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Intermolecular Forces - Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole-Dipole, Ion-Dipole, London Dispersion Interactions
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on intermolecular forces such hydrogen bonding, ion-ion interactions, dipole dipole, ion dipole, london dispersion forces and van deer waal forces. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help you understand the most important concepts related to this material. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. Ion - Ion dipole interactions of KF and CaO 2. Electrostatic Force and Lattice Energy- The effect of charge and ionic radii or size 3. How To Determine Which Ionic Compound has a Higher Melting Point - NaF vs KCl 4. Ion-Dipole Interactions - NaCl and H2O 5. Definition of a Dipole - Polar Molecules & Charge Separation 6. Dipole-Dipole Interactions of Polar Molecules - Partial Charge Electrostatic Attractions of CO 7. Hydrogen Bonding between Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Oxygen, and Fluorine 8. Intermolecular Forces vs Intramolecular Forces 9. Hydrogen Bonding vs Polar & Nonpolar Covalent Bonds 10. London Dispersion Forces & Van Der Waals Forces 11. Permanent Dipoles and Temporary Induced Dipoles - Distribution of electrons in electron cloud 12. Difference Between Atoms and Ions - Cations vs Anions - Number of Electrons and Protons 13. The relationship between Polarizability and Dispersion Forces 14. How To Determine the Strongest Intermolecular Forces In Compounds Such as MgO, KCl, H2O, CH4, CO2, SO2, HF, CH3OH, LiCl, CH2O, CO, and I2 15. The relationship between Boiling Point and Vapor Pressure 16. Straight Chained vs Branched Alkanes - Boiling Point and Intermolecular Forces - Surface Area 17. Ranking Boiling Point In Order of Increasing Strength for I2, Br2, F2, and Cl2 18. Polar and Nonpolar Organic Compounds - Polarity and Water Solubility 19. Ranking Boiling In Decreasing Order For HF, HCl, HBr, and HI 20. The effect of Molar Mass and Number of electrons on the Overall Intermolecular Force / LDF
Intermolecular Forces and Boiling Points
 
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Why do different liquids boil at different temperatures? It has to do with how strongly the molecules interact with each other. Find out all the different ways, and how to use them to make predictions about matter! Subscribe: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveSubscribe [email protected] http://patreon.com/ProfessorDaveExplains http://professordaveexplains.com http://facebook.com/ProfessorDaveExpl... http://twitter.com/DaveExplains General Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveGenChem Organic Chemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveOrgChem Biochemistry Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBiochem Classical Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics1 Modern Physics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDavePhysics2 Mathematics Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveMaths Biology Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveBio American History Tutorials: http://bit.ly/ProfDaveAmericanHistory
Views: 461523 Professor Dave Explains
Intermolecular Forces
 
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Watch more videos on http://www.brightstorm.com/science/chemistry SUBSCRIBE FOR All OUR VIDEOS! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=brightstorm2 VISIT BRIGHTSTORM.com FOR TONS OF VIDEO TUTORIALS AND OTHER FEATURES! http://www.brightstorm.com/ LET'S CONNECT! Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/brightstorm Pinterest ► https://www.pinterest.com/brightstorm/ Google+ ► https://plus.google.com/+brightstorm/ Twitter ► https://twitter.com/brightstorm_ Brightstorm website ► https://www.brightstorm.com/
Views: 413870 Brightstorm
Identifying Intermolecular Forces 1
 
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Based on polarity of a molecule, identify the predominant intermolecular force in a molecule.
Views: 27723 Lori Maffe
How to Memorize The Polyatomic Ions, Formulas, Charges, Naming, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to memorize the polyatomic ions. It provides the name of the common polyatomic ions, the charges and their respective formulas as well. Common polyatomic ions include sulfate, nitrate, acetate, ammonium, hydroxide, sulfite, cyanide, phosphate, disulfide, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfate, bisulfite, chromate, dichromate, pyrophosphate, permanganate, thiosulfate, peroxide, superoxide, oxalate, borate, iodate, perchlorate, hypochlorite, bromite, and nitrite just to name a few. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems including a quiz that tests you to see if you remember the common polyatomic ions.
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: How To Tell If a Molecule is Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This video provides a fast way for you to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar. It provides examples so you can quickly distinguish nonpolar molecules from those that are polar. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of molecules that are classified as polar or nonpolar: N2, O2, Cl2, F2, H2 He, Ne, Ar, Xe CH4, C2H6, CH2=CH2, CF4, SBr6, BH3, CO2, PCl5, H2O, NH3, HF, CH3OH, CH3NH2, CH3COOH OCS, CH3F, SO2
General Chemistry Equations Sheet and List of Formulas Plus Concepts Part 1 - Study Guide Review
 
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This general chemistry video tutorial provides a list of equations or a formula cheat sheet that you need to know in order to do well in your chemistry course. This study guide video provides a nice review of the concepts that goes with each equation to help you for your upcoming final exam. Here is a list of topics: 1. How To Determine The Number of Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons Inside an atom or ion using the Atomic Number, Mass Number and Charge. 2. How To Calculate Average Atomic Mass and Relative Percent Abundance of Isotopes 3. How To Convert Grams To Moles - Stoichiometry 4. How To Determine The Molar Mass or Molecular Weight of a Compound 5. Avogadro's Number - Moles to Particles, Atoms, or Molecules 6. Mass Percent Formula - How To Determine The Percent Composition of an Element Within a Compound 7. The Equation For Density = Mass / Volume 8. Unit Conversions. 1 Kg = 1000g, 1L = 1000mL - Metric System Conversions 9. Fahrenheit, Celsius, and Kelvin Temperature Equation 10. Percent Yield, Actual Yield, and Theoretical Yield 11. Percent Error Formula 12. Dilution Equation - M1V1=M2V2 - Acid Base Titations - Concentration, Molarity and Volume 13. Solute, Solvent and Solution Relationship 14. How To Calculate The Molarity Using Moles of Solute and Liters of Solution 15. Ideal Gas Law Equation - PV=nRT 16. Combined Gas Law Formula - P1V1/T1=P2V2/T2 17. Boyle's Law - P1V1=P2V2 Inverse Relationship 18. Charles Law - V1/T1=V2/T2 Direct Graphical Relationship 19. Gay Lussac's Law - P1/T1=P2/T2 20. Avogadro's Law - V1/n1=V2/n2 21. Definition of Pressure - Force Divided By Area 22. Units of Pressure - torr, atom, Kpa, pa, and mm Hg 23. Gas Density and Molar Mass Formula Calculations 24. Graham's Law of Effusion - Rate of Effusion vs Molecular Weight 25. Root Mean Square Velocity Equation of Gases 26. units of R gas Constant - 0.08206 and 8.3145 27. Dalton's Law of Partial Pressure 28. Mole Fraction and Partial Pressures vs Vapor Pressure 29. STP - Standard Temperature and Pressure vs Molar Volume - 1 mole of gas = 22.4 L 30. Collected over Water Gas Law Problems - Vapor Pressure of Water 31. Average Kinetic Energy of Gases vs Temperature 32. Work Pressure Volume Equation - Work Done By the System vs On the System 33. Sign of W - Gas Compression vs Expansion 34. Q and Heat Transfer - Absorb vs Released - Endothermic vs Exothermic Processes 35. Q = mcT, Temperature Change and Specific Heat Capacity 36. Freezing, Melting, Vaporization, Condensation, Sublimation and Deposition Physical Processes - Phase Change 37. Heating and Cooling Curve - Kinetic Energy and Potential Energy vs Heat Absorbed 38. Internal Energy of System - Work and Heat Energy 39. Heat Transfer Problems - Metal in bucket of water - How To Calculate the Final Temperature of Mixture or The Unknown Specific Heat Capacity of the Metal 40. Enthalpy of Reaction Using Heats of Formation 41. Enthalpy of Reaction Using Bond Dissociation Energy 42. Finding Enthalpy Using Hess Law 43. Calculate delta H using Calorimetry or q/n 44. Heat of Fusion vs Heat of Vaporization 45. Electromagnetic Spectrum - Radio Waves, Microwaves, Infrared, Visible Light, Ultraviolet Light, X Rays and Gamma Rays 46. Frequency, Wavelength, Speed of Light and Energy of a photon 47. Energy levels, Electron Transition and Photon Absorption vs Emission 48. De broglie Wavelength Equation
Naming Compounds in Chemistry
 
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Naming Compounds in Chemistry. Learn how to easily name ionic and covalent compounds. Mr. Causey shows you step by step how to use the periodic table, a list of polyatomic ions and numeric prefixes to name ionic compounds and covalent compounds. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com SUBSCRIBE for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl ABOUT MR. CAUSEY'S VIDEO ACADEMY Mr. Causey's Video Academy is an educational video series of short video lessons for chemistry, algebra and physics. You can get lessons on a variety of topics or homework helpers that show you how to solve certain problems. There are over 100 videos to choose from. Non-metallic Roots - 1:34 Numeric Prefixes - 2:16 Metallic Ions - 2:35 Polyatomic Ions - 2:54 CONTACT ME: [email protected] FOLLOW ME: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544 https://plus.google.com/u/0/111105504415887392612 RESOURCES Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/2RaWe6L Periodic Table: RELATED VIDEOS: Valence Electrons: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ov2ZHo... Writing Chemical Formulas: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=16agvZ... Practice ionic compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53T44h... Practice covalent compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7InLJx... You will master chemical nomenclature by learning a few rules and an easy to follow system.
Views: 423116 Mr. Causey
Boiling points of organic compounds | Structure and bonding | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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How to analyze the different boiling points of organic compounds using intermolecular forces. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/solubility-of-organic-compounds-redo?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/intermolecular-forces-and-molecular-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Identifying Strong Electrolytes, Weak Electrolytes, and Nonelectrolytes - Chemistry Examples
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to identify weak electrolytes, strong electrolytes, and nonelectrolytes. Strong electrolytes including strong acids and bases as well as soluble ionic compounds that ionize completely in solution. Weak electrolytes include weak acids and bases and insoluble ionic compounds that ionizes partially in aqueous solution. Nonelectrolytes may be soluble in water but they do not ionize. Sugar and alcohol mixed with water are common nonelectrolytes that do not conduct electricity. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Boiling/Melting Points and Intermolecular Forces
 
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Compare various substances and match them with their listed boiling or melting points. Also, look at which molecules in a list exhibit hydrogen-bonding Produced by Ray Dickinson, General & Introductory Chemistry Instructor at CSCC, Cleveland State Community College
Views: 103443 SlowChem
Solubility and intermolecular forces | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Solubility of salt and gas solutes in liquid solvent. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/introduction-to-intermolecular-forces/v/surface-tension?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/introduction-to-intermolecular-forces/v/van-der-waals-forces?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 645565 Khan Academy
What Are Intermolecular Forces | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
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Learn what intermolecular forces are, the three most common types and the differences between them. An intermolecular force is simply an attractive force between neighbouring molecules. There are three common types of intermolecular force: permanent dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonds and van der Waals' forces. All these three forces are very much weaker than ionic or covalent bonds which bind atoms and ions together in elements and compounds. Permanent dipole-dipole forces: A polar molecule is one in which there is a permanent dipole, arising usually because the different atoms in the molecule have different electro-negativities. Hydrogen chloride is a polar molecule as the pair of electrons in the H---Cl bond are nearer the Cl atom because it has a greater electronegativity than the H atom. The two electrons of the covalent bond between the hydrogen and chlorine atoms are nearer the chlorine atom because of its greater electronegativity. Thus there will be an attraction between the chlorine atom of one molecule and the hydrogen atom of a neighbouring molecule. Hydrogen bonds: The second type of intermolecular force is the hydrogen bond. The permanent dipole in a covalent bond between a hydrogen atom and a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom is particularly strong. Thus the attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is much stronger than the permanent dipole-dipole attraction between the two hydrogen chloride molecules. This particular type of dipole-dipole attraction between the electron deficient H of one molecule and the lone pair of electrons on a fluorine, oxygen or nitrogen atom of another molecule is given the special name of hydrogen bond. Even though a hydrogen bond has only about 5% the strength of a covalent bond, it does have significant effects on the physical properties of compounds. Were it not for hydrogen bonds both water and alcohol would be gases at room temperature and pressure. Hydrogen bonds explain the lower volatility of alcohols compared to that of alkanes of similar molecular mass. van der Waals’ forces: van der Waals’ forces are induced dipole-dipole interactions. They arise out of movement of the electrons in the shells.These induced dipole-dipole interactions, called van der Waals’ forces occur in all molecules, whether polar or not, but are the only intermolecular forces between non-polar molecules such as the halogens and the noble gases. As the number of electrons in the molecule increases, so do the van der Waals’ forces. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind FuseSchool. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
Types of Chemical Reactions
 
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We'll learn about the five major types of chemical reactions: synthesis, decomposition, synthesis, single replacement (also called single displacement) and double replacement (also called double displacement). We'll look at examples of each, so that you can classify them, figuring out what type they are. In a synthesis reaction, a compound is made from more simple materials. In a decomposition reaction, a compound breaks down into simpler elements or compounds. In a combustion reaction, a compound (usually with carbon, hydrogen, and sometimes oxygen) combines with oxygen to give carbon dioxide and water. In a single replacement (displacement) reaction, one element that is on its own displaces another element in aqueous solution, kicking it out. In a double replacement (displacement) reaction, the positive and negative ions in two ionic compounds switch places, causing a precipitate to form.
Views: 823154 Tyler DeWitt
CHEMISTRY 101 - Identify intermolecular forces and discover their importance in physical properties
 
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Learning Objective: Learn the interactions involving polar molecules and nonpolar molecules. Practice identifying intermolecular forces. Learning Objective: Discover the importance of intermolecular forces in properties such as solubility, boiling points, etc. Topics: intermolecular forces, London dispersion forces, dispersion forces, van der Waals forces, dipole-dipole forces, hydrogen bonding, ion-dipole forces, instantaneous dipole, induced dipole, miscibility
Views: 1399 Matthew Gerner
Intermolecular Forces of NH3 - Ammonia
 
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This video discusses the intermolecular forces of Ammonia also written as NH3.
Dipole Dipole Forces of Attraction - Intermolecular Forces
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into dipole dipole forces of attraction. A dipole is a molecule that contains a permanent separation of charge. One side of the molecule may have a partial positive charge while the other side may contain a partial negative charge. The dipole dipole interactions arises when the partial positive charge of one molecule is attracted to the partial negative charge of another molecule. Therefore, dipole dipole interactions are intermolecular forces. This video contains plenty of examples of dipole dipole attractions. Every polar molecule contains a dipole moment. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Writing Ionic and Covalent Formulas
 
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How to write ionic and covalent chemical formulas. Mr. Causey shows how easy it is to write ionic compound and covalent compound formulas. All you need is a periodic table, a list of polyatomic ions and some simple rules and you're ready to start writing formulas. http://www.yourCHEMcoach.com SUBSCRIBE for more chemistry videos: http://bit.ly/1jeutVl ABOUT MR. CAUSEY'S VIDEO ACADEMY Mr. Causey's Video Academy is an educational video series of short video lessons for chemistry, algebra and physics. You can get lessons on a variety of topics or homework helpers that show you how to solve certain problems. There are over 120 videos to choose from. CONTACT ME: [email protected] FOLLOW ME: http://www.twitter.com/#!/mrcausey http://www.twitter.com/#!/mr_causey http://pinterest.com/mistercausey/ http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=814523544 https://plus.google.com/u/0/111105504415887392612 RESOURCES Polyatomic Ion Cheat Sheet: http://bit.ly/14e2pbw Periodic Table: http://bit.ly/ptable9 RELATED VIDEOS: Writing Ionic Formulas: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-T5W0ptk9SE Writing Covalent Formulas: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DwwNvNwGHjk Naming Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XUsOLaz3zY Naming Ionic Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53T44hVKS_Q Naming Covalent Compounds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7InLJxj7qDE In this lesson, we'll go through the formula anatomy, binary compounds, writing formulas, and ionic and covalent formulas. You will need a periodic table, unless you have it memorized. You will need a list of the major polyatomic ions. And if you get my list, you'll have a list of the metal cations and the numeric prefixes as well. You need to know oxidation numbers, polyatomic ions, the periodic table, covalent and ionic bonds, and the chemical names. It is very important to know these things. Especially, be familiar with the covalent and ionic bonds. So, a chemical formula, what is it? It's a symbolic representation of a chemical compound. For instance, potassium permanganate, its symbolic representation would be KMnO4. Let's take a look at formula anatomy. You need to make sure you understand how formulas are put together. Here's the formula for "calcium fluoride". The "Ca" and the "F", or the calcium and the fluorine, that's the elements. The small numbers below and to the right are called subscripts. Subscripts tell you how many atoms or ions are needed in that substance. There must be two fluorine ions in calcium fluoride. So, we put a two for the subscript. Since there is only one calcium ion, we don't write the one, similar to algebra. The number out in front is the coefficient and tells you how many formula units, molecules or moles are being used. Remember, most compounds are binary, meaning they have two parts. KCl or H2O. Notice that KCl is potassium and chlorine and H2O is hydrogen and oxygen.
Views: 127838 Mr. Causey
Pure Substances and Mixtures, Elements & Compounds, Classification of Matter, Chemistry Examples,
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on pure substances and mixtures. It's a subtopic of the classification of matter. Pure substances include elements and compounds where as a mixture is a combination of two or more pure substances. A pure element consist of only one type of atom. A molecule consist of multiple atoms and a compound consists of different atoms. Individually, these are all pure substances. Examples of pure substances include hydrogen, water, silver, 24k gold, sugar, and iron metal. Examples of mixtures are salt water, seawater, air, brass - an alloy of copper and zinc, milk, sugar water, sterling silver, soda, wood, wine, soil, and rubbing alcohol. Pure substances have a constant composition where as a mixture can have a variable composition. Mixtures can be separated by a physical process such as evaporation, boiling, decanting, centrifugation, chromatography and filtration. Pure substances that exist as compounds can be broken down into elements using a chemical process such as water converting into hydrogen and oxygen gas by means of electrolysis. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Boiling point elevation and freezing point depression | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Raising or lowering the boiling or freezing point of a solution by adding solute. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-equilibrium/equilibrium-constant/v/reactions-in-equilibrium?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/states-of-matter-and-intermolecular-forces/mixtures-and-solutions/v/suspensions-colloids-and-solutions?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 419567 Khan Academy
Rank The Following Compounds In Order of Increasing Boiling Point: HBr, HI, HF, HCl
 
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This video shows you how to rank the following compounds in order of increasing boiling for HF, HI, HCl, and HBr.
Views: 12869 Math & Science 2024
Lewis Structures, Introduction, Formal Charge, Molecular Geometry, Resonance, Polar or Nonpolar
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to draw lewis structures of molecules and the lewis dot diagram of polyatomic ions. It shows you how to calculate the formal charge, how to draw the resonance form of the lewis structure and how to determine the hybridization of the central atom. It also discusses molecular geometry / vsepr and the bond angles that are found in common molecules as well as if the molecule is polar or nonpolar. This video contains plenty of formulas, notes, examples, and practice problems that will help you on your next worksheet assignment or upcoming quiz. This video contains all the answers / solutions to the problems posted. General Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Here is a list of topics: 1. How to draw the Lewis structure of a molecule or compound 2. Valence Electrons of Common Elements - Boron, Carbon, Nitrogen, Oxygen and Fluorine 3. Number of Bonds Elements Prefer to Form 4. Lone Pairs, Bonding Electrons, and Nonbonding Electrons 5. Octet Rule - Expanded Octet vs Incomplete Octet 6. Lewis Dot Structure of Diatomic Molecules / Elements - F2, O2, N2, and H2 7. Lewis Dot Diagram - BH3 - Incomplete Octet 8. Molecular Geometry of BH3 - Trigonal Planar - Bond Angle 120 Degrees 9. Formal Charge Calculations - Equation / Formula 10. Formal Charge = Valence Electrons - (Bonds + Dots) 11. How to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar 12. Polar vs Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Electronegativity Difference 13. Lewis Structures of H2O, H3O+, and OH- With Formal Charge Calculation 14. Why is CO2 Nonpolar When CO is Polar 15. Lewis Structure For CO2 and CO 16. CO2 - Linear Molecular Geometry, 180 Bond Angle 17. Hybridization - s, sp, sp2, sp3, dsp3 or sp3d, d^2sp3 or sp3d2 18. Lewis Structure For CH4 - Tetrahedral Molecular Geometry - Bond Angle of 109.5 Plus Hybridization 19. Lewis Dot Structure For NH3 - Trigonal Pyramidal - Bond Angle of 107, Sp3 Hybridized. 20. Lewis Structure For H2S - Bent Molecular Geometry and Tetrahedral Electron Pair Geometry 21. Molecular Geometry vs Electron Pair Geometry 22. Lewis Structure For SF6 - Octahedral Molecular Geometry, 90 Bond Angle, Sp3d2 Hybridized, Nonpolar 23. Lewis Structure For PCl5 - Polar or Nonpolar? 24. Lewis Structure For SF4, I3-, XeF4, IF5 - Multiple of 8 technique 25. How To Determine The Number of Lone Pairs on the Central Element 26. Lewis Structure For SOF2, POCl3, SO2Cl2, XeOF2 - Multiple Elements in a molecule - How to determine which element goes in the middle 27. Lewis Dot Diagrams With Resonance - CO3 2-, NO2-, BF3, and NO3- Lewis Structure 28. Polyatomic Ions - Lewis Structure For SO4 2-, PO4 3-, ClO4-, ClO3-, ClO2-, and ClO- 29. Lewis Structures With Radicals - Odd Number of Electrons - NO2 and NO Lewis Structure 30. Lewis Structures - Organic Molecules - Organic Chemistry - Functional Groups 31. Lewis Structure For C2H6 Ethane, C2H4 Ethene, C2H2 Acetylene or Ethyne - Alkanes, Alkenes, and Alkynes 32. Lewis Structure For CH3OH - Methanol - Alcohol Functional Group 33. Lewis Structure For CH3CHO - Ethanal - Aldehyde / Carbonyl 34. Lewis Structure For CH3COOH - Ethanoic Acid or Acetic Acid Found In Vinegar - Carboxylic Acid Functional Group 35. CH3COCH3 Lewis Structure - Acetone or Propanone - Ketone 36. Lewis Structure For CH3OCH3 - Dimethyl Ether 37. Lewis Structure For CH3CO2CH3 - Ester 38. Lewis Structure For CH3CH2NH2 - Ethyl Amine 39. Lewis Structure For CH3CONH2 - Ethanamide - Amide Functional Group 40. Lewis Structure For CH3CN - Nitrile
Which molecules have higher (or lower) vapor pressure
 
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Stronger intermolecular forces = LOWER vapor pressure Weaker intermolecular forces = HIGHER vapor pressure Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 80787 chemistNATE
Ionic, covalent, and metallic bonds | Chemical bonds | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
13:22
Introduction to ionic, covalent, polar covalent and metallic bonds. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-bonds/types-chemical-bonds/v/electronegativity-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/periodic-table/periodic-table-trends-bonding/v/metallic-nature-trends?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2223657 Khan Academy
Soluble and Insoluble Compounds Chart - Solubility Rules Table - List of Salts & Substances
 
12:43
This chemistry video tutorial focuses the difference between soluble and insoluble compounds. It contains a table or chart of the solubility rules and it provides a list of salts and substances - some of which are soluble while others are insoluble. This video contains a worksheet of examples and problems toward the end of the video including answers and solutions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Understanding The Solubility Rules Table 2. Ions that are always soluble - Na+, K+, Li+, NH4+, C2H3O2-, Cs+, Rb+, ClO4-, ClO3-, and HCO3- 3. Ions that are generally soluble - Cl-, Br-, I- (halides) - Exceptions - Pb2+, Ag+, Hg2 2+ 4. Sulfates are generally soluble except with Ba2+, Ca+2, and Sr2+ 5. The difference between soluble and insoluble compounds - aqueous vs solid phases 6. Substances that are generally insoluble - Hydroxides, carbonates, sulfides, and phosphates
London Dispersion Forces
 
05:02
016 - London Dispersion Forces In this video Paul Andersen describes the positive force intermolecular forces found between all atoms and molecules. As electrons are distributed unevenly it creates instantaneous dipoles which hold molecules together. This force even holds uncharged atoms (like Noble gases) together. London dispersion forces increase as surface area, molecule sizing and pi bonding increases. Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: File:Bunsen-Tagung 1928 Ausschnitt.jpg, n.d. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bunsen-Tagung_1928_Ausschnitt.jpg. "File:Myoglobin.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Myoglobin.png. "File:Neopentane 3D 1.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Neopentane_3D_1.png. "File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png. "File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed August 9, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Pentane-3D-space-filling.png. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:2_Helium.png, n.d.
Views: 299009 Bozeman Science
Intermolecular Forces of Acetone - CH3COCH3
 
01:49
This video discusses the intermolecular forces that are found in acetone (CH3COCH3)
DAT General Chemistry Review Part 2
 
05:56:52
This DAT General Chemistry Review Video tutorial focuses on chemistry topics such as waves, electromagnetic radiation, quantum numbers, electron configuration, lewis structures, VSEPR, molecular geometry, solution concentration, phase diagrams, henry's law, chemical kinetics, nuclear chemistry plus more. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems showing you how to solve math problems without the use of a calculator. Here is a list of topics: 1. Electromagnetic Spectrum - Radio Waves, Microwaves, Infrared, Visible Light (ROYGBIV), Ultraviolet, X-rays, and Gamma Rays 2. Wavelength, Frequency, Speed of Light and Energy of a Photon 3. Electron Transitions - Initial and Final State - Energy Absorbed vs Released. 4. Electron Configuration of Elements and Ions - Transition Metals - Fe, Fe+2, and Fe+3 including Exceptions - Cu, Cr, Au, Ag, and Mo 5. S, P, D, F Orbitals and Quantum Numbers - n, l, ml, and ms 6. Principal Quantum Number, Angular Momentum, and Magnetic Quantum Number Plus Electron Spin 7. Orbital Energy Level Diagrams 8. Hund's Rule, Aufbau Principle, and Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle 9. Lewis Structures - CO2, NH3, H2O, N2, F2, O2, H2, SCl6, SF4, XeF4 10. Molecular Geometry - Linear, Trigonal Planar, Bent, Trigonal Pyramidal, Seesaw, T-shaped, Square Planar, Trigonal Bipyramidal, and Octahedral 11. VSEPR, Hybridization and Bond Angles 12. Polar and Nonpolar Molecules 13. Electronegativity, Atomic Radius, Ionic Radii, Ionization Energy, Electron Affinity, Metallic Character - Periodic Trends 14. Henry's Law - Gas Solubility and Partial Pressure Problems 15. Solution Concentration - Molality, Molarity, and Mass Percent 16. Phase Diagrams of Water and CO2 17. Triple Point, Melting Point, and Critical Point 18. Solids, Liquids, Gases - Condensation, Vaporization, Freezing, Melting, Sublimation and Deposition 19. Colligative Properties - Boiling Point Elevation, Freezing Point Depression, Vapor Pressure Lowering, and Osmotic Pressure 20. Intermolecular Forces - Ionic, Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole Dipole Interactions, Permanent vs Temporary Induced Dipole - London Dispersion and Van Der Waal Forces 21. Chemical Kinetics - Rate Law Expressions 22. Zero, First, and Second Order Reactions 23. Integrated Rate Law Equations and Formulas 24. Rate Constant K, Activation Energy, Potential Energy Diagrams, Catalyst, and Temperature 25. Reaction Mechanisms - Identifying The Catalyst and Intermediate 26. Nuclear Chemistry - Alpha Particle - Beta Particle / Electron, Positron, Proton, Neutron, and Gamma Ray Photon
Bonding Models and Lewis Structures: Crash Course Chemistry #24
 
11:38
Models are great, except they're also usually inaccurate. In this episode of Crash Course Chemistry, Hank discusses why we need models in the world and how we can learn from them... even when they're almost completely wrong. Plus, Lewis Structures! -- Table of Contents Models :06 Linus Pauling & The Bonding Model 9:16 Lewis Dot Structures 4:27 Ionic Bonds 5:30 Covalent Bonds 6:10 Double Bonds 7:17 Triple Bonds 8:14 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1395980 CrashCourse
Polar Molecules Tutorial: How to determine polarity in a molecule
 
10:36
This video looks at how to determine polarity in a molecule by understanding how the bond polarities, molecule shape, and outside atoms influence polarity using bond polarity vector addition. This includes a flow chart that guides you through the various decisions needed to determine if a molecule is polar or not. Wikipedia 1/1/2018: In chemistry, polarity is a separation of electric charge leading to a molecule or its chemical groups having an electric dipole or multipole moment. Polar molecules must contain polar bonds due to a difference in electronegativity between the bonded atoms. A polar molecule with two or more polar bonds must have a geometry which is asymmetric in at least one direction, so that the bond dipoles do not cancel each other. While the molecules can be described as "polar covalent", "nonpolar covalent", or "ionic", this is often a relative term, with one molecule simply being more polar or more nonpolar than another. However, the following properties are typical of such molecules. A molecule is composed of one or more chemical bonds between molecular orbitals of different atoms. A molecule may be polar either as a result of polar bonds due to differences in electronegativity as described above, or as a result of an asymmetric arrangement of nonpolar covalent bonds and non-bonding pairs of electrons known as a full molecular orbital. Polar molecules[edit] The water molecule is made up of oxygen and hydrogen, with respective electronegativities of 3.44 and 2.20. The dipoles from each of the two bonds (red arrows) add together to make the overall molecule polar. A polar molecule has a net dipole as a result of the opposing charges (i.e. having partial positive and partial negative charges) from polar bonds arranged asymmetrically. Water (H2O) is an example of a polar molecule since it has a slight positive charge on one side and a slight negative charge on the other. The dipoles do not cancel out resulting in a net dipole. Due to the polar nature of the water molecule itself, polar molecules are generally able to dissolve in water. Other examples include sugars (like sucrose), which have many polar oxygen–hydrogen (−OH) groups and are overall highly polar. If the bond dipole moments of the molecule do not cancel, the molecule is polar. For example, the water molecule (H2O) contains two polar O−H bonds in a bent (nonlinear) geometry. The bond dipole moments do not cancel, so that the molecule forms a molecular dipole with its negative pole at the oxygen and its positive pole midway between the two hydrogen atoms. In the figure each bond joins the central O atom with a negative charge (red) to an H atom with a positive charge (blue). The hydrogen fluoride, HF, molecule is polar by virtue of polar covalent bonds – in the covalent bond electrons are displaced toward the more electronegative fluorine atom. Ammonia, NH3, molecule the three N−H bonds have only a slight polarity (toward the more electronegative nitrogen atom). The molecule has two lone electrons in an orbital, that points towards the fourth apex of the approximate tetrahedron, (VSEPR). This orbital is not participating in covalent bonding; it is electron-rich, which results in a powerful dipole across the whole ammonia molecule. Resonance Lewis structures of the ozone molecule In ozone (O3) molecules, the two O−O bonds are nonpolar (there is no electronegativity difference between atoms of the same element). However, the distribution of other electrons is uneven – since the central atom has to share electrons with two other atoms, but each of the outer atoms has to share electrons with only one other atom, the central atom is more deprived of electrons than the others (the central atom has a formal charge of +1, while the outer atoms each have a formal charge of −​1⁄2). Since the molecule has a bent geometry, the result is a dipole across the whole ozone molecule. When comparing a polar and nonpolar molecule with similar molar masses, the polar molecule in general has a higher boiling point, because the dipole–dipole interaction between polar molecules results in stronger intermolecular attractions. One common form of polar interaction is the hydrogen bond, which is also known as the H-bond. For example, water forms H-bonds and has a molar mass M = 18 and a boiling point of +100 °C, compared to nonpolar methane with M = 16 and a boiling point of –161 °C. Nonpolar molecules[edit] A molecule may be nonpolar either when there is an equal sharing of electrons between the two atoms of a diatomic molecule or because of the symmetrical arrangement of polar bonds in a more complex molecule. Not every molecule with polar bonds is a polar molecule. Carbon dioxide (CO2) has two polar C=O bonds, but the geometry of CO2 is linear so that the two bond dipole moments cancel and there is no net molecular dipole moment; the molecule is nonpolar.
Views: 107038 Crash Chemistry Academy
Balancing Chemical Equations
 
14:28
The art of balancing equations in chemistry! More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=RnGu3xO2h74 About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything.
Views: 2270736 Khan Academy
Common polyatomic ions | Atoms, compounds, and ions | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
05:48
Reviewing the common polyatomic ions, and explaining common suffixes and prefixes to help remember the formulas. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/balancing-chemical-equations/v/chemical-reactions-introduction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-compounds/v/molecular-mass-and-molecular-weight?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Surface Tension of Water, Capillary Action, Cohesive and Adhesive Forces - Work & Potential Energy
 
12:54
This physics video tutorial provides a basic introduction into the surface tension of water. Surface tension prevents small amounts of water from flattening out across a surface. Rather, it causes water to minimize its surface area and as a result, water forms small beadlike droplets. This video also discusses the capillary action of water as it is draw up through small tubes known as capillaries. Surface tension can be calculated by divided the force per unit length required to increase the area of a fluid. The surface tension opposes the force and attempts to minimize the area. The work required to increase the area of a fluid by a force is the surface tension multiplied by the increase in area. This video discusses the difference in the capillary effects between water and mercury. Water rises above the surrounding fluid level in a thin glass tube where as mercury descends below that line. The adhesive forces in water is greater than the cohesive forces. In Mercury, the cohesive forces are greater than the adhesive forces. Adhesive forces exist between different molecules and atoms. Cohesive forces exist between the same type of molecules and atoms. New Physics Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0o_zxa4K1BU6wPPLDsoTj1_wEf0LSNeR Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Polar and NonPolar Molecules: Animations, Examples, and Practice
 
09:37
Learn to determine if a molecule is polar or nonpolar based on the polarity between bonds and the molecular geometry (shape). We start with the polarity between bonds using the electronegativity (EN) values on the Periodic Table provided. After that we’ll look at how the shape of the molecule, based on VSEPR, allows us to determine if the entire molecule is polar or nonpolar. In the video you will also learn how to deal with unbonded electron pairs (lone) and how it affects the symmetry and polarity of molecules. To help you learn and retain knowledge practice problems, with solutions, are provided throughout the video. Contents: - Finding is a bond between two atoms is polar or nonpolar. - Practice. - Finding is molecules are symmetrical and how this impacts polarity. - Practice. - The role of unbonded electron pairs on molecular shape and polarity. - Practice - Wrap up on polar and nonpolar molecules. Get more chemistry help at http://www.thegeoexchange.org/chemistry/bonding Molecular Shapes done with PhET's free online website: https://phet.colorado.edu/sims/html/molecule-shapes/latest/molecule-shapes_en.html Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 28415 Wayne Breslyn
General Chemistry 1 Review Study Guide - IB, AP, & College Chem Final Exam
 
02:19:08
This video tutorial study guide review is for students who are taking their first semester of college general chemistry, IB, or AP Chemistry. Even if you’re studying for the general chemistry section of the MCAT, DAT, PCAT, OAT or SAT Subject chemistry test, this video can help give you a nice overview of all the topics you need to learn in General Chemistry 1. This introduction video contains plenty of examples and practice problems to help prepare you for the final exam. It has about 160 multiple choice questions in the form of a practice test. Feel free to use it as a study guide. The solutions to each problem is provided as well as the equations and formulas that you need to solve it. General Chemistry Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BV-uX6wXQgyqZXvRd0tUUV0&index=3 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/ Here is a list of topics: 1. How To Find The Number of Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons In an Atom 2. Nomenclature of Ionic and Molecular Compounds 3. Percent Composition, Stoichiometry, Molarity, Dilution Problems, Acid Base Titrations 4. Oxidation State, Combined Gas Law, Gas Density at STP, Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressure 5. Collected over water gas law problems, How to Identify the Unknown Compound 6. Average Kinetic Energy of Gases, Real Gas vs Ideal Gas High Temperature Low Pressure 7. Specific Heat Capacity, Heat of Fusion, Heat of Combustion, Enthalpy, Products – Reactants, 8. Condensation, Sublimation, Melting, Vaporization, Freezing, Deposition 9. Heat of Formation, Wavelength Frequency and Energy of a photon, Electron Configuration 10. Which four quantum numbers are incorrect? N l ml ms, s p d f orbitals, 11. Electromagnetic radiation – Radio waves Microwaves Infrared Visible Light Ultraviolet X-rays and Gamma rays. 12. Ionization Energy Electronegativity Atomic Radii Ionic Radius Electron Affinity and Metallic Character 13. Hybridization, Molecular Geometry, Lewis Structure, Bond Angle, Polar or Nonpolar 14. SO2, CO2, CH4, BH3, H2O, NH3, BF3, SF6, NF3, SF4, PCl5, XeF4 15. Intermolecular Forces, Hydrogen Bonding, Dipole Dipole Interactions, London Dispersion Forces, Ion Dipole, Permanent Dipoles, Temporary Induce Dipole, Van der Waal Forces, and Ionic Bonds. 16. Highest Boiling Point, Lowest Freezing Point, pH of a solution, Empirical Formula, 17. Molality, Mass Percent, Density, Solutions, Nonelectrolytes, Vapor Pressure, Combustion Analysis 18. Colligative Properties – Boiling Point Elevation, Freezing Point Depression, Osmotic Pressure 19. Average atomic mass and Percent Relative Abundance, Chemical Change, Chemical Formula 20. Actual Yield, Theoretical Yield, and Percent Yield, Oxidizing Agent vs Reducing Agent 21. Grams to moles to molecules to atoms – conversions / dimensional analysis 22. How To Find The Mass of The Excess Reactant That Remains, Limiting Reactants, 23. Homogeneous Mixture – Air plus salt and water, Soluble vs Insoluble 24. Representative Elements, Transition Metals, Alkali Metals, Alkaline Earth Metals, Halogens, Chalcogens, Noble gases, and Inner Transition Metals 25. Redox Reactions, Single Replacement Reactions, Combustion Reactions, Synthesis Reactions, Combination Reactions, and Decomposition Reactions, Double Replacement Reactions 26. Acid Base Neutralization Reactions, Precipitation Reactions, Gas Evolution Reactions 27. How to Identify the Unknown Metal given its Oxide and Formula, Gas Stoichiometry 28. Ideal Gas Law PV=nRT, Molar mass of unknown gas, mole fraction and partial pressure, 29. Root Mean Square Velocity, Graham’s Law – Rate of Effusion, Kinetic Molecular Theory 30. Pressure Volume Temperature Graphs – Boyle’s Law, Charles Law, and Gay Lussac’s Law 31. ionic and covalent bonds, Internal Energy of System, 32. Final Temperature of Water Solution, Hess Law, Thermochemical Equations, 33. Endothermic vs Exothermic, Calorimetry, Lattice Energy, Valence Electrons, Paramagnetic. 34. electron configuration exceptions, noble gas notation 35. Hund’s rule, Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle, Aufbau Principle, Pauli Exclusion Principle 36. Linear, Trigonal Planar, Trigonal Pyramidal, Tetrahedral, Square Planar, Square Pyrimadial, Trigonal Bipyramidal, and Octahedral Molecular Geometry. 37. Sigma and Pi Bonds, Bond length vs Bond Strength, Single Double and Triple Bonds. 38. Bond Order, Highest Melting Point, Largest Dipole Moment, Clear vs Colored Solutions. 39. Metallic, Molecular and Network Solid, and Ionic Compounds. 40. Allotropes of Carbon – Graphite, Diamond, and Buckminsterfullerene or Bucky Balls 41. Oxides, Peroxides, and Superoxides. 42. Bond Dissociation Energy, Metal & Metalloid Conductivity. 43. Adhesive & Cohesive Forces, Surface Tension, Polarizability. 44. Gas Solubility, Henry’s Law, Vapor Pressure & Raoult’s Law
Polar and Nonpolar Covalent Bonds - Clear & Simple
 
10:25
NEW & IMPROVED VIDEO LINK - I've improved this video, check it out (http://youtu.be/4SjSKjmO38c). Determining the Type of Bond Based On Electronegativity. Polar, Nonpolar or Ionic Bonds. This is meant to be an introduction to molecular polarity. Higher order polar covalent molecules are not discussed. Clear & Simple Chemistry Explanation.
Views: 287533 sciencepost
Net Ionic Equation Worksheet and Answers
 
34:13
This chemistry video tutorial focuses on how to write net ionic equations. It provides a worksheet full of examples and practice problems along with the answers to the questions and how to get them. Here is a list of topics: 1. Net Ionic Equation of Double Replacement Reactions 2. How to Balance the Formula of an Ionic Compound 3. How to predict the products of a double displacement reaction 4. How to write the total ionic equation for a precipitation reaction 5. How to identify and remove the spectator ions 6. How to write the net ionic equation for an acid base reaction 7. Predicting the products and balancing the neutralization reaction 8. Net Ionic Equations – Strong acids and weak acids – low ionization / dissociation 9. Solubility Rules for net ionic equations 10. Writing Net Ionic Equations for Single Replacement Reactions – Redox 11. Diatomic Halogen Redox Reactions 11. Gas forming reactions – net and total ionic equations – CO2 and NH3
predicting states of matter in chemical reactions
 
08:33
This shows how to predict the states of matter of chemical elements and compounds in reactions.
Views: 34189 Heather Houston
Graham's Law of Effusion Practice Problems, Examples, and Formula
 
13:38
This graham's law of effusion chemistry video tutorial contains the plenty of examples and practice problems for you to work. It contains the equation or formula for graham's law of effusion in addition to discussion the fundamentals and concepts that are associated with the rate of effusion of a gas from one compartment into another compared to the molar mass of a gas and time. Here is a list of topics: 1. How To Calculate the Rate of Effusion of Helium Gas Given Argon 2. The relationship Between the Rate of Effusion and Molar Mass 3. Effusion vs Diffusion Definition, Concept, and Examples 4. How To Identify The Unknown Gas Using Graham's Law of Effusion By Calculating Molar Mass 5. How to find the time it takes for a gas to effuse from compartment into another.
How to Write Total and Net Ionic Equations (Easy)
 
05:23
How to write total and net ionic equations. 1. Write a balanced chemical equation 2. Break up all the (aq) compounds into its ions (this is TOTAL) 3. Get rid of spectator ions (things that appear on both sides) (this is NET) Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 782122 chemistNATE
Ksp Chemistry Problems - Calculating Molar Solubility, Common Ion Effect, pH, ICE Tables
 
42:52
This general chemistry video tutorial focuses on Ksp – the solubility product constant. It has plenty of examples and practice problems for you to work on to pass your next chemistry exam / test. Here is a list of topics: 1. How to Calculate Molar Solubility Using Ksp for AgCl and and Ca3(PO4)2 2. How to Convert Molar Solubility from M or mol/L to g/L 3. How to determine the concentration of the ions [Ag+], [Cl-], [Ca2+], [PO4 -3] 4. How To Find Ksp given molar solubility in moles per liter and grams per liter using PbCl2 and CuCl 5. Common Ion Effect – Calculating Molar solubility of CaF2 given Molarity of CaCl2 in a saturated solution 6. Calculating Molar Solubility of Al(OH)3 using Ksp and the pH of the solution 7. pH, pOH, [H+] and [OH-] equations and formulas 8. Le chatelier’s Principle – Chemical Equilibrium & Ksp – Reactant and Production Concentration 9. The effect of adding a common ion on solubility, dissolution, and precipitation 10. The effect of temperature on Ksp – Which way does the reaction shift? 11. The effect of adding CaCl2 to CaF2 on the pH of the solution 12. Solving for Ksp and Molar Solubility Using Ice Tables 13. How To Write The Equation or Equilibrium Expression For Ksp
Solubility of organic compounds | Structure and bonding | Organic chemistry | Khan Academy
 
12:21
How to predict if a compound dissolves in water. Practice identifying the hydrophobic and hydrophilic parts of a molecular structure. Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/organic-chemistry/gen-chem-review/electronegativity-polarity/v/boiling-points-of-organic-compounds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=organicchemistry Organic Chemistry on Khan Academy: Carbon can form covalent bonds with itself and other elements to create a mind-boggling array of structures. In organic chemistry, we will learn about the reactions chemists use to synthesize crazy carbon based structures, as well as the analytical methods to characterize them. We will also think about how those reactions are occurring on a molecular level with reaction mechanisms. Simply put, organic chemistry is like building with molecular Legos. Let's make some beautiful organic molecules! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Organic Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCNKPjijOc0WEJ7DIV_Vay3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Molecular Orbital Theory, Bonding & Antibonding MO, Bond Order, Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules
 
01:02:51
This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into molecular orbital theory. It describes the formation of bonding and antibonding molecular orbitals from the combination of atomic orbitals. It explains how to calculate the bond order of homonuclear diatomic molecule as well as heteronuclear diatomic molecules. It also contains examples and practice problems of homonuclear and heteronuclear molecular ions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Molecular Orbital Theory - Basic Introduction 2. Constructive and Destructive Interference 3. Electrons as waves 4. Bonding and Antibonding Molecular Orbitals 5. Electrostatic forces within a molecule 6. Molecular Orbital Diagram For H2 7. Bond Order, Stability, Energy, and Bond Length 8. Single Bonds, Double Bonds, and Triple Bonds 9. Bond Order Formula 10. MO Diagrams of H2-, He2, Li2 11. Linear Combination of P Orbitals 12. Sigma and Pi Bonds of P orbitals 13. Bonding and Antibonding MO from P orbitals 14. MO Diagram of N2 15. Electron Configuration of Molecules 16. Paramagnetism vs Diamagnetism 17. Paired Electrons vs Unpaired Electrons 18. MO Diagrams For O2, O2+2, C2-2, CN-, and OF+, 19. Molecular Orbital Energy Diagrams 20. Homonuclear Diatomic Molecules 21. Heteronuclear Diatomic Molecular Ions 22. Electronegativity and MO Diagrams 23. Homo and Lumo Molecular orbitals New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
How to determine if a molecule is soluble - Real Chemistry
 
09:25
In this episode of Real Chemistry you will learn how to determine if an ionic compound is soluble or insoluble.
Views: 7891 Real Chemistry
Predicting Miscibility Example
 
11:36
Example problem predicting whether two liquids will be miscible in each other or not.
Views: 4701 Clayton Spencer
Osmotic Pressure Problems - Chemistry - Colligative Properties, Osmosis
 
14:16
This chemistry video tutorial explains how to solve osmotic pressure problems. It discusses the driving force of osmosis in a glass u-tube and it shows you how to calculate the molar mass of a solute dissolve in a solution. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Here is a list of topics: 1. Osmotic Pressure Definition 2. Osmotic Pressure Formula Derivation From Ideal Gas Law Equation 3. Osmosis - Movement of water from high concentration gradient to concentration gradient or high to low osmotic water potential 4. Solute, Solvent and Solution Relationship 5. The Purpose of the Semipermeable Membrane 6. The Glass U-tube Diagram 7. Pressure, Force and Area 8. Equilibrium - Osmotic Driving Force vs Weight Force of Gravity 9. Units of Osmotic Pressure - atm - Dimensional Analysis 10. Gas Constant R - 0.08206 11. Osmotic Pressure, Molarity, and Temperature 12. How to calculate the Molar Mass of a Solute Given Mass in Grams, Osmotic Pressure, and Temperature 13. Van't Hoff Factor i for ionic compounds 14. Nonelectrolytes and Ionization 15. How to calculate the concentration of the solution in Molarity given Mass and Volume
Determining states of matter for chemical reactions
 
04:36
common states of matter for chemicals in the common introductory chemical reactions (synthesis, decomposition, single displacement/replacement, double displacement, combustion, neutralization) are discussed. For single and double displacement reactions you should assume that the reactions are all in water therefore the salts should be solid or aqueous. For synthesis reactions where water is added, the products can also be aqueous. Decomposition reactions where heating is going on are usually not in water, but electricity run through a binary salt usually are aqueous. Acids and bases are typically aqueous. Typical liquids are bromine, water (sometimes a gas, steam), and mercury. Typical gases include many diatomics N2, O2, F2, Cl2, H2 and CO2, H2O, and other nonmetal oxides such as SO2, NO2 etc. Find more chemistry help here: https://sites.google.com/site/thechemistrytranslator/chemistry---milam-plymouth
Views: 48518 Scott Milam
Solubility of Ionic Compounds: Basics and Rules
 
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Basic discussion on the solubility of ionic compounds and the rules for determining whether an ionic compound is soluble or insoluble.
Views: 136866 Ben's Chem Videos
Rank The Following Compounds In Order of Decreasing Boiling Point: H2Te, H2S, H2O, H2Se
 
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This video shows you how to rank the following compounds in order of decreasing boiling point: H2Te, H2S, H2O, H2Se.
Views: 8179 Math & Science 2024

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