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ELISA Tutorial 5: Preparing ELISA Data in Excel for Analysis with GraphPad Prism
 
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Here, we demonstrate the first steps of data analysis for some typical ELISA data. The procedure shown is as follows: 1) Compare the arrangement of our samples on the 96-well plate with the absorbance measurements obtained from the plate reader. 2) Subtract out the blank measurements from all the entire plate. 3) Arrange the absorbance measurements of the standards next to their corresponding known concentrations. 4) Place the absorbance measurements of the samples below the absorbance measurements of the standards. In the next video of this series, we will demonstrate how to interpolate the concentration of our samples using software called GraphPad Prism. Click here for a free 30-day trial of GraphPad Prism - http://protocol-place.com/Prism This video and other protocols can be found at our website, the "Protocol Place" - http://protocol-place.com/ A full ELISA protocol can be found at http://protocol-place.com/assays/sandwich-elisa-protocol/ This video is a part of our ELISA Tutorial Series. Here are all of the videos in this series: ELISA Tutorial 1: Understand How an ELISA Works - http://youtu.be/nNjlBCnpGZ4 ELISA Tutorial 2: Coating and Blocking the ELISA Plate - http://youtu.be/AmG7FBolfdc ELISA Tutorial 3: Preparing and Adding Samples to the ELISA Plate - http://youtu.be/darrx6F0wsg ELISA Tutorial 4: Finishing the Assay (Sandwich ELISA) - http://youtu.be/zI4khIJhCd8 ELISA Tutorial 5: Preparing ELISA Data in Excel for Analysis with GraphPad Prism - http://youtu.be/l9tO81ZCeRg ELISA Tutorial 6: How to Analyze ELISA Data with GraphPad Prism - http://youtu.be/5IqqpKSnXfI Competitive ELISA Tutorial 1: How a Competitive ELISA Works - http://youtu.be/Kb26nQVMHds Competitive ELISA Tutorial 2: How to Use Calbiotech's Competitive ELISA Kits - http://youtu.be/3E_U_4Z2dUc Competitive ELISA Tutorial 3: Analyzing Typical ELISA Data in Excel - http://youtu.be/s2t0jiWxiDI We hope you enjoy watching and benefit from our tutorials. If so, please take a minute to "like," or better yet, share them with others! Thanks for watching! Youssef Farhat Protocol Place: http://protocol-place.com ***Check out some of our other tutorials via the links below*** Competitive ELISA Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kb26nQVMHds&list=PLR4wfoQ4HbymisBtft-i-QTsyRDMFymC3 ELISA Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNjlBCnpGZ4&list=PLR4wfoQ4HbynbS01zeuBV-awsOAxDPhYO Gelatin Zymography Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MF2sWQSaBWg&list=PLR4wfoQ4Hbykrj7rxk6i5jzkjtvTtZUVx
Views: 48125 protocolplace
TCID50 Preparation
 
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This video was prepared by the Teaching Support team for The University of Western Australia's School of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine (PaLM). Credits: Actors: Melissa Andrade Voice-over: Sarah Power
Views: 9139 Biomedical Science
Assay of viral infectivity
 
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'Assay of viral infectivity' is video 2 from week 2 of my 2013 Coursera course 'How viruses work'.
Views: 8716 Vincent Racaniello
Antibody test (quantitative tests)
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Source of all articles published in description is Wikipedia. Thanks to original content developers. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page This video tutorial talks about different immunological assays and antibody test methods and their importance in clinical biology. It also explains different features of antigen antibody reactions and their role in identifying diseases.
Views: 14347 Shomu's Biology
ELISA
 
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ELISA Readersare laboratory instruments designed to detect biological, chemical or physical events of samples in micro-titer plates. It is a specialized spectrophotometer that is used to determine the absorbance of a large number of samples within a short time. The two types of optics used in ELISA Reader are filter based and mono-chromator based optics. The optical system uses optic fibres to supply light to the micro-plate wells containing the samples.The light beam, passing through the sample has a diameter ranging between 1 to 3 mm.Detection system detects the light coming from the sample.Amplifiers are used to amplify the signal and determine the sample's absorbance. Reading system converts it into data allowing the test result interpretation. It isused for reading the results of ELISA tests, has direct application in immunology and serology. It also confirms the presence of antibodies or antigens of an infectious agent in an organism and detects antibodies from a vaccine or auto-antibodies. Here we have used it for the assay of free phosphorus in maize sample.
Views: 1029 Genomics Lab
Microplate Reader Data and Elisa Data Analysis Does Not Get Any Easier
 
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The goal of creating this video demo is to demonstrate how quick and easy it is to do curve-fitting quantitative analysis on microplate reader data or elisa data with MasterPlex ReaderFit by Hitachi Software MiraiBio Group. The video is in real-time without any fast-forwarding or fancy editing so users can get a sense of the real experience. The input file used is a simple Excel table with my raw RLU values. Fasten your seatbelts. Were going to get from raw data to calculated concentrations in less than 2 minutes!
Views: 15876 aliumiraibio
ELISA Tutorial 6: How to Analyze ELISA Data with GraphPad Prism
 
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Here, we demonstrate how to analyze some typical ELISA using software called GraphPad Prism. This software allows us to effortlessly fit a curve to our standards, and then use that curve to interpolate the concentration of our samples. If you do not already have GraphPad Prism, you can download a free 30-day trial here: http://protocol-place.com/Prism This video and other protocols can be found at our website, the "Protocol Place" - http://protocol-place.com/ A full ELISA protocol can be found at http://protocol-place.com/assays/sandwich-elisa-protocol/ This video is a part of our ELISA Tutorial Series. Here are all of the videos in this series: ELISA Tutorial 1: Understand How an ELISA Works - http://youtu.be/nNjlBCnpGZ4 ELISA Tutorial 2: Coating and Blocking the ELISA Plate - http://youtu.be/AmG7FBolfdc ELISA Tutorial 3: Preparing and Adding Samples to the ELISA Plate - http://youtu.be/darrx6F0wsg ELISA Tutorial 4: Finishing the Assay (Sandwich ELISA) - http://youtu.be/zI4khIJhCd8 ELISA Tutorial 5: Preparing ELISA Data in Excel for Analysis with GraphPad Prism - http://youtu.be/l9tO81ZCeRg ELISA Tutorial 6: How to Analyze ELISA Data with GraphPad Prism - http://youtu.be/5IqqpKSnXfI Competitive ELISA Tutorial 1: How a Competitive ELISA Works - http://youtu.be/Kb26nQVMHds Competitive ELISA Tutorial 2: How to Use Calbiotech's Competitive ELISA Kits - http://youtu.be/3E_U_4Z2dUc Competitive ELISA Tutorial 3: Analyzing Typical ELISA Data in Excel - http://youtu.be/s2t0jiWxiDI We hope you enjoy watching and benefit from our tutorials. If so, please take a minute to "like," or better yet, share them with others! Thanks for watching! Youssef Farhat Protocol Place: http://protocol-place.com ***Check out some of our other tutorials via the links below*** Competitive ELISA Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kb26nQVMHds&list=PLR4wfoQ4HbymisBtft-i-QTsyRDMFymC3 ELISA Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nNjlBCnpGZ4&list=PLR4wfoQ4HbynbS01zeuBV-awsOAxDPhYO Gelatin Zymography Tutorials - - - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MF2sWQSaBWg&list=PLR4wfoQ4Hbykrj7rxk6i5jzkjtvTtZUVx
Views: 56622 protocolplace
Virus Watch: Counting Viruses
 
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In this episode of Virus Watch, I show how to do my favorite assay in all of virology - the plaque assay.
Views: 14706 Vincent Racaniello
ELISA data calculation - Excel
 
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Not a complete calculation
Views: 1012 jontrip247
Microtiter plate
 
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A microtiter plate or microplate or microwell plate or multiwell, is a flat plate with multiple "wells" used as small test tubes. The microplate has become a standard tool in analytical research and clinical diagnostic testing laboratories. A very common usage is in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, the basis of most modern medical diagnostic testing in humans and animals. A microplate typically has 6, 24, 96, 384 or even 1536 sample wells arranged in a 2:3 rectangular matrix. Some microplates have even been manufactured with 3456 or even 9600 wells, and an "array tape" product has been developed that provides a continuous strip of microplates embossed on a flexible plastic tape. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1019 Audiopedia
ELISA Analysis Plate Layout Software Demostration
 
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http://www.elisaanalysis.com provides free ELISA software for ELISA data analysis. This video is a demonstration of how easy it is to create a plate layout for your ELISA kit using the elisaanalysis.com ELISA software.
Views: 3305 ElisaAnalysis
The plaque assay
 
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Dr. Edward Hutchinson explains how influenza A virus titres can be measured using a plaque assay.
Microplate
 
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EN: In this 'Favourite Things' video our director Thomas addresses his own fascination with the microplate, the present day successor of the test tube. DA: I denne 'Favourite Things'-film fortæller og undrer vores museumschef Thomas sig over sin egen fascination af microplaten, nutidens udgave af reagensglasset.
Views: 750 Medical Museion
Serial dilution
 
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This general microbiology practical lecture explains the serial dilution techniques in pour plate method to isolate bacteria. For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Question source - www.indiabix.com
Views: 214183 Shomu's Biology
elisa hbsag
 
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Views: 2563 wyney Bill
Hemagglutination assay
 
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For more information, log on to- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/ Download the study materials here- http://shomusbiology.weebly.com/bio-materials.html Source of all articles published in description is Wikipedia. Thanks to original content developers. Link- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Main_Page The hemagglutination assay (or haemagglutination assay; HA) is a method of quantification for viruses or bacteria by hemagglutination. It is an easy, simple and rapid method which can be applied to large numbers of samples. The hemagglutination assay and its extension, the hemagglutination inhibition assay, were invented in 1941--42 by American virologist George Hirst.[1][2] The hemagglutination assay of a virus, in contrast to other forms of virus quantification such as a plaque assay or 50% Tissue Culture Infective Dose, does not give any measure of viral infectivity, because no virus replication is required in this assay. The same may not be true when using HA for bacteria. The detailed conditions depend on the type of virus or bacteria being assayed since certain pH values and ionic strengths can impact the activity of the proteins of interest in a difficult to predict manner. Normally, a virus dilution (e.g. 2-fold from 1:4 to 1:4096) will be applied to an RBC dilution (e.g. 0.1% to 0.7% in steps of 0.2%) for approx. 30 min, often at 4 °C, otherwise viruses with neuraminidase activity will detach the virus from the RBCs. Then the lattice forming parts will be counted and the titer calculated. Virus concentration in virions per millilitre = 107 x HA titer.[3] The titer of a hemagglutination assay is determined by the last viable "lattice" structure found. This is because it is at the point where, if diluted anymore, the amount of Virus particles will be less than that of the RBCs and thus not be able to agglutinate them together. For bacteria, depending on species, a bacterial dilution will be applied to an equal part RBC dilution and then incubated for 30 min to an hour at an optimal growth temperature before being observed.[4]
Views: 57487 Shomu's Biology
Serial Dilution by Column on a 96-Well Microplate
 
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Apricot Designs 96-channel pipettor configured with a 8-channel head for automatic column-by-column serial dilution.
Views: 19589 ApricotDesigns
Introduction cultivation of microorganisms and animal cells in microplates (by Wouter Duetz)
 
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Cultivation in microtiter plates (microplates) of bacteria (E. coli, Bacillus, etc.), streptomycetes, fungi and animal cells (e.g. CHO cells), using the technology platform (sandwich covers, clamp systems, orbital shakers) as originally developped by Wouter Duetz and his research group at the Institute of Biotechnology of the ETH Zurich from 1997-2002.
Views: 7097 wouterduetz
John Schiller (NCI at NIH) 2: Why Do HPV Virus-Like Particle Vaccines Work So Well?
 
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https://www.ibiology.org/human-disease/hpv/#part-2 John Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. Talk Overview: Human Papillomavirus (HPV) causes 5% of all cancers worldwide, and the first vaccine against HPV was approved in 2006. In this seminar, Dr. John Schiller provides an overview of HPV virus and infection, compares the three FDA approved vaccines against HPV, and explains the endpoints used in the clinical trials to prove vaccine efficacy. After a decade of using the vaccine, retrospective studies now allow us to evaluate the possibility of using single-dose vaccination, which could lead to an increase in the general use of the vaccine (implementation), and improve HPV-related cancer prevention. In his second seminar, Schiller discusses the high efficacy of HPV vaccine, which is exceptionally good at producing neutralizing antibodies and also benefits from the low mutation rate of HPV. Coming to a better understanding of the efficacy of the HPV vaccine will provide evidence to support single-dose vaccination and aids in the development of new vaccines. Speaker Biography: Dr. John Schiller is a National Institute of Health (NIH) distinguished investigator and a professor at the National Cancer Institute at the NIH. Schiller completed his bachelor’s degree in molecular biology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison (1975), and received a doctorate degree in Microbiology at the University of Washington in Seattle (1982). Schiller continued his training at the Laboratory of Cellular Oncology as a National Research Service Award postdoctoral fellow. He became a senior investigator in 1986, and in 2016 he was designated as an NIH Distinguished Investigator. For his scientific contributions, Schiller received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation (2012), the American Society for Microbiology’s Joseph Public Health Award (2017), and the Lasker-DeBakey Clinical Medical Research Award (2017). Learn more about Schiller’s research at his lab website: https://ccr.cancer.gov/Laboratory-of-Cellular-Oncology/john-t-schiller
Views: 888 iBiology
Spotlight on Testing: Phospholipase A2 Receptor (PLA2R) IgG Antibody
 
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Our ARUP Institute for Learning Spotlight Series is designed to provide brief educational overviews highlighting test utilization issues, new tests, and testing technology. In this video, Anne Tebo, PhD discusses the Importance of Phospholipase A2 Receptor (PLA2R) IgG Antibody: A Marker for Primary Membranous Nephropathy.
Views: 576 ARUP Laboratories
Microtiter plate
 
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Fully automated packaging line for pharmaceutical microtiter plates with inline inspection systems and connected to injection moulding machine
Views: 1612 GDO B.V.
TRACO 2017: Lymphoma and Small molecules
 
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TRACO 2017: Lymphoma and Small molecules Air date: Tuesday, October 17, 2017, 4:00:00 PM Category: TRACO Runtime: 01:48:16 Description: Translational Research in Clinical Oncology (TRACO) Recent advances in understanding cancer biology are beginning to be translated into improvements in diagnosis and treatment of cancer. In the post-genome era, we increasingly rely on strong collaboration between basic and clinical scientists to develop novel approaches for treatment of human disease. The NCI Center for Cancer Research (CCR) is one of the largest cancer research organizations in the world, with more than 200 principal investigators, and has played a major role in developing and implementing many new technologies, such as nanotechnology, next generation sequencing, genomics and proteomics. For more information go to http://ccr.cancer.gov/training/trainee-resources/courses-workshops/traco Author: John T. Schiller, Ph.D., CCR, NCI, NIH and Anton Simeonov, Ph.D., NCATS, NIH Permanent link: https://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?23523
Views: 370 nihvcast
Bioassays | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Assay 00:03:17 1 Etymology 00:04:34 2 General steps 00:09:01 3 Assay types based on the nature of the assay process 00:09:13 3.1 Time and number of measurements taken 00:10:08 3.2 Number of analytes detected 00:10:54 3.3 Result type 00:12:53 3.4 Sample type and method 00:13:55 3.5 Signal amplification 00:15:17 3.6 Detection method or technology 00:17:51 4 Assay types based on the targets being measured 00:18:02 4.1 DNA 00:18:24 4.2 Protein 00:18:44 4.3 RNA 00:18:57 4.4 Cell counting, viability, proliferation or cytotoxicity assays 00:20:30 4.5 Environmental or Food Contaminants 00:20:45 4.6 Surfactants 00:21:01 4.7 Other cell assays 00:22:50 4.8 Petrochemistry 00:23:01 4.9 Virology 00:23:41 4.10 Cellular secretions 00:24:08 4.11 Drugs 00:24:22 5 Quality 00:26:07 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8922787130453592 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= An assay is an investigative (analytic) procedure in laboratory medicine, pharmacology, environmental biology and molecular biology for qualitatively assessing or quantitatively measuring the presence, amount, or functional activity of a target entity (the analyte). The analyte can be a drug, a biochemical substance, or a cell in an organism or organic sample. The measured entity is generally called the analyte, the measurand or the target of the assay. The assay usually aims to measure an intensive property of the analyte and express it in the relevant measurement unit (e.g. molarity, density, functional activity in enzyme international units, degree of some effect in comparison to a standard, etc.). If the assay involves addition of exogenous reactants (the reagents), then their quantities are kept fixed (or in excess) so that the quantity (and quality) of the target is the only limiting factor for the reaction/assay process, and the difference in the assay outcome is used to deduce the unknown quality or quantity of the target in question. Some assays (e.g., biochemical assays) may be similar to or have overlap with chemical analysis and titration. But generally, assays involve biological material or phenomena which tend to be intrinsically more complex either in composition or in behavior or both. Thus reading of an assay may be quite noisy and may involve greater difficulties in interpretation than an accurate chemical titration. On the other hand, older generation qualitative assays, especially bioassays, may be much more gross and less quantitative (e.g., counting death or dysfunction of an organism or cells in a population, or some descriptive change in some body part of a group of animals). Assays have become a routine part of modern medical, environmental, pharmaceutical, forensic and many other businesses at various scales from industrial to curbside or field level. Those assays that are very highly commercially demanded have been well investigated in research and development sectors of professional industries, undergone generations of development and sophistication, and in some cases are protected by the regulation of the use of Intellectual property such as patents granted for inventions or various regulatory incentives and exclusive rights. Such industrial scale assays as these are often done in well equipped laboratories and with automated organization of the procedure—from ordering an assay to pre-analytic sample processing (sample collection, necessary manipulations e.g. spinning for separation or other processes, aliquoting if necessary, storage, retrieval, pipetting/aspiration etc.). Analytes are generally tested in high throughput AutoAnalyzers, and the results are verified and automatically returned to ordering service providers and end users. These are made possible through use of advanced Laboratory informatics system that interfaces with multiple computer terminals with end users, central ...
Views: 6 wikipedia tts
Vaccines for Lyme Disease - Past, Present, and Future
 
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A Lyme disease vaccine is no longer available. The vaccine manufacturer discontinued production in 2002, citing insufficient consumer demand. This webinar contains presentations that describe the need for a new Lyme disease vaccine; the types of vaccines that are under investigation; and why the previous Lyme disease vaccine failed. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at http://www.cdc.gov/lyme/resources/PW4086633.wmv
June 2017 ACIP Meeting - Hepatitis Vaccines
 
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Hepatitis A vaccine background, Cost-effectiveness analysis of catch-up hepatitis A vaccination among unvaccinated/partially-vaccinated children, Updated ACIP routine recommendations for use of hepatitis A vaccine, Updated ACIP recommendations for use of hepatitis A vaccine and immune globulin for post-exposure prophylaxis and for international travelers Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/videos/low-res/ACIPJune2017/Hepatitis_Vaccines_LowRes.mp4
Tick-Borne Disease Working Group Meeting - May 10, 2018
 
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Part 1 (Welcome, Introductions, Overview) - https://bit.ly/2ydmepe Part 2 (Disease Vectors, Surveillance, and Prevention Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2Nq6UeC Part 3 (Pathogenesis, Transmission, and Treatment Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2NqoNdo Part 4 (Testing and Diagnostics Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2NpTL57 Part 5 (Access to Care and Support to Patients Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2P9BsCV Part 6 (Vaccines and Therapeutics Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2O6v5nu Part 7 (Other Tick-Borne Diseases and Co-Infections Subcommittee Report) - https://bit.ly/2CuhQqD Part 8 (Public Comments and Next Steps) - https://bit.ly/2OGKLgM -- U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) http://www.hhs.gov HHS Privacy Policy http://www.hhs.gov/Privacy.html

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