra block in the blockchain. [24] Some blockchains create a new block as frequently as every five seconds. [25] By the time of block com
Views: 22 7 Minutes Craft
How we earn Doge coin with faucethub site
 
05:05
Plz like and share Website link=https://goo.gl/io6UPG DEFINITION of 'Dogecoin' Dogecoin is a peer-to-peer open source cryptocurrency and falls under the category of altcoins. Launched in December 2013 with a Shibu Inus (Japanese dog) as its logo, Dogecoin looked casual in its approach but is gaining wide acceptance for online transactions.A cryptocurrency (or crypto currency ) is a controversial [1][2] digital asset designed to work as a medium of exchange that uses strong cryptography to secure financial transactions, control the creation of additional units, and verify the transfer of assets. [3][4][5] Cryptocurrency is a kind of digital currency , virtual currency or alternative currency . Cryptocurrencies use decentralized control[6] as opposed to centralized electronic money and central banking systems. [7] The decentralized control of each cryptocurrency works through distributed ledger technology, typically a blockchain , that serves as a public financial transaction database. [8][9] Bitcoin , first released as open-source software in 2009, is generally considered the first decentralized cryptocurrency. [10] Since then, over 4,000 altcoin ( alternative coin ) variants of bitcoin have been created. [11][12][13][14] Formal definition According to Jan Lansky, a cryptocurrency is a system that meets six conditions: [15] 1. The system does not require a central authority, distributed achieve consensus on its state [ sic ]. 2. The system keeps an overview of cryptocurrency units and their ownership. 3. The system defines whether new cryptocurrency units can be created. If new cryptocurrency units can be created, the system defines the circumstances of their origin and how to determine the ownership of these new units. 4. Ownership of cryptocurrency units can be proved exclusively cryptographically . 5. The system allows transactions to be performed in which ownership of the cryptographic units is changed. A transaction statement can only be issued by an entity proving the current ownership of these units. 6. If two different instructions for changing the ownership of the same cryptographic units are simultaneously entered, the system performs at most one of them. In March 2018, the word " cryptocurrency " was added to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary. [16] Overview Decentralized cryptocurrency is produced by the entire cryptocurrency system collectively, at a rate which is defined when the system is created and which is publicly known. In centralized banking and economic systems such as the Federal Reserve System , corporate boards or governments control the supply of currency by printing units of fiat money or demanding additions to digital banking ledgers. In case of decentralized cryptocurrency, companies or governments cannot produce new units, and have not so far provided backing for other firms, banks or corporate entities which hold asset value measured in it. The underlying technical system upon which decentralized cryptocurrencies are based was created by the group or individual known as Satoshi Nakamoto. [17] As of May 2018, over 1,800 cryptocurrency specifications existed. [14] Within a cryptocurrency system, the safety, integrity and balance of ledgers is maintained by a community of mutually distrustful parties referred to as miners : who use their computers to help validate and timestamp transactions, adding them to the ledger in accordance with a particular timestamping scheme. [18] Most cryptocurrencies are designed to gradually decrease production of that currency, placing a cap on the total amount of that currency that will ever be in circulation. [19] Compared with ordinary currencies held by financial institutions or kept as cash on hand, cryptocurrencies can be more difficult for seizure by law enforcement. [3] This difficulty is derived from leveraging cryptographic technologies. Architecture Blockchain Main article: Blockchain The validity of each cryptocurrency's coins is provided by a blockchain . A blockchain is a continuously growing list of records , called blocks, which are linked and secured using cryptography . [17][20] Each block typically contains a hash pointer as a link to a previous block, [20] a timestamp and transaction data. [21] By design, blockchains are inherently resistant to modification of the data. It is "an open, distributed ledger that can record transactions between two parties efficiently and in a verifiable and permanent way". [22] For use as a distributed ledger, a blockchain is typically managed by a peer-to-peer network collectively adhering to a protocol for validating new blocks. Once recorded, the data in any given block cannot be altered retroactively without the alteration of all subsequent blocks, which requires collusion of the network majority. Blockchains are secure by design and are an example of a distributed computing system with high Byzantine fault tolerance . Decentralized consensus has therefore been achieved with a blockchain. [23] It sol
Views: 17 7 Minutes Craft
Cyber Security Webinar: Production or Patching? Mature companies choose both
 
56:33
Cyber Security is an evolving threat. Recent examples of Cyber Security threats disrupting business operations and corporate reputations have renewed the need to explore updated best practices. Presented by Chris Hamilton, Director – Industrial IT/OT and Cyber Security at Grantek, this webinar provides an opportunity to learn how to safeguard your processes and procedures. Topics will include: - Secure vendor remote access - OEM remote support - Industrial cyber security - Ransomware - Cryptoworm - Critical infrastructure threats - Nation state threats - ISA-62443 - ISA-99 - NIST Manufacturing - Converged Plat-wide Ethernet (CPwE) About Chris Hamilton: Chris started his professional career in web design, databases, and server management with a focus in security at every level, but grew up around process flow and P&IDs in Biochemical Pharmaceuticals. In his roles at Grantek he has worked as a controls engineer, a systems engineer and an IT/OT consultant to bridge the gap between IT and Controls teams in order to help clients realize more efficient operations, leverage or implement standardized systems and most importantly understand the line between IT and OT and how it can and will shift with emerging technology and industry changes. He specifically focuses on the OT side today providing network assessments and road mapping a migration plan for a client’s legacy or inefficient hardware as part of a client provided, or jointly developed OSA (Manufacturing Operations Systems Architecture).
Emerging Technology Leadership Series: Brian Behlendorf and Blockchain
 
01:02:21
A recent report from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development analyzed more than 200 government blockchain programs globally, a community that is rapidly growing as public services explore the immense potential of this emerging technology. In order to better learn about blockchain and evaluate solutions that improve transaction performance, traceability, and trust, public services must collaborate not just across silos between agencies, but side-by-side with the businesses, academic researchers, and organizations that are leading these advances. The Hyperledger Project, started in December 2015 by the Linux Foundation, is an open source initiative to support the collaborative development of blockchain-based distributed ledgers. In this first of our new Emerging Technology Leadership Series, we invite Brian Behlendorf, executive director of the Hyperledger Project and one of The New York Times’s “Top 10 People Leading the Blockchain Revolution,” answer your questions about collaborative development of blockchain solutions and share insights from the source on what public services need to know. The Emerging Technology Leadership Series, hosted by the U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) Emerging Citizen Technology Office, is a six-part livestream pilot to enhance the modern federal workforce with training, education, and awareness of emerging technologies including Artificial Intelligence, Robotic Process Automation, Blockchain, Social Technologies, and Virtual/Augmented Reality.
Views: 423 DigitalGov
DEF CON 21 - Dan Griffin - Protecting Data with Short Lived Encryption Keys
 
22:00
Protecting Data with Short-Lived Encryption Keys and Hardware Root of Trust DAN GRIFFIN PRESIDENT, JW SECURE, INC. The US National Security Agency has been public about the inevitability of mobile computing and the need to support cloud-based service use for secret projects. General Alexander, head of the NSA, recently spoke of using smartphones as ID cards on classified networks. And yet, mobile devices have a poor security track record, both as data repositories and as sources of trustworthy identity information. Cloud services are no better: current security features are oriented toward compliance and not toward real protection. What if we could provide a strong link between mobile device identity, integrity, and the lifecycle of data retrieved from the cloud using only the hardware shipped with modern smartphones and tablets? The good news is that we can do that with the trusted execution environment (TEE) features of the common system on a chip (SOC) mobile processor architectures using 'measurement-bound' encryption. This talk will describe how data can be encrypted to a specific device, how decryption is no longer possible when the device is compromised, and where the weaknesses are. I will demonstrate measurement-bound encryption in action. I will also announce the release of an open-source tool that implements it as well as a paper that describes the techniques for time-bound keys. This is likely the very same way that NSA will be protecting the smartphones that will be used for classified information retrieval. Come learn how your government plans to keep its own secrets and how you can protect yours. Dan Griffin (@JWSdan) is the founder of JW Secure and is a Microsoft Enterprise Security MVP. Dan is the author of the books Cloud Security and Control, published in 2012, and The Four Pillars of Endpoint Security, to be published in 2013, and is a frequent conference speaker. Dan holds a Master's degree in Computer Science from the University of Washington and a Bachelor's degree in Computer Science from Indiana University. Materials: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-21/dc-21-presentations/Griffin/DEFCON-21-Dan-Griffin-Protecting-Data-Updated.pdf
Views: 662 DEFCONConference
Vinton G. Cerf: Cybersecurity
 
01:29:00
Vinton G. Cerf, vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google, addresses CISAC's 2014 Drell Lecture. The Stanford graduate and co-founder of the architecture of the Internet tells the audience that cybersecurity is a shared responsibility among private industry and governments worldwide.
Views: 1991 CISAC Stanford
Andrew Hinkes - The Law of Forks
 
01:01:18
OnChain Scaling Conference presentation - August 30, 2016 "The Law of forks" www.onchainscaling.com [email protected]
Views: 252 OnChain Scaling
Information security
 
01:03:55
Information security, sometimes shortened to InfoSec, is the practice of defending information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction. It is a general term that can be used regardless of the form the data may take (electronic, physical, etc.) This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 75 Audiopedia
Information security
 
01:04:10
Information security, sometimes shortened to InfoSec, is the practice of defending information from unauthorized access, use, disclosure, disruption, modification, perusal, inspection, recording or destruction. It is a general term that can be used regardless of the form the data may take This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 432 encyclopediacc
Crime: The Real Internet Security Problem
 
58:20
Google TechTalks January 24, 2006 Phillip Hallam-Baker Dr Hallam-Baker is a leading designer or Internet security protocols and has made substantial contributions to the HTTP Digest Authentication mechanism, XKMS, SAML and WS-Security. He is currently working on the DKIM email signing protocol, federated identity systems and completing his first book, The dotCrime Manifesto which sets out a comprehensive strategy for defeating Internet crime. Dr Hallam-Baker has a degree in Electronic Engineering from Southampton University and a doctorate in Computer Science from the Nuclear Physics Laboratory at Oxford University. ABSTRACT Internet Crime is a serious and growing problem. Phishing,...
Views: 12163 Google
IGF-USA 2015 - Keynote Conversation with Vint Cerf and Steve Crocker
 
01:28:26
IGF-USA 2015 - Keynote Conversation with Vint Cerf and Steve Crocker, moderated by Nancy Scola Vinton Cerf – Chief Internet Evangelist, Former Chair of ICANN; Steve Crocker – CEO and Co-Founder, Shinkuro. Inc and Chair, ICANN Board; Nancy Scola – POLITICO. Transcript: http://isoc-ny.org/usaigf15/03-igf-usa2015-cerf-crocker.pdf Original webcast: https://livestream.com/internetsociety/igfusa2015 ABOUT THE IGF-USA The Internet Governance Forum was created to support the United Nations Secretary-General in carrying out the mandate from the World Summit on the Information Society (WSIS) with regard to convening a new forum for multi-stakeholder policy dialogue. Each year, leading up to the IGF, various national and regional IGFs tee up multi-stakeholder dialogues on a broad range of Internet policy issues. These discussions help to shape the ongoing policy discussions at the global IGF. Each region brings with it unique perspectives on how they have dealt with important policy concerns and can offer best practices on how to approach these issues to the global community. The Washington DC Chapter of the Internet Society (ISOC-DC) serves as the IGF Secretariat. ISOC-DC strives to promote open development, evolution, and use of the Internet for the benefit of people worldwide. ISOC-DC brings together individuals from within the DC area, as well as abroad, to engage in events, discussions, and information exchanges to advance these goals. http://www.igf-usa.org
Hardware Security for Smart Grid End Point Devices
 
01:13:18
Shrinath Eswarahally of Infinion hosted this webinar on hardware security for smart grid end point devices on May 11, 2016, as part of NREL’s Smart Grid Educational Series.
Views: 467 NREL Learning

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