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Digital Signatures
 
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This video is part of the Udacity course "Intro to Information Security". Watch the full course at https://www.udacity.com/course/ud459
Views: 40283 Udacity
21. Cryptography: Hash Functions
 
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MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas covers the basics of cryptography, including desirable properties of cryptographic functions, and their applications to security. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 61816 MIT OpenCourseWare
Symmetric Key and Public Key Encryption
 
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Modern day encryption is performed in two different ways. Check out http://YouTube.com/ITFreeTraining or http://itfreetraining.com for more of our always free training videos. Using the same key or using a pair of keys called the public and private keys. This video looks at how these systems work and how they can be used together to perform encryption. Download the PDF handout http://itfreetraining.com/Handouts/Ce... Encryption Types Encryption is the process of scrambling data so it cannot be read without a decryption key. Encryption prevents data being read by a 3rd party if it is intercepted by a 3rd party. The two encryption methods that are used today are symmetric and public key encryption. Symmetric Key Symmetric key encryption uses the same key to encrypt data as decrypt data. This is generally quite fast when compared with public key encryption. In order to protect the data, the key needs to be secured. If a 3rd party was able to gain access to the key, they could decrypt any data that was encrypt with that data. For this reason, a secure channel is required to transfer the key if you need to transfer data between two points. For example, if you encrypted data on a CD and mail it to another party, the key must also be transferred to the second party so that they can decrypt the data. This is often done using e-mail or the telephone. In a lot of cases, sending the data using one method and the key using another method is enough to protect the data as an attacker would need to get both in order to decrypt the data. Public Key Encryption This method of encryption uses two keys. One key is used to encrypt data and the other key is used to decrypt data. The advantage of this is that the public key can be downloaded by anyone. Anyone with the public key can encrypt data that can only be decrypted using a private key. This means the public key does not need to be secured. The private key does need to be keep in a safe place. The advantage of using such a system is the private key is not required by the other party to perform encryption. Since the private key does not need to be transferred to the second party there is no risk of the private key being intercepted by a 3rd party. Public Key encryption is slower when compared with symmetric key so it is not always suitable for every application. The math used is complex but to put it simply it uses the modulus or remainder operator. For example, if you wanted to solve X mod 5 = 2, the possible solutions would be 2, 7, 12 and so on. The private key provides additional information which allows the problem to be solved easily. The math is more complex and uses much larger numbers than this but basically public and private key encryption rely on the modulus operator to work. Combing The Two There are two reasons you want to combine the two. The first is that often communication will be broken into two steps. Key exchange and data exchange. For key exchange, to protect the key used in data exchange it is often encrypted using public key encryption. Although slower than symmetric key encryption, this method ensures the key cannot accessed by a 3rd party while being transferred. Since the key has been transferred using a secure channel, a symmetric key can be used for data exchange. In some cases, data exchange may be done using public key encryption. If this is the case, often the data exchange will be done using a small key size to reduce the processing time. The second reason that both may be used is when a symmetric key is used and the key needs to be provided to multiple users. For example, if you are using encryption file system (EFS) this allows multiple users to access the same file, which includes recovery users. In order to make this possible, multiple copies of the same key are stored in the file and protected from being read by encrypting it with the public key of each user that requires access. References "Public-key cryptography" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Public-k... "Encryption" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Encryption
Views: 417984 itfreetraining
Bitcoin 101 - Elliptic Curve Cryptography - Part 4 - Generating the Public Key (in Python)
 
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Welcome to part four in our series on Elliptic Curve Cryptography. I this episode we dive into the development of the public key. In just 44 lines of code, with no special functions or imports, we produce the elliptic curve public key for use in Bitcoin. Better still, we walk you through it line by line, constant by constant. Nothing makes the process clearer and easier to understand than seeing it in straight forward code. If you've been wondering about the secp256k1 (arguably the most important piece of code in Bitcoin), well then this is the video for you. This is part 4 of our upcoming series on Elliptic Curves. Because of such strong requests, even though this is part 4, it is the first one we are releasing. In the next few weeks we will release the rest of the series. Enjoy. Here's the link to our Python code (Python 2.7.6): https://github.com/wobine/blackboard101/blob/master/EllipticCurvesPart4-PrivateKeyToPublicKey.py Here's the private key and the link to the public address that we use. Do you know why it is famous? Private Key : A0DC65FFCA799873CBEA0AC274015B9526505DAAAED385155425F7337704883E Public Address on Blockchain.info https://blockchain.info/address/1JryTePceSiWVpoNBU8SbwiT7J4ghzijzW Here's the private key we use at the end: 42F615A574E9CEB29E1D5BD0FDE55553775A6AF0663D569D0A2E45902E4339DB Public Address on Blockchain.info https://blockchain.info/address/16iTdS1yJhQ6NNQRJqsW9BF5UfgWwUsbF Welcome to WBN's Bitcoin 101 Blackboard Series -- a full beginner to expert course in bitcoin. Please like, subscribe, comment or even drop a little jangly in our bitcoin tip jar 1javsf8GNsudLaDue3dXkKzjtGM8NagQe. Thanks, WBN
Views: 20294 CRI
George Musser: "Spooky Action at a Distance" | Talks at Google
 
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Over the past few decades, physicists have discovered a phenomenon that operates outside the confines of space and time: nonlocality - the ability of two particles to act in harmony no matter how far apart they may be. Einstein grappled with this oddity and couldn't come to terms with it, describing it as "spooky action at a distance." More recently, the mystery has deepened as other forms of nonlocality have been uncovered. This strange occurrence, which has direct connections to black holes, particle collisions, and even the workings of gravity, holds the potential to undermine our most basic understandings of physical reality. If space isn't what we thought it was, then what is it? In this talk "Spooky Action at a Distance: The Phenomenon That Reimagines Space and Time--and What It Means for Black Holes, the Big Bang, and Theories of Everything", George Musser sets out to answer that question, offering a provocative exploration of nonlocality and a celebration of the scientists who are trying to explain it. He traces the often contentious debates over nonlocality through major discoveries and disruptions of the twentieth century and shows how scientists faced with the same undisputed experimental evidence develop wildly different explanations for that evidence.
Views: 13700 Talks at Google
What is a HashTable Data Structure - Introduction to Hash Tables , Part 0
 
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This tutorial is an introduction to hash tables. A hash table is a data structure that is used to implement an associative array. This video explains some of the basic concepts regarding hash tables, and also discusses one method (chaining) that can be used to avoid collisions. Wan't to learn C++? I highly recommend this book http://amzn.to/1PftaSt Donate http://bit.ly/17vCDFx
Views: 700482 Paul Programming
Zerocash: Addressing Bitcoin's Privacy Problem
 
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A Google TechTalk, 8/28/17, presented by Alessandro Chiesa Abstract: In Bitcoin, a payment's details are broadcast in the clear, so that anyone can verify its validity. Unfortunately, this violates user privacy and sacrifices coin fungibility. I will describe the Zerocash protocol, which uses zero knowledge proofs to achieve privacy-preserving payments in a Bitcoin-like system. This protocol was recently deployed in the wild, as part of the cryptocurrency Zcash. About the Speaker: Alessandro Chiesa is an assistant professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at UC Berkeley. His research spans the areas of complexity theory, cryptography, and security, and focuses on the theoretical foundations and practical implementations of cryptographic proof systems such as zero knowledge proofs. He is a co-inventor of Zerocash and co-founder of Zcash. He is an author of libsnark, the leading open-source library for succinct zero knowledge proofs. He has received a Ph.D. in computer science from MIT in 2014, and B.S. degrees in computer science and in mathematics from MIT in 2009.
Views: 2851 GoogleTechTalks
What is ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE? What does ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE mean? ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE meaning & explanation
 
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What is ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE? What does ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE mean? ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE meaning - ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE definition - ZOOKO'S TRIANGLE explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Zooko's triangle is a trilemma of three properties that are generally considered desirable for names of participants in a network protocol: Human-meaningful: Meaningful and memorable (low-entropy) names are provided to the users. Secure: The amount of damage a malicious entity can inflict on the system should be as low as possible. Decentralized: Names correctly resolve to their respective entities without the use of a central authority or service. Zooko Wilcox-O'Hearn conjectured that no single kind of name can achieve more than two. For example: DNSSec offers a secure, human-meaningful naming scheme, but is not secure against compromise by the root; .onion addresses and bitcoin addresses are secure and decentralized but not human-meaningful; and I2P uses name translation services which are secure (as they run locally) and provide human-meaningful names - but fail to provide unique entities when used globally in a decentralised network without authorities. Several systems which exhibit all three properties of Zooko's triangle have now been created, including: Computer scientist Nick Szabo's paper "Secure Property Titles with Owner Authority" illustrated that all three properties can be achieved up to the limits of Byzantine fault tolerance. Activist Aaron Swartz described a naming system based on Bitcoin employing Bitcoin's distributed blockchain as a proof-of-work to establish consensus of domain name ownership. These systems remain vulnerable to Sybil attack, but are secure under Byzantine assumptions. Namecoin now implements the concept. Several platforms implement refutations of Zooko's conjecture, including: Twister (which use the later Aaron Swartz system with a bitcoin-like system), Blockstack (which can run on any blockchain and currently uses Bitcoin), Namecoin (separate blockchain), and Monero OpenAlias.
Views: 20 The Audiopedia
Blockchain Basics Explained - Hashes with Mining and Merkle trees
 
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A brief and simple introduction to the hash function and how blockchain solutions use it for proof of work (mining) and data integrity (Merkle Trees).
Views: 197031 Chainthat
What is CRYPTOVIROLOGY? What does CRYPTOVIROLOGY mean? CRYPTOVIROLOGY meaning & explanation
 
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What is CRYPTOVIROLOGY? What does CRYPTOVIROLOGY mean? CRYPTOVIROLOGY meaning - CRYPTOVIROLOGY pronunciation - CRYPTOVIROLOGY definition - CRYPTOVIROLOGY explanation - How to pronounce CRYPTOVIROLOGY? Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Cryptovirology is a field that studies how to use cryptography to design powerful malicious software. The field was born with the observation that public-key cryptography can be used to break the symmetry between what an antivirus analyst sees regarding malware and what the attacker sees. The antivirus analyst sees a public key contained in the malware whereas the attacker sees the public key contained in the malware as well as the corresponding private key (outside the malware) since the attacker created the key pair for the attack. The public key allows the malware to perform trapdoor one-way operations on the victim's computer that only the attacker can undo. The first attack that was identified by Adam L. Young and Moti Yung in the field is called "cryptoviral extortion" and it was presented at the 1996 IEEE Security & Privacy conference. In this attack a cryptovirus, cryptoworm, or cryptotrojan contains the public key of the attacker and hybrid encrypts the victim's files. The malware prompts the user to send the asymmetric ciphertext to the attacker who will decipher it and return the symmetric decryption key it contains for a fee. The victim needs the symmetric key to get the files back if there are no backups of them. The 1996 IEEE paper of Young and Yung predicted that cryptoviral extortion attackers would one day demand e-money, long before bitcoin even existed. Many years later the media relabeled cryptoviral extortion as ransomware. In 2016 cryptovirology attacks on healthcare providers reached epidemic levels prompting the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to issue a Fact Sheet on Ransomware and HIPAA. The fact sheet states that when electronic protected health information is encrypted by ransomware a breach has occurred and the attack therefore constitutes a disclosure that is not permitted under HIPAA. The rationale being that an adversary has taken control of the information. This expansion of the term "breach" to account for cryptoviral extortion is monumental since now a "breach" can happen even when sensitive data never leaves the victim organization. California enacted a law that defines the introduction of ransomware into a computer system with the intent of extortion as being against the law. This is SB-1137 that amends Section 523 of the Penal Code. The field also encompasses covert malware attacks in which the attacker securely steals private information such as symmetric keys, private keys, PRNG state, and the victim's data. Examples of such covert attacks are asymmetric backdoors. An asymmetric backdoor is a backdoor (e.g., in a cryptosystem) that can be used only by the attacker, even after it is found. This contrasts with the traditional backdoor that is symmetric, i.e., anyone that finds it can use it. Kleptography, a subfield of cryptovirology, is the study of asymmetric back doors in key generation algorithms, digital signature algorithms, key exchanges, pseudorandom number generators, encryption algorithms, and other cryptographic algorithms. The NIST Dual EC DRBG random bit generator has an asymmetric backdoor in it. The EC-DRBG algorithm utilizes the discrete-log kleptogram from Kleptography which by definition makes the EC-DRBG a cryptotrojan. Like ransomware, the EC-DRBG cryptotrojan contains and uses the attacker's public key to attack the host system. A highly respected cryptographer, Ari Juels, indicated that NSA effectively orchestrated a kleptographic attack on users of the Dual EC DRBG pseudorandom number generation algorithm and that, although security professionals and developers have been testing and implementing kleptographic attacks since 1996, "you would be hard-pressed to find one in actual use until now". Due to public outcry of this cryptovirology attack, NIST rescinded the EC-DRBG algorithm from the NIST SP 800-90 standard.
Views: 261 The Audiopedia
What is FIREWALL PINHOLE? What does FIREWALL PINHOLE mean? FIREWALL PINHOLE meaning & explanation
 
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What is FIREWALL PINHOLE? What does FIREWALL PINHOLE mean? FIREWALL PINHOLE meaning - FIREWALL PINHOLE definition - FIREWALL PINHOLE explanation. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. In computer networking, a firewall pinhole is a port that is not protected by a firewall to allow a particular application to gain access to a service on a host in the network protected by the firewall. Leaving ports open in firewall configurations exposes the protected system to potentially malicious abuse. A fully closed firewall prevents applications from accessing services on the other side of the firewall. For protection, the mechanism for opening a pinhole in the firewall should implement user validation and authorization. For firewalls performing a network address translation (NAT) function, the mapping between the external {IP address, port} socket and the internal {IP address, port} socket is often called a pinhole. Pinholes can be created manually or programmatically. They can be temporary, created dynamically for a specific duration such as for a dynamic connection, or permanent, such as for signaling functions. Firewalls sometimes automatically close pinholes after a period of time (typically a few minutes) to minimize the security exposure. Applications that require a pinhole to be kept open often need to generate artificial traffic through the pinhole in order to cause the firewall to restart its timer.
Views: 19 The Audiopedia
Overview of the Solid Waste Optimization Framework and Illustrative Analyses
 
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While previous research has applied environmental life-cycle assessment (LCA) to solid waste management (SWM) using formal search techniques, existing models are either not readily generalizable and scalable, or optimize only a single time period and do not consider changes likely to affect SWM over time, such as new policy and technology innovation. The Solid Waste Optimization Life-cycle Framework (SWOLF) presents the first life cycle-based framework to optimize—over multiple time stages—the collection and treatment of all waste materials from curb to final disposal by minimizing cost and environmental impacts, while considering user-defined emissions, waste diversion constraints and future changes in energy and GHG prices. Specifically, the framework allows for the cost of energy and emissions to change over time in response to policy changes (e.g., cap and trade, carbon tax). The framework considers the use of existing SWM infrastructure as well as the deployment and utilization of new infrastructure. SWOLF was used to illustrate how a typical suburban U.S. city can proactively and sustainably adapt their SWM system over the next 30 years including potential changes in the energy system.
Views: 551 ISWM NCSU
Merkle Tree Proof (MTP) Algorithm in Zcoin
 
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Zcoin is the first cryptocurrency to successfully code MTP from the ground up and implement it. MTP is an algorithm that offers a memory hard proof of work that remains lightweight to verify thus promoting a decentralized and scalable network. https://www.zcoin.io Bitcointalk thread: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=1638450.0
Views: 7283 Zcoin
What is HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL? What does HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL mean?
 
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What is HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL? What does HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL mean? HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL meaning - HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL definition - HOST IDENTITY PROTOCOL explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ The Host Identity Protocol (HIP) is a host identification technology for use on Internet Protocol (IP) networks, such as the Internet. The Internet has two main name spaces, IP addresses and the Domain Name System. HIP separates the end-point identifier and locator roles of IP addresses. It introduces a Host Identity (HI) name space, based on a public key security infrastructure. The Host Identity Protocol provides secure methods for IP multihoming and mobile computing. In networks that implement the Host Identity Protocol, all occurrences of IP addresses in applications are eliminated and replaced with cryptographic host identifiers. The cryptographic keys are typically, but not necessarily, self-generated. The effect of eliminating IP addresses in application and transport layers is a decoupling of the transport layer from the internetworking layer (Internet Layer) in TCP/IP. HIP was specified in the IETF HIP working group. An Internet Research Task Force (IRTF) HIP research group looks at the broader impacts of HIP. The working group is chartered to produce Requests for Comments on the "Experimental" track, but it is understood that their quality and security properties should match the standards track requirements. The main purpose for producing Experimental documents instead of standards track ones are the unknown effects that the mechanisms may have on applications and on the Internet in the large.
Views: 277 The Audiopedia
What Is Privacy Enhanced Mail?
 
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Privacy enhanced mail in more detail sciencedirect. What is privacy enhanced mail? Youtubeprivacy mail youtube. Rfc 1421 prescribes protocol privacy enhanced mail (pem) consists of extensions to existing message processing software plus a key management infrastruc ture. Ripem allows electronic mail to have the four security facilities acknowledgements this document is outgrowth of a series meetings privacy and research group (psrg) irtf pem enhanced. They include originator authentication, (optional) message confidentiality, and data integrity description of pem (privacy enhanced mail) from tom sheldon's encyclopedia networking telecommunications privacy mail is a standard format for encryption signature's in electronic messages, using asymmetric encryption, public key's private 28 aug 2017 this document will make you understand the basic issues related to e like, spamming, bombing, malware, email spoofing 30 dec 2009 (pem) an internet provide secure over house communication infrastructures sep. Pem provides a range of security features. Abstract the progress of work at university college london in implementing a prototype model privacy enhanced internet mail, published by acm 1993 articlecitation count 28 downloads (cumulative) 1,686 Privacy electronic mail wikipedia. These combine to provide privacy enhanced mail (pem), is a 1993 ietf proposal for securing email using public key cryptography. Rfc 1421 privacy enhancement for internet electronic mail part i enhanced ieee conference publication. Internet privacy enhanced mail acsac. Privacy enhanced mail (pem) umbc cseee security pgp (pretty good privacy) & pem (privacy mail) (linktionary term) linktionary. Pem, privacy enhanced mail network sorcery. Although pem became an ietf proposed standard it keywords security, privacy enhanced mail, public key cryptology, pem, certificate, certification authoritywithin the internet, number of 19 dec 1997 riordan's internet mail (ripem) is implementation. E mail security protocol 1 privacy enhanced (pem) protocollogical. Pem employs a range of cryptographic techniques to allow for confidentiality, sender authentication, and message integrity 7 jul 2006 [note on terminology the term 'privacy enhanced mail' is name an early internet standard. Privacy enhanced mail standard 13 youtube. Relevant mechanisms ''6 mar 2015a series of documents defining privacy enhancement for electronic mail transferred using internet protocols. Privacy enhanced mail is a set of protocols and mechanisms providing confidentiality authentication for internet electronic. What are kerberos, pgp, pem, ssl, s and ipsec? . Definition of privacy enhanced mail hitachi id. Internet privacy enhanced mail. Privacy enhanced mail (pem) is an internet standard that provides for secure exchange of electronic. Privacy enhanced electronic mail wikipedia. I'm using it in a more generic sense to refer privacy enhanced mail (pem) is an internet standard that provides for secure exchange of electronic.
Views: 33 E Answers
How does a blockchain work - Simply Explained
 
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What is a blockchain and how do they work? I'll explain why blockchains are so special in simple and plain English! 💰 Want to buy Bitcoin or Ethereum? Buy for $100 and get $10 free (through my affiliate link): https://www.coinbase.com/join/59284524822a3d0b19e11134 📚 Sources can be found on my website: https://www.savjee.be/videos/simply-explained/how-does-a-blockchain-work/ 🐦 Follow me on Twitter: https://twitter.com/savjee ✏️ Check out my blog: https://www.savjee.be ✉️ Subscribe to newsletter: https://goo.gl/nueDfz 👍🏻 Like my Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/savjee
Views: 2009767 Simply Explained - Savjee
Discovering Satoshi: Nick Szabo
 
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Thinking about purchasing a Ledger Nano Hardware Wallet? Browse their official website: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/67ef Want to join coinbase to begin your crypto journey? Here’s a link to get free $10: https://www.coinbase.com/join/558828dc34383271a500003b Step up your game and Check Out Binance too: https://www.binance.com/?ref=10080191 Join the Robinhood app and invite your friends to Robinhood and win free stock. Here's my invite: http://share.robinhood.com/heidic1 Find me on Steemit: www.steemit.com/@heiditravels Twitter: @blockchainchick Instagram: @hheidiann If you’re looking for an app that tracks the price of BTC & ETH and many other coins, check out the CoinView App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=br.com.freeflowt.coinview LINKS FOR ADDITIONAL READING FOR THIS VIDEO & ALL INFO IN TEXT DOWN BELOW: Wiki: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nick_Szabo Twitter: https://twitter.com/NickSzabo4 Nick Szabo Blog: https://unenumerated.blogspot.com/2018/ Interview with Tim Ferris: https://tim.blog/2017/06/04/nick-szabo/ Similar Thoughts, Satoshi and Szabo: https://medium.com/@rextar4444/if-satoshi-nakamoto-and-nick-szabo-have-the-same-unique-argument-does-that-make-it-stronger-8299c32eb4d7 Shelling Out: http://nakamotoinstitute.org/shelling-out/ Logical Emergence of Money from Barter: http://nakamotoinstitute.org/shelling-out/ Byzantine Fault-Tolerace: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Byzantine_fault_tolerance Today’s subject is Nick Szabo. Nick is a polymath, meaning he is an expert in many different subject areas. In his case, he is a computer scientist, economist, and legal scholar and cryptographer. This guy has had quite the foresight with his ideas and things that have ended up coming to fruition in this crypto space. He designed “Bit Gold” about a decade before Bitcoin, which has been called the predecessor for the Bitcoin architecture. Bit gold would have worked so that participants would dedicate computer power to solve cryptographic puzzles and each solution for these puzzles would have served as a part of the next challenge. Sounds a bit like the beginning of a chain to me… These solutions would then be reported to a Byzantine fault-tolerant public register. Byzantine fault tolerance or BFT is a way to organize (in this case) a system of computers to address and defend against the failure of a system. He even created the concept and phrase “smart contracts” way back in 1993 because he had the goal of bringing “highly evolved” practices of contract law together with the design of electronic commerce protocols between strangers on the internet. Now we are seeing the huge growth of the implementation of smart contracts all over this crypto space with Ethereum and ERC20 tokens. As with a number of other individuals I’ve previously covered in this “Discovering Satoshi” series, Nick Szabo has been hounded by people trying to solve the mystery of identifying the anonymous Bitcoin creator who goes by or at the very least, went by Satoshi Nakamoto. Is it really even important anymore to put a face to the name? What should be more important and more highly valued is what was created, not who specifically created it. If you couldn’t tell already, I’m partial to learning more about a whole host of individuals who played a part in the creation and facilitation of this crypto space. Lucky for us, Nick Szabo has a lot of thoughts on things like economics, cryptography and other topics, he’s also a great writer. He’s got a blog that I think is very much worth checking out if you’re interested in expanding your knowledge library. You can find it at unenumerated.blogspot.com. His blog goes really in-depth and there’s a ton of material there for you to check out, he doesn’t post all too often, but when he does, it’s worth it.
Views: 3396 Crypto Tips
CppCon 2017: Matt Kulukundis “Designing a Fast, Efficient, Cache-friendly Hash Table, Step by Step”
 
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http://CppCon.org — Presentation Slides, PDFs, Source Code and other presenter materials are available at: https://github.com/CppCon/CppCon2017 — Hash tables consume a large volume of both compute resources and memory across Google's production system. The design for hash tables in C++ traces its origins to the SGI STL implementation from 20 years ago. Over these years, computer architecture and performance has changed dramatically and we need to evolve this fundamental data structure to follow those changes. This talk describes the process of design and optimization that starts with std::unordered_map and ends with a new design we call "SwissTable", a 2-level N-way associative hash table. Our implementation of this new design gets 2-3x better performance with significant memory reductions (compared to unordered_map) and is being broadly deployed across Google. — Matt Kulukundis: Google, Senior Software Engineer Matt is a senior software engineer on the C++ libraries team at Google. Prior to Google he has worked on compilers, machine learning, and underwater robotics. In his free time, he scuba dives in warm places. — Videos Filmed & Edited by Bash Films: http://www.BashFilms.com
Views: 14368 CppCon
Hashing and Hash table in data structure and algorithm
 
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This video lecture is produced by S. Saurabh. He is B.Tech from IIT and MS from USA. hashing in data structure hash table hash function hashing in dbms To study interview questions on Linked List watch http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3D11462114F778D7&feature=view_all To prepare for programming Interview Questions on Binary Trees http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC3855D81E15BC990&feature=view_all To study programming Interview questions on Stack, Queues, Arrays visit http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL65BCEDD6788C3F27&feature=view_all To watch all Programming Interview Questions visit http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLD629C50E1A85BF84&feature=view_all To learn about Pointers in C visit http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLC68607ACFA43C084&feature=view_all To learn C programming from IITian S.Saurabh visit http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3C47C530C457BACD&feature=view_all
Views: 294249 saurabhschool
Public Key Cryptography: Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange (short version)
 
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This is a segment of this full video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YEBfamv-_do Diffie-Hellman key exchange was one of the earliest practical implementations of key exchange within the field of cryptography. It relies on the discrete logarithm problem. This test clip will be part of the final chapter of Gambling with Secrets!
Views: 435574 Art of the Problem
Dash: QT Wallet Receiving Address = G15E18
 
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Dash: QT Wallet Receiving Address What is : https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325335 How to: https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325343 Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 2929 Dash
8. Randomization: Universal & Perfect Hashing
 
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MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Erik Demaine In this lecture, Professor Demaine reviews hashing in the context of randomized algorithms. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 21432 MIT OpenCourseWare
Dash: QT Wallet CheckSum Guide - Windows = G15E14
 
02:26
Dash: QT Wallet CheckSum Guide - Windows What is : https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325335 How to: https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325343 Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 107 Dash
Cryptography Concepts - CompTIA Security+ SY0-501 - 6.1
 
07:52
Security+ Training Course Index: http://professormesser.link/sy0501 Professor Messer’s Course Notes: http://professormesser.link/501cn Frequently Asked Questions: http://professormesser.link/faq - - - - - The basics of cryptography are valuable fundamentals for building a secure network. In this video, you’ll learn about cryptographic terms, the value of the key, the concepts of confusion and diffusion, and more. - - - - - Subscribe to get the latest videos: http://professormesser.link/yt Calendar of live events: http://www.professormesser.com/calendar/ FOLLOW PROFESSOR MESSER: Professor Messer official website: http://www.professormesser.com/ Twitter: http://www.professormesser.com/twitter Facebook: http://www.professormesser.com/facebook Instagram: http://www.professormesser.com/instagram Google +: http://www.professormesser.com/googleplus
Views: 10550 Professor Messer
Understand the Blockchain in Two Minutes
 
02:26
Over the past decade, an alternative digital paradigm has slowly been taking shape at the edges of the internet. This new paradigm is the blockchain. After incubating through millions of Bitcoin transactions and a host of developer projects, it is now on the tips of tongues of CEOs and CTOs, startup entrepreneurs, and even governance activists. Though these stakeholders are beginning to understand the disruptive potential of blockchain technology and are experimenting with its most promising applications, few have asked a more fundamental question: What will a world driven by blockchains look like a decade from now? Learn more: http://www.iftf.org/blockchainfutureslab Contact us: http://www.iftf.org/blockchainfutureslab/contact
How Bitcoin Works in 5 Minutes (Technical)
 
05:26
A short introduction to how Bitcoin Works. Want more? Check out my new in-depth course on the latest in Bitcoin, Blockchain, and a survey of the most exciting projects coming out (Ethereum, etc): https://app.pluralsight.com/library/courses/bitcoin-decentralized-technology Lots of demos on how to buy, send, store (hardware, paper wallet). how to use javascript to send bitcoin. How to create Ethereum Smart Contract, much more. Written Version: http://www.imponderablethings.com/2014/04/how-bitcoin-works-in-5-minutes.html Less technical version: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5JGQXCTe3c Donation address: 1K7A6wsyxj6fThtMYcNu6X8bLbnNKovgtP Germain caption translation provided by adi331 : 19s6rqRfHa19w7wcgwtCumPs1vdLDj1VVo (thanks!!)
Views: 5562997 CuriousInventor
Lecture - 32 Basic Cryptographic Concepts Part : I
 
59:56
Lecture Series on Internet Technologies by Prof.I.Sengupta, Department of Computer Science & Engineering ,IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 102253 nptelhrd
Dash: QT Wallet Private Key Export/Import = G15E17
 
10:44
Dash: QT Wallet Private Key Export/Import What is : https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325335 How to: https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325343 Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 4865 Dash
Ever wonder how Bitcoin (and other cryptocurrencies) actually work?
 
26:21
Bitcoin explained from the viewpoint of inventing your own cryptocurrency. Videos like these made possible by patreon: https://patreon.com/3blue1brown Protocol Labs: https://protocol.ai/ Interested in contributing? https://protocol.ai/join/ Special thanks to the following patrons: http://3b1b.co/btc-thanks Some people have asked if this channel accepts contributions in cryptocurrency form as an alternative to Patreon. As you might guess, the answer is yes :). Here are the relevant addresses: ETH: 0x88Fd7a2e9e0E616a5610B8BE5d5090DC6Bd55c25 BTC: 1DV4dhXEVhGELmDnRppADyMcyZgGHnCNJ BCH: qrr82t07zzq5uqgek422s8wwf953jj25c53lqctlnw LTC: LNPY2HEWv8igGckwKrYPbh9yD28XH3sm32 Supplement video: https://youtu.be/S9JGmA5_unY Music by Vincent Rubinetti: https://soundcloud.com/vincerubinetti/heartbeat Here are a few other resources I'd recommend: Original Bitcoin paper: https://bitcoin.org/bitcoin.pdf Block explorer: https://blockexplorer.com/ Blog post by Michael Nielsen: https://goo.gl/BW1RV3 (This is particularly good for understanding the details of what transactions look like, which is something this video did not cover) Video by CuriousInventor: https://youtu.be/Lx9zgZCMqXE Video by Anders Brownworth: https://youtu.be/_160oMzblY8 Ethereum white paper: https://goo.gl/XXZddT Music by Vince Rubinetti: https://vincerubinetti.bandcamp.com/album/the-music-of-3blue1brown ------------------ 3blue1brown is a channel about animating math, in all senses of the word animate. And you know the drill with YouTube, if you want to stay posted on new videos, subscribe, and click the bell to receive notifications (if you're into that). If you are new to this channel and want to see more, a good place to start is this playlist: http://3b1b.co/recommended Various social media stuffs: Website: https://www.3blue1brown.com Twitter: https://twitter.com/3Blue1Brown Patreon: https://patreon.com/3blue1brown Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/3blue1brown Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/3Blue1Brown
Views: 2170089 3Blue1Brown
PCI Requirement 3.6.1 Generation of Strong Cryptographic Keys
 
01:50
PCI Requirement 3.6.1 requires, “Generation of strong cryptographic keys.” It also requires that, “The encryption solution must generate strong keys, as defined in the PCI DSS and PA-DSS Glossary of Terms, Abbreviations, and Acronyms under ""Cryptographic Key Generation."" The intent of PCI Requirement 3.6.1, according to the PCI DSS, is to “significantly increases the level of security of encrypted cardholder data.” PCI Requirement 3.6.1 is part of the 8 sub-requirements of PCI Requirement 3.6, which is meant to build your organization’s key management program because, the PCI DSS states, “The manner in which cryptographic keys are managed is a critical part of the continued security of the encryption solution. A good key management process, whether it is manual or automated as part of the encryption product, is based on industry standards and addresses all key elements at 3.6.1 through 3.6.8.” We recommend that you perform a risk assessment around the generation of your cryptographic keys; this way, you can see if your keys become weakened or hold up. Industry standards, like NIST, should be used when determining how to manage and generate keys. If you store, process, or transmit cardholder data, interact with payment card data in any way, or have the ability to impact someone else’s cardholder information or the security of that information, you are subject to comply with the PCI DSS. This exclusive video series, PCI Demystified, was developed to assist your organization in understanding what the Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI DSS) is, who it applies to, what the specific requirements are, and what your organizations needs to know and do to become compliant. Learn more at https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/pci-requirement-3-6-1-generation-strong-cryptographic-keys/ Video Transcription If you’re using encryption within your environment, you need to use strong encryption. What this effectively means is that you need to generate strong keys. Once again, you need to be using an industry best practice for this. One of the things that I would recommend that you do as part of your risk management program, just like the annual risk assessment that you’re required to do, is that you perform somewhat of a risk assessment around the generation of your keys. If during the period of time, your encryption keys become deprecated or weakened because of some change to the industry, you must have a process for generating a new key. We’ll be talking about that in a subsequent video. Specific to PCI Requirement 3.6.1, you have to have a process in place where you’re actually generating strong keys. IF you have an HSM, that’s kind of inherent in using the HSM itself. If you have a clear text process where you’re managing or developing these keys, it needs to be done securely. I would recommend that you look at industry best practices like NIST 800-57 for that information. Stay Connected Twitter: https://twitter.com/KPAudit LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/kirkpatrickprice-llc Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/kirkpatrickprice/ More Free Resources PCI Demystified: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/pci-demystified/ Blog: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/blog/ Webinars: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/webinars/ Videos: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/video/ White Papers: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/white-papers/ About Us KirkpatrickPrice is a licensed CPA firm, PCI QSA, and a HITRUST CSF Assessor, registered with the PCAOB, providing assurance services to over 600 clients in more than 48 states, Canada, Asia, and Europe. The firm has over 12 years of experience in information security and compliance assurance by performing assessments, audits, and tests that strengthen information security and internal controls. KirkpatrickPrice most commonly provides advice on SOC 1, SOC 2, HIPAA, HITRUST CSF, PCI DSS, ISO 27001, FISMA, and CFPB frameworks. For more about KirkpatrickPrice: https://kirkpatrickprice.com/ Contact us today: 800-770-2701 https://kirkpatrickprice.com/contact/
Views: 103 KirkpatrickPrice
What is ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY mean? ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning
 
03:31
What is ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY mean? ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning - ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY definition - ID-BASED CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Identity-based cryptography is a type of public-key cryptography in which a publicly known string representing an individual or organization is used as a public key. The public string could include an email address, domain name, or a physical IP address. The first implementation of identity-based signatures and an email-address based public-key infrastructure (PKI) was developed by Adi Shamir in 1984, which allowed users to verify digital signatures using only public information such as the user's identifier. Under Shamir's scheme, a trusted third party would deliver the private key to the user after verification of the user's identity, with verification essentially the same as that required for issuing a certificate in a typical PKI. Shamir similarly proposed identity-based encryption, which appeared particularly attractive since there was no need to acquire an identity's public key prior to encryption. However, he was unable to come up with a concrete solution, and identity-based encryption remained an open problem for many years. The first practical implementations were finally devised by Sakai in 2000, and Boneh and Franklin in 2001. These solutions were based on bilinear pairings. Also in 2001, a solution was developed independently by Clifford Cocks. Identity-based systems allow any party to generate a public key from a known identity value such as an ASCII string. A trusted third party, called the private key generator (PKG), generates the corresponding private keys. To operate, the PKG first publishes a master public key, and retains the corresponding master private key (referred to as master key). Given the master public key, any party can compute a public key corresponding to the identity ID by combining the master public key with the identity value. To obtain a corresponding private key, the party authorized to use the identity ID contacts the PKG, which uses the master private key to generate the private key for identity ID. Identity-based systems have a characteristic problem in operation. Suppose Alice and Bob are users of such a system. Since the information needed to find Alice's public key is completely determined by Alice's ID and the master public key, it is not possible to revoke Alice's credentials and issue new credentials without either (a) changing Alice's ID (usually a phone number or an email address which will appear in a corporate directory); or (b) changing the master public key and re-issusing private keys to all users, including Bob. This limitation may be overcome by including a time component (e.g. the current month) in the identity.
Views: 107 The Audiopedia
22. Cryptography: Encryption
 
01:24:15
MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas continues with cryptography, introducing encryption methods. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 14604 MIT OpenCourseWare
Dash: QT Wallet TestNet Guide = G15E19
 
08:08
Dash: QT Wallet TestNet Guide This tutorial will help you run the latest Dash-qt client on Test-net. This video is mean't for Linux but can be used for Windows/Mac as well. You will just need to locate your dash.conf in the Dash Data directory. What is TestNet ? https://en.bitcoin.it/wiki/Testnet Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 411 Dash
Dash: QT Wallet How to buy/ Shapeshift = G16E15
 
05:13
Dash: QT Wallet How to buy/ Shapeshift Shapeshift Online Exchange: https://shapeshift.io Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 291 Dash
Dash: The Bitcoin Address: A. M Antonopoulos 'What Bitcoin Means For Unbanked Economies = M14E02'
 
01:35:52
The Bitcoin Address: Andreas M Antonopoulos 'What Bitcoin Means For Unbanked Economies' Nov 2014 A.A. mentions DRK 48 min 18 sec Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 21421 Dash
How Bitcoin Works Under the Hood
 
22:25
A somewhat technical explanation of how Bitcoin works. Want more? Check out my new in-depth course on the latest in Bitcoin, Blockchain, and a survey of the most exciting projects coming out (Ethereum, etc): https://app.pluralsight.com/library/courses/bitcoin-decentralized-technology Lots of demos on how to buy, send, store (hardware, paper wallet). how to use javascript to send bitcoin. How to create Ethereum Smart Contract, much more. Shorter 5 min introduction: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t5JGQXCTe3c Written version: http://www.imponderablethings.com/2013/07/how-bitcoin-works-under-hood.html My Bitcoin address: 13v8NB9ScRa21JDi86GmnZ5d8Z4CjhZMEd Arabic translation by Ahmad Alloush Spanish caption translation by Borja Rodrigo, [email protected], DFJWgXdBCoQqo4noF4fyVhVp8R6V62XdJx Russian caption translation by Alexandra Miklyukova Italian voice over: http://youtu.be/1aEf3qr7UdE Italian captions translated by Simone Falcini, 1H5KdCnBooxfqpXtyQBBAKKRU7MkCZCVCe
Views: 2599698 CuriousInventor
MLTalks: Neal Stephenson
 
01:26:40
Award-winning sci-fi author Neal Stephenson, who is also the chief futurist at Magic Leap, in conversation with Ariel Ekblaw, founder and lead of the Media Lab's Space Exploration Initiative, and Joe Paradiso, head of the Responsive Environments research group. #MLTalks More information at:https://www.media.mit.edu/events/mltalks-stephenson/ License: CC-BY-4.0 (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/)
Views: 3183 MIT Media Lab
Dash: What is Dash? = P16E03
 
01:48
Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 1211 Dash
Glen Weyl: "Radical Markets: Uprooting Capitalism & Democracy for a Just Society" | Talks at Google
 
52:52
Many blame today's economic inequality, stagnation, and political instability on the free market. The solution is to rein in the market, right? Radical Markets turns this thinking — and pretty much all conventional thinking about markets, both for and against — on its head. The book reveals bold new ways to organize markets for the good of everyone. It shows how the emancipatory force of genuinely open, free, and competitive markets can reawaken the dormant nineteenth-century spirit of liberal reform and lead to greater equality, prosperity, and cooperation. Eric Posner and Glen Weyl demonstrate why private property is inherently monopolistic, and how we would all be better off if private ownership were converted into a public auction for public benefit. They show how the principle of one person, one vote inhibits democracy, suggesting instead an ingenious way for voters to effectively influence the issues that matter most to them. They argue that every citizen of a host country should benefit from immigration—not just migrants and their capitalist employers. They propose leveraging antitrust laws to liberate markets from the grip of institutional investors and creating a data labor movement to force digital monopolies to compensate people for their electronic data. Only by radically expanding the scope of markets can we reduce inequality, restore robust economic growth, and resolve political conflicts. But to do that, we must replace our most sacred institutions with truly free and open competition—Radical Markets shows how. Moderated by Hal Varian. Get the book: https://goo.gl/kfASr6
Views: 3374 Talks at Google
DEF CON 22 - Dan Kaminsky - Secure Random by Default
 
01:38:53
Secure Random By Default Dan Kaminsky Chief Scientist, White Ops As a general rule in security, we have learned that the best way to achieve security is to enable it by default. However, across operating systems and languages, random number generation is always exposed via two separate and most assuredly unequal APIs -- insecure and default, and secure but obscure. Why not fix this? Why not make JavaScript and PHP and Java and Python and even libc rand() return strong entropy? What are the issues stopping us? Should we just shell back to /dev/urandom, or is there merit to userspace entropy gathering? How does fork() and virtualization impact the question? What of performance, and memory consumption, and headless machines? Turns out the above questions are not actually rhetorical. Just because a change might be a good idea doesn't mean it's a simple one. This will be a deep dive, but one that I believe will actually yield a fix for the repeated *real world* failures of random number generation systems. Dan Kaminsky has been a noted security researcher for over a decade, and has spent his career advising Fortune 500 companies such as Cisco, Avaya, and Microsoft.Dan spent three years working with Microsoft on their Vista, Server 2008, and Windows 7 releases. Dan is best known for his work finding a critical flaw in the Internet’s Domain Name System (DNS), and for leading what became the largest synchronized fix to the Internet’s infrastructure of all time. Of the seven Recovery Key Shareholders who possess the ability to restore the DNS root keys, Dan is the American representative. Dan is presently developing systems to reduce the cost and complexity of securing critical infrastructure.
Views: 24049 DEFCONConference
Dash: QT Wallet Encryption = G15E12
 
06:21
Dash: QT Wallet Encryption What is : https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325335 How to: https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=33325343 Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 260 Dash
DEFCON 20: No More Hooks: Detection of Code Integrity Attacks
 
48:16
Speakers: XENO KOVAH THE MITRE CORPORATION COREY KALLENBERG THE MITRE CORPORATION Hooking is the act of redirecting program control flow somewhere other than it would go by default. For instance code can be "inlined hooked" by rewriting instructions to unconditionally transfer to other code. Or code can be hooked by manipulating control flow data like function pointers (IAT, IDT, SSDT, return addresses on the stack, callback addresses in dynamically allocated objects, etc). Hooking as a technique is neutral, but it is often used by malicious software to monitor or hide information on a system. Memory integrity verification requires the ability to detect unexpected hooks which could be causing software to lie or be blinded to the true state of the system. But we don't want to make the same mistake that most security software makes, assuming that they can rely on some built in access control to keep malice at arms length. The history of exploits is the history of bypassing access control. We want to have a technique which can detect if we ourselves are being manipulated to lie even when the attacker is assumed to be at the same high privilege level as our software. We believe that such a goal can be achieved with the help of an academic technique known as software-based, or timing-based, remote attestation. This is a technique which does not require a hardware root of trust like a TPM in order to bootstrap an ephemeral dynamic root of trust for measurement. It does this by computing a randomized checksum over its own memory and other system state, to detect code or control flow integrity attacks. The self-checking software can still be forced to lie and report an unmodified system, but thanks to a special looping construction, code which causes it to lie will require extra instructions per loop. The extra instructions will be multiplied by the number of loops, causing a macroscopic, remotely-detectable, increase in the runtime vs. what's expected. So basically, an attacker can force our software to lie, but because there's a timing side-channel built into the computation, he can still be caught by taking too long to generate a convincing lie. We have independently implemented and confirmed the claims of past work, and furthermore showed that the timing discrepancy in the presence of a checksum-forging attacker is detectable not just for machines on the same ethernet segment, but over 10 links of our production LAN. Because of the results of other work in timing side-channel detection over internet-scale distances, we think this technique can be extended even further. But for now for longer distances, we use this same timing-based technique in concert with TPM as a trustworthy timer, so that network jitter is not an issue. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/defcon20_information To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/defcon20_videos Playlist DEFCON 20: http://bit.ly/defcon20_playlist
Views: 2397 Christiaan008
What is DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION? What does DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION mean?
 
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What is DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION? What does DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION mean? DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION meaning - DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION definition - DIRECT ANONYMOUS ATTESTATION explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. SUBSCRIBE to our Google Earth flights channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6UuCPh7GrXznZi0Hz2YQnQ Direct Anonymous Attestation (DAA) is a cryptographic primitive which enables remote authentication of a trusted computer whilst preserving privacy of the platform's user. The protocol has been adopted by the Trusted Computing Group (TCG) in the latest version of its Trusted Platform Module (TPM) specification to address privacy concerns (see also Loss of Internet anonymity). ISO/IEC 20008 specifies DAA, as well, and Intel's Enhanced Privacy ID (EPID) 2.0 implementation for microprocessors is available for licensing RAND-Z along with an open source SDK. In principle the privacy issue could be resolved using any standard signature scheme (or public key encryption) and a single key pair. Manufacturers would embed the private key into every TPM produced and the public key would be published as a certificate. Signatures produced by the TPM must have originated from the private key, by the nature of the technology, and since all TPMs use the same private key they are indistinguishable ensuring the user's privacy. This rather naive solution relies upon the assumption that there exists a global secret. One only needs to look at the precedent of Content Scramble System (CSS), an encryption system for DVDs, to see that this assumption is fundamentally flawed. Furthermore, this approach fails to realize a secondary goal: the ability to detect rogue TPMs. A rogue TPM is a TPM that has been compromised and had its secrets extracted. The solution first adopted by the TCG (TPM specification v1.1) required a trusted third-party, namely a privacy certificate authority (privacy CA). Each TPM has an embedded RSA key pair called an Endorsement Key (EK) which the privacy CA is assumed to know. In order to attest the TPM generates a second RSA key pair called an Attestation Identity Key (AIK). It sends the public AIK, signed by EK, to the privacy CA who checks its validity and issues a certificate for the AIK. (For this to work, either a) the privacy CA must know the TPM's public EK a priori, or b) the TPM's manufacturer must have provided an endorsement certificate.) The host/TPM is now able to authenticate itself with respect to the certificate. This approach permits two possibilities to detecting rogue TPMs: firstly the privacy CA should maintain a list of TPMs identified by their EK known to be rogue and reject requests from them, secondly if a privacy CA receives too many requests from a particular TPM it may reject them and blacklist the TPMs EK. The number of permitted requests should be subject to a risk management exercise. This solution is problematic since the privacy CA must take part in every transaction and thus must provide high availability whilst remaining secure. Furthermore, privacy requirements may be violated if the privacy CA and verifier collude. Although the latter issue can probably be resolved using blind signatures, the first remains. ....
Views: 246 The Audiopedia
Dash: Presentation Barcelona BTC Group - May 2015 = C15E01
 
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Dash Talk Barcelona BTC Group - May 26 2015 by Fernando Tx Aleix Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 879 Dash
Dash: QT Wallet How to use Instant Transactions = G15E16
 
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Dash: QT Wallet How to use Instant Transactions Instant Transactions: https://dashpay.atlassian.net/wiki/display/DOC/InstantX Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 381 Dash
What is Bitcoin in 2018 in Urdu Hindi - Bitcoin Explained - بٹ کوائن کیا ہے
 
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Ar Official - What is Bitcoin in 2018 in Urdu Hindi - Bitcoin Explained - بٹ کوائن کیا ہے Bitcoin is a cryptocurrency and worldwide payment system.is the first decentralized digital currency, as the system works without a central bank or single administrator.The network is peer-to-peer and transactions take place between users directly, without an intermediary. These transactions are verified by network nodes through the use of cryptography and recorded in a public distributed ledger called a blockchain. Bitcoin was invented by an unknown person or group of people under the name Satoshi Nakamoto and released as open-source software in 2009. Bitcoins are created as a reward for a process known as mining. They can be exchanged for other currencies,[12] products, and services. As of February 2015, over 100,000 merchants and vendors accepted bitcoin as payment.[13] Research produced by the University of Cambridge estimates that in 2017, there are 2.9 to 5.8 million unique users using a cryptocurrency wallet, most of them using bitcoin. The word bitcoin first occurred and was defined in the white paper[5] that was published on 31 October 2008.[15] It is a compound of the words bit and coin.The white paper frequently uses the shorter coin. There is no uniform convention for bitcoin capitalization. Some sources use Bitcoin, capitalized, to refer to the technology and network and bitcoin, lowercase, to refer to the unit of account.[17] The Wall Street Journal,The Chronicle of Higher Education, and the Oxford English Dictionary[16] advocate use of lowercase bitcoin in all cases, a convention followed throughout this article.The unit of account of the bitcoin system is bitcoin. As of 2014, ticker symbols used to represent bitcoin are BTC[a] and XBT.[b] Its Unicode character is ₿.[24]:2 Small amounts of bitcoin used as alternative units are millibitcoin (mBTC)[1] and satoshi. Named in homage to bitcoin's creator, a satoshi is the smallest amount within bitcoin representing 0.00000001 bitcoin, one hundred millionth of a bitcoin.[3] A millibitcoin equals 0.001 bitcoin, one thousandth of a bitcoin or 100,000 satoshis.[25] History n 18 August 2008, the domain name "bitcoin.org" was registered.[26] In November that year, a link to a paper authored by Satoshi Nakamoto titled Bitcoin: A Peer-to-Peer Electronic Cash System[5] was posted to a cryptography mailing list.[26] Nakamoto implemented the bitcoin software as open source code and released it in January 2009 on SourceForge.[27][28][11] The identity of Nakamoto remains unknown.[10] In January 2009, the bitcoin network came into existence after Satoshi Nakamoto mined the first ever block on the chain, known as the genesis block.[29][30] Embedded in the coinbase of this block was the following text: The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks.[11] This note has been interpreted as both a timestamp of the genesis date and a derisive comment on the instability caused by fractional-reserve banking.[31] One of the first supporters, adopters, and contributors to bitcoin was the receiver of the first bitcoin transaction, programmer Hal Finney. Finney downloaded the bitcoin software the day it was released, and received 10 bitcoins from Nakamoto in the world's first bitcoin transaction.[32][33] Other early supporters were Wei Dai, creator of bitcoin predecessor b-money, and Nick Szabo, creator of bitcoin predecessor bit gold.[34] In the early days, Nakamoto is estimated to have mined 1 million bitcoins.[35] In 2010, Nakamoto handed the network alert key and control of the Bitcoin Core code repository over to Gavin Andresen, who later became lead developer at the Bitcoin Foundation.[36][37] Nakamoto subsequently disappeared from any involvement in bitcoin.[38] Andresen stated he then sought to decentralize control, saying: "As soon as Satoshi stepped back and threw the project onto my shoulders, one of the first things I did was try to decentralize that. So, if I get hit by a bus, it would be clear that the project would go on."[38] This left opportunity for controversy to develop over the future development path of bitcoin.[39] The value of the first bitcoin transactions were negotiated by individuals on the bitcointalk forums with one notable transaction of 10,000 BTC used to indirectly purchase two pizzas delivered by Papa John's.[29] On 6 August 2010, a major vulnerability in the bitcoin protocol was spotted. Transactions were not properly verified before they were included in the blockchain, which let users bypass bitcoin's economic restrictions and create an indefinite number of bitcoins.[40][41] On 15 August, the vulnerability was exploited; over 184 billion bitcoins were generated in a single transaction, and sent to two addresses on the network. Within hours, the transaction was spotted and erased from the transaction log after the bug was fixed and the network forked to an updated version of the bitcoin protocol]
Views: 53 AR Official
28C3: Electronic money: The road to Bitcoin and a glimpse forward (en)
 
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For more information visit: http://bit.ly/28C3_information To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/28C3_videos Playlist 28C3: http://bit.ly/28C3_playlist Speaker: Peio Popov How the e-money systems can be made better The proposed talk provides a definition of the problem of creating e-money and after a review of the state of the art points out possible solutions and proposes questions for discussion for the properties of electronic money system. Electronic money: The road to Bitcoin and a glimpse ahead Abstract: The proposed talk provides a definition of the problem of creating e-money and after a review of the state of the art points out possible solutions and proposes questions for discussion for the properties of electronic money system. 1. What is electronic money and different means of currency Definition of electronic money and distinction from similar means of exchange. Electronic money is defined as monetary value which is: stored on an electronic device; issued on receipt of funds; and accepted as a means of payment by persons other than the issuer. Working e-money examples: PayPal and MoneyBookers Other means of exchange, similar to e-money: Alternative/Social/Timeshare/Community currencies; Loyalty and Voucher systems. Working examples: WIR and Ven currencies (Bitcoin) What makes them different from e-money? (convertible only one-way, not a legal tender, mostly backed by trust only, etc) Optional: Pros and cons of the abovementioned means of exchange. 2. Defining the e-money problem: What electronic money should do? Risks and requirements to the solution for electronic money from technical, legal and business standpoint. The basic human problem of reaching a consensus and trust in a group. General system risks: Credit Liability Credit Abuse Counterfeiting Unauthorized Withdrawal Purchase Order Modification Double Spending Failure to Credit Payment Denial of Service Repudiation Failure to deliver Framing Secrecy Legal and accounting: Dispute resolution Money laundering and finance of terrorism Tax evasion prevention Consumer protection requirements Ways to negotiate and conclude a contract Auditability Reverse and chargeback transactions How the burden of proof is distributed Business: Costs for: Registration Operation Support Marketing Customer and merchant negotiation Accent on the most important human problems: Identification and authorization (which is the required minimum?) Achieving consensus and easy dispute resolution in a group. Determine the state of the system at any given moment Trust (between the peer users or trust in the central authority) 3. How the risks and requirements have been traditionally addressed? Review of the cryptographic, legal and procedural methods from the existing e-money protocols. Еmphasis on anonymity and privacy problems. The review of the existing systems will be a distinction between: Online and offline systems Example: PayPal and Blind signature/PayWord based systems Centralized and decentralized systems Example: Liberty Reserve and Ripple/BitCoin Hard and Soft systems Example: BitCoin and Credit card based money and payment protocols How do they solve the problems of trust and consensus in a certain group? How they provide anonymous transactions and keep user privacy? Are independent jurisdictions a (contribution to) the solution? Calculated risk, insurance and responsibility/role delegation as patches to the existing problems. Which of the above systems may be deemed "legal"? (what do the central banks think) Optional: Few words for Blind signature and PayWord techniques and the protocols around them 4. The great step forward. The contribution of Bitcoin Emphasis on decentralization and (relative) anonymity features of Bitcoin. How the combination of a way to create(mint) coins and to timestamp the state of their distribtion created the first working non-centralised currency. What, in my opinion, contributed for the Bitcoin popularity. 5. The problems of Bitcoin What Bitcoin doesn't provide or doesn't provide in an effective manner: Cost of creating money Method of reaching a consensus, based on computing power No "real value" to back it Settlement risk not covered Scalability issues All the lacking features of a "soft" currency Is it decentralized or distributed system? (having in mind the introduction of "trust points") 6. A Glimpse forward How can anonymous e-money be made better (more effective and accessible). Proposal (and discussion) of the possible enchancements. How to issue e-money in more effective manner?
Views: 1057 Christiaan008
Accountable Algorithms
 
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Important decisions about people are increasingly made by algorithms: Votes are counted; voter rolls are purged; financial aid decisions are made; taxpayers are chosen for audits; air travelers are selected for enhanced search; credit eligibility decisions are made. Citizens, and society as a whole, have an interest in making these processes more transparent. Yet the full basis for these decisions is rarely available to affected people: the algorithm or some inputs may be secret; or the implementation may be secret; or the process may not be precisely described. A person who suspects the process went wrong has little recourse. And an oversight authority who wants to ensure that decisions are made according to an acceptable policy has little assurance that proffered decision rules match decisions for actual users. I challenge the dominant position in the legal literature that transparency will solve these problems. Disclosures of source code and the underlying data are often neither necessary (because evidence can be provided in other convincing ways, as I will show) nor sufficient (because of the issues analyzing code and machine learning models) to demonstrate the fairness of a process. Furthermore, transparency may be undesirable, such as when it discloses private information or permits tax cheats or terrorists to game the systems determining audits or security screening. Finally, transparency may not be useful, as in the case of a lottery. Traditionally, Computer Science addresses these problems by demanding a specification of the desired behavior, which can then be enforced or verified. But this model is poorly suited to real-world oversight tasks, where the specification might be complicated or might not be known in advance. For example, laws are often ambiguous precisely because it would be politically (and practically) infeasible to give a precise specification of their meaning. Instead, people do their best to approximate what they believe the law will allow and disputes about what is actually allowed happen after-the-fact via expensive investigation and adjudication (e.g. in a court or legislature). As a result, actual oversight, in which real decisions are reviewed for their correctness, fairness, or faithfulness to a rule happens only rarely, if at all. I present a novel approach to relating the tools of technology to the problem of overseeing decision making processes. These methods use the tools of computer science to ensure cryptographically the technical properties that can be proven, while providing the necessary evidence so that a political, legal, or social oversight process can operate effectively. Further, evidence produced by these methods can help the subjects of decisions to trust the integrity and fairness of the decision process. Specifically, these accountable algorithms make use of a novel zero-knowledge commit-and-prove protocol to produce evidence that supports meaningful after-the-fact oversight, consistent with the norm in law and policy. Accountable algorithms can attest to the valid operation of a decision policy even when all or part of that policy is kept secret. See more on this video at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/accountable-algorithms/
Views: 379 Microsoft Research
Dash: QT Wallet How to buy/ Poloniex = G16E14
 
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Dash: QT Wallet How to buy/ Poloniex Poloniex Online Exchange: https://www.poloniex.com Tipping Address: Xovo9BEAN3sKwxAAt5Knqdo1gqhodnzNu7 Dash is DigitalCash Dash is a decentralized cryptographic currency that works similar to Bitcoin, but fixes many of Bitcoin's problems. Dash's InstantX technology makes transactions almost instant, meaning it is suitable for in-person trades and point-of-sale purchases. Not only that, but Dash is truly private, meaning that nobody can mine the blockchain to find details of your purchases or financial history. You wouldn't advertise your credit card statement--why advertise your crypto purchases? Dash is built from Bitcoin's core code, meaning that it remains compatible with systems that are already designed to work with Bitcoin. The creator of Dash, Evan Duffield, works with a "core team" of almost 20 people to continually improve the Dash code and ecosystem. Since Dash implemented its self-funding mechanism, a number of new developers have begun working on various aspects of the project as well, including retail point-of-sale and vending machine integration. Dash's masternodes enable investors to earn a 10+% annual return on investment while performing vital services for the network. Masternodes power both the privacy and instant transaction features of Dash. Not only that, but masternode owners are able to vote on which projects will receive Dash's monthly self-generated budget funding. Dash's budget system provides tens of thousands of dollars in recurring funds, every month, which masternode owners allocate to projects designed to improve the Dash ecosystem. https://www.dash.org
Views: 808 Dash
Penetration Testing Custom TLS Stacks [ShmooCon 2016]
 
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With the ever growing number of attacks against SSL/TLS, quick turnaround time is required to write proof of concept code to test new attacks. Extending existing TLS stacks to implement such code is difficult and error prone. Due to that need, we developed an offensive focused TLS stack which allows to quickly prototype attacks against all elements of the stack (protocol, crypto, certificates, …) scapy-ssl_tls is an offensive TLS stack which lives above scapy. I will demonstrate how to look for protocol and crypto related flaws in custom TLS stacks, and how to quickly build prototypes. Alex Moneger enjoys working on security which relates to bits and bytes such as cryptography, exploit development, fuzzing and binary instrumentation. He has presented at several security conferences (Defcon, Nuit Du Hack, Seccon) on the above topics. Overall, his interests in security topics are too broad for the time he has available. He also writes (numstitch, fuzzmon) and contributes to open-source security tools (scapy-ssl_tls, afl, …). In his day job, he works for Citrix Systems, taking care of product security.
Views: 152 Michail S