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What is INFORMATION THEORY? What does INFORMATION THEORY mean? INFORMATION THEORY meaning
 
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What is INFORMATION THEORY? What does INFORMATION THEORY mean? INFORMATION THEORY meaning. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Information theory studies the quantification, storage, and communication of information. It was originally proposed by Claude E. Shannon in 1948 to find fundamental limits on signal processing and communication operations such as data compression, in a landmark paper entitled "A Mathematical Theory of Communication". Now this theory has found applications in many other areas, including statistical inference, natural language processing, cryptography, neurobiology, the evolution and function of molecular codes, model selection in ecology, thermal physics, quantum computing, linguistics, plagiarism detection, pattern recognition, and anomaly detection. A key measure in information theory is "entropy". Entropy quantifies the amount of uncertainty involved in the value of a random variable or the outcome of a random process. For example, identifying the outcome of a fair coin flip (with two equally likely outcomes) provides less information (lower entropy) than specifying the outcome from a roll of a die (with six equally likely outcomes). Some other important measures in information theory are mutual information, channel capacity, error exponents, and relative entropy. Applications of fundamental topics of information theory include lossless data compression (e.g. ZIP files), lossy data compression (e.g. MP3s and JPEGs), and channel coding (e.g. for Digital Subscriber Line (DSL)). The field is at the intersection of mathematics, statistics, computer science, physics, neurobiology, and electrical engineering. Its impact has been crucial to the success of the Voyager missions to deep space, the invention of the compact disc, the feasibility of mobile phones, the development of the Internet, the study of linguistics and of human perception, the understanding of black holes, and numerous other fields. Important sub-fields of information theory include source coding, channel coding, algorithmic complexity theory, algorithmic information theory, information-theoretic security, and measures of information. Information theory studies the transmission, processing, utilization, and extraction of information. Abstractly, information can be thought of as the resolution of uncertainty. In the case of communication of information over a noisy channel, this abstract concept was made concrete in 1948 by Claude Shannon in his paper "A Mathematical Theory of Communication", in which "information" is thought of as a set of possible messages, where the goal is to send these messages over a noisy channel, and then to have the receiver reconstruct the message with low probability of error, in spite of the channel noise. Shannon's main result, the noisy-channel coding theorem showed that, in the limit of many channel uses, the rate of information that is asymptotically achievable is equal to the channel capacity, a quantity dependent merely on the statistics of the channel over which the messages are sent. Information theory is closely associated with a collection of pure and applied disciplines that have been investigated and reduced to engineering practice under a variety of rubrics throughout the world over the past half century or more: adaptive systems, anticipatory systems, artificial intelligence, complex systems, complexity science, cybernetics, informatics, machine learning, along with systems sciences of many descriptions. Information theory is a broad and deep mathematical theory, with equally broad and deep applications, amongst which is the vital field of coding theory. Coding theory is concerned with finding explicit methods, called codes, for increasing the efficiency and reducing the error rate of data communication over noisy channels to near the Channel capacity. These codes can be roughly subdivided into data compression (source coding) and error-correction (channel coding) techniques. In the latter case, it took many years to find the methods Shannon's work proved were possible. A third class of information theory codes are cryptographic algorithms (both codes and ciphers). Concepts, methods and results from coding theory and information theory are widely used in cryptography and cryptanalysis. See the article ban (unit) for a historical application. Information theory is also used in information retrieval, intelligence gathering, gambling, statistics, and even in musical composition.
Views: 2785 The Audiopedia
2 Challenges in Cryptography Research (ft. Serge Vaudenay)
 
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This video presents the Diffie-Hellman protocol, which is used to set up secure communication channels all over the Internet. It features Serge Vaudenay, full professor of the IC School at EPFL. https://people.epfl.ch/serge.vaudenay ————————————————————————————— The Diffie-Hellman Protocol (ft. Serge Vaudenay) | ZettaBytes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kOlCU4not0s
Views: 1450 ZettaBytes, EPFL
Cryptography for Everyone: John Voight at TEDxUVM
 
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(NOTE: This new upload has improved audio; the initial upload had 267 views) JOHN VOIGHT John Voight is an assistant professor of mathematics and computer science. His research interests include computational and algorithmic aspects of number theory and arithmetic algebraic geometry, with applications in cryptography and coding theory. About TEDx In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 2126 TEDx Talks
What is the Shannon capacity theorem?
 
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Long before wireless devices became ubiquitous, a brilliant mathematician named Claude Shannon had already determined one of the fundamental limits they would face. The Shannon capacity theorem bounds the rate that information can be transmitted across a noisy channel. Credits: Talking: Geoffrey Challen (Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Producing: Greg Bunyea (Undergraduate, Computer Science and Engineering, University at Buffalo). Part of the https://www.internet-class.org online internet course. A blue Systems Research Group (https://blue.cse.buffalo.edu) production.
Views: 33564 internet-class
The Danger Theory - Computerphile
 
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Artificial Immune Systems are taking on board cutting edge immunology research and creating algorithms that exploit it. Dr Julie Greensmith explains The Danger Theory. EXTRA BITS - Danger Theory Practical Demo: http://youtu.be/NXqIpU6Gejw AIS & Negative Selection: http://youtu.be/u2qRUtg2k3Y Public Key Cryptography: http://youtu.be/GSIDS_lvRv4 Crashes, Cosmic Rays and Kernel Panic: http://youtu.be/nr9auoHtvzM For more information on the Dendritic Cell Algorithm, visit Dr Greensmith's web page: http://ima.ac.uk/home/greensmith/ http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. See the full list of Brady's video projects at: http://bit.ly/bradychannels
Views: 68930 Computerphile
Cryptography research group
 
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This video explores the Cryptography research group at the University of Bristol through an interview with the head of the group, Prof. Nigel Smart.
Quantum Computing for Computer Scientists
 
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This talk discards hand-wavy pop-science metaphors and answers a simple question: from a computer science perspective, how can a quantum computer outperform a classical computer? Attendees will learn the following: - Representing computation with basic linear algebra (matrices and vectors) - The computational workings of qbits, superposition, and quantum logic gates - Solving the Deutsch oracle problem: the simplest problem where a quantum computer outperforms classical methods - Bonus topics: quantum entanglement and teleportation The talk concludes with a live demonstration of quantum entanglement on a real-world quantum computer, and a demo of the Deutsch oracle problem implemented in Q# with the Microsoft Quantum Development Kit. This talk assumes no prerequisite knowledge, although comfort with basic linear algebra (matrices, vectors, matrix multiplication) will ease understanding. See more at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/quantum-computing-computer-scientists/
Views: 72111 Microsoft Research
Cryptographic Algorithms - Bart Preneel
 
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Messages have been encrypted for millennia. Successfully hiding the plaintext has required increasingly sophisticated algorithms to defeat advances in crypto-analysis. Claude Shannon proved information theoretic security of the Vernam scheme, a.k.a. one-time pad. Since a one-time pad must be as long as the plaintext and can only be used once, the method is not widely used. Complexity theoretic security provides less strong but more practical security guarantees. Encryption provides confidentiality. In order to also ensure data authenticity, additional techniques are needed, such as Message Authentication Codes (MAC) or hashing. Alternatively, authenticated encryption combines confidentiality and data authenticity. Users of symmetric cryptography need to share a key between communicating parties. This is hard to do securely. Public key cryptology addresses this key distribution problem. Moreover, it affords digital signatures. In practice, public key cryptography is too slow to encrypt large amounts of data. Hence it is used for key agreement. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2015 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 934 secappdev.org
Origin of Markov chains | Journey into information theory | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to Markov chains Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/a-mathematical-theory-of-communication?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/informationtheory/moderninfotheory/v/how-do-we-measure-information-language-of-coins-10-12?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 163068 Khan Academy Labs
The Cryptographic Protocol - what are the techniques of cryptography?
 
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Want to learn more about Cryptocurrency and the Cryptographic Protocols? Watch the video below to see how simple & effective, Bitcoin trading can really be https://goo.gl/q8kdDV .... A protocol is a set of rules. It describes the proper protocol for certain actions and behaviors. David Johnston, the Governor General of Canada, broke protocol when he touched Queen Elizabeth II on the steps of Canada House on Trafalgar Square in London. The Queen was 91 years old at the time and the Governor General touched her arm to protect her from falling on the steps. It is protocol to not touch a member of Britain’s royal family. methods. Specific topics include: 1. Overview of communications channels used in power systems. 2. Review of cryptographic protocols and how they work. 3. How cryptography can impact monitoring, control, and protection communications. 4. Differences between substation communications systems and corporate The confidentiality and integrity protections offered by cryptographic protocols such as SSL/TLS can protect communications from malicious eavesdropping and tampering. Authenticity protections provide assurance that users are actually communicating with the systems as intended. For example, are you sending your Often cryptographic algorithms and protocols are necessary to keep a system secure, particularly when communicating through an untrusted network such as the Internet. Where possible, use cryptographic techniques to authenticate information and keep the information private (but don't assume that simple encryption SUMMARY. This project will focus on research in cryptology at an advanced international level. Project topics will be analysis and construction of symmetric and asymmetric cryptographic algorithms and protocols. In particular we will use our knowledge involving deep techniques from coding theory on cryptological. What is a cryptographic protocol? A cryptographic protocol is a protocol executed by several distant agents through a network where the messages or part of the messages are produced using cryptographic functions (encryption, hashing, etc.). Cryptographic protocols are used for various purpose between the agents:. May 7, 2006 - This is regarded as offensive because of the malicious payload normally embedded in the virus, and because of the use of anti-anti-virus techniques For instance, on networks some layer 2 protocols are based on crypto (WEP, WPA/TKIP, and others), as are some upper layer protocols (IPSec, SSH, SSL, primitives such as commutative encryption. We give a list of some relevant al- gebraic properties of cryptographic operators, and for each of them, we provide examples of protocols or attacks using these properties. We also give an overview of the existing methods in formal approaches for analyzing cryptographic proto-. Using cryptographic techniques, it may be possible to allow intermediate results in a distributed algorithm to be certified independently of who provides them, reducing themes of complexity theory, e.g., interactive provability, average vs. worst-case complexity, and the inherent communication costs of multiparty protocols. Web is an electronic protocol which allows people to communicate mail, information, and commerce through a digital medium. This new method of information exchange has caused a tremendous need for information security. A thorough understanding of cryptography and encryption will help people develop better ways to etc. The analysis techniques discussed in this survey assume per- fect cryptography. This means that cryptographic primitives are considered as black boxes satisfying certain properties, as described in section 2.1. below. This assumption by it- self does not ensure security of the protocols. Even if all cryptographic primitives The Cryptographic Protocol what are the techniques of cryptography types of cryptographic algorithms cryptography methods types of cryptography cryptography examples cryptography algorithms applications of cryptography cryptography basics cryptography computer science #TheCryptographicProtocolwhatarethetechniquesofcryptography #typesofcryptographicalgorithms #cryptographymethods #typesofcryptography #cryptographyexamples #cryptographyalgorithms #applicationsofcryptography #cryptographybasics #cryptographycomputerscience Visit our YouTube channel for more videos on Bitcoin and Cryptocurrency https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTxqXgVxEGQUIFY_MdRz5ww Also watch: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kH6u_CsQddE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W4LlCYVP65A This presentation contains images that were used under a Creative Commons License. Click here to see the full list of images and attributions: https://app.contentsamurai.com/cc/107949
Views: 146 BitCoin XTreme
Coding for Cryptographic Security Enhancement Using Stopping Sets
 
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Coding for Cryptographic Security Enhancement Using Stopping Sets TO GET THIS PROJECT IN ONLINE OR THROUGH TRAINING SESSIONS CONTACT: Chennai Office: JP INFOTECH, Old No.31, New No.86, 1st Floor, 1st Avenue, Ashok Pillar, Chennai – 83. Landmark: Next to Kotak Mahendra Bank / Bharath Scans. Landline: (044) - 43012642 / Mobile: (0)9952649690 Pondicherry Office: JP INFOTECH, #45, Kamaraj Salai, Thattanchavady, Puducherry – 9. Landmark: Opp. To Thattanchavady Industrial Estate & Next to VVP Nagar Arch. Landline: (0413) - 4300535 / Mobile: (0)8608600246 / (0)9952649690 Email: [email protected], Website: http://www.jpinfotech.org, Blog: http://www.jpinfotech.blogspot.com 2011 IEEE projects, 2011 IEEE java projects, 2011 IEEE Dotnet projects, 2011 IEEE .net projects,IEEE Projects, IEEE Projects 2011,IEEE Academic Projects, IEEE 2011 Projects, IEEE, IEEE Projects Pondicherry,IEEE Software Projects, Latest IEEE Projects,IEEE Student Projects, IEEE Final year Student Projects,Final Year Projects, final year IEEE 2011 projects, final year 2011 projects,ENGINEERING PROJECTS, MCA projects, BE projects, Embedded Projects, JAVA projects, J2EE projects, .NET projects, Students projects,BE projects, B.Tech. projects, ME projects, M.Tech. projects, M.Phil Projects,jp infotech
Views: 200 jpinfotechprojects
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
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Call for papers :- =========== International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding Detection and estimation of Mobile communications Pattern recognition and Learning Learning and inference Communications and communication networks Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography Multi-User Information Theory Quantum theory and coding Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission ============= Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal.
Views: 6 IJASUC journal
Post Snowden Cryptography or Who Holds Your Keys? - Bart Preneel
 
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Post-Snowden cryptography, by Bart Preneel. This lecture presents an overview of the Snowden revelations and the impact on our understanding of the security of our networks and systems. In particular, it discusses the known ways in which sophisticated attackers can bypass or undermine cryptography. We also speculate on how three-letter agencies could be breaking most encryption on the Internet. We relate this to the latest developments in cryptanalysis and discuss which cryptographic algorithms and implementations to select to stay protected. Learning objectives + Understand how sophisticated opponents can undermine cryptographic protection + Understand how to maximize your chances to resist sophisticated opponents using cryptographic techniques This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2014 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1817 secappdev.org
Nadia Heninger, Tanja Lange and Dan Bernstein Heninger "Is cryptopocalyse near?"
 
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Cryptography is difficult to explain to common people but we all use it. Generally it only reaches the news when some code is broken. These highly intelligent experts, present at the NCSC One Conference have their way to explain how. Tanja Lange is a full professor at the Technical University Eindhoven in coding theory and cryptography. Dan Bernstein is Research Professor in the Department of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Chicago and Professor in the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science at Eindhoven University. Nadia Heninger is an assistant professor in the Computer and Information Science department at the University of Pennsylvania. Date: 3 June 2014 Interviewer: Chris van 't Hof Video: Rec.online Location: World Forum The Hague Thanks to the Dutch National Cyber Security Centre
Views: 4402 Tek Tok
Quantum Cryptography Explained
 
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This episode is brought to you by Squarespace: http://www.squarespace.com/physicsgirl With recent high-profile security decryption cases, encryption is more important than ever. Much of your browser usage and your smartphone data is encrypted. But what does that process actually entail? And when computers get smarter and faster due to advances in quantum physics, how will encryption keep up? http://physicsgirl.org/ ‪http://twitter.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://facebook.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://instagram.com/thephysicsgirl http://physicsgirl.org/ Help us translate our videos! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7DdEm33SyaTDtWYGO2CwdA&tab=2 Creator/Editor: Dianna Cowern Writer: Sophia Chen Animator: Kyle Norby Special thanks to Nathan Lysne Source: http://gva.noekeon.org/QCandSKD/QCand... http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/n... https://epic.org/crypto/export_contro... http://fas.org/irp/offdocs/eo_crypt_9... Music: APM and YouTube
Views: 263603 Physics Girl
A Beginner’s Guide To Quantum Computing
 
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Dr. Talia Gershon, a materials scientist by training, came to IBM Research in 2012. After 4.5 years of developing next-generation solar cell materials, she got inspired to learn about quantum computing because it might enable all kinds of discoveries (including new materials). Having authored the Beginner's Guide to the QX, she passionately believes that anyone can get started learning quantum! - Maker Faire Bay Area 2017 PERMISSIONS: The original video was published on IBM Research YouTube channel with the Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed). ORIGINAL SOURCE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S52rxZG-zi0
Views: 552541 Coding Tech
Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment - Bart Preneel
 
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Entity Authentication and Symmetric Key Establishment, by Bart Preneel Authentication methods are based on something known, owned, biometric, location or evidence of trusted third party authentication. + A password is a case of something known. Passwords are a vulnerable, but cheap and convenient way of authenticating an entity. Several techniques to augment their effectiveness are in use including challenge-response and one-time passwords. + Secure devices such as smart cards and USB tokens often combine the 'owned' with the 'known', since secret keys are locked in the token with a password or PIN code. However, within the broad category of secure tokens, trustworthiness is variable, depending on whether keys can be extracted, passwords can be eavesdropped or the device can be tampered with. + Biometry identifies a person via physical characteristics. + Location is often used as the sole authentication factor, but is insecure given the relative ease of spoofing IP or MAC addresses. + Multi-factor authentication is stronger than single-factor. + The Kerberos protocol uses a key distribution-based authentication server. Service consumers must authenticate with a central server to obtain a secret session key with service providers. Such schemes require a single sign-on to access servers across a trust domain. While public key cryptography is well suited to entity authentication, performance constraints often mandate a symmetric algorithm for encrypting data passed between systems. Key establishment should be linked to authentication, so that a party has assurances that a key is only shared with the authenticated party. The Diffie-Hellman key agreement protocol underlies a host of current technologies such as STS (Station-to-Station protocol) and IKE. Learning objectives Gain insight into + entity authentication protocols, + the benefits and limitations of authentication factors, + key establishment protocols, + why and how to use authentication servers. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel in Leuven on Tuesday February 11th at SecAppDev 2014. Professor Bart Preneel heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group at KU Leuven. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1396 secappdev.org
ADMA CONFERENCE 2018 | Abhay Kumar Singh | Constacyclic Codes of Prime Power Lengths | 2018-06-07
 
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Let p be a prime, and λ be a nonzero element of the finite field F_p^m. The λ-constacyclic codes of length p^s over F_p^m are linearly ordered under set-theoretic inclusion, i.e., they are the ideals (x − λ_0)^i , 0 ≤ i ≤ p^s of the chain ring [F_p^m/ x^p^s − λ]. This structure also gives the dual of such λ-constacyclic codes, which are λ^−1 constacyclic codes, and their hulls, which in turn provides necessary and sufficient conditions for the existence of self-dual, self- orthogonal, dual containing, and LCD λ-constacyclic codes. Then this structure is used to establish the symbol-pair distances of all such λ-constacyclic codes. Among others, we identified all MDS symbol-pair constacyclic codes of length p^s which satisfied the Singleton Bound for symbol-pair codes, i.e., |C| = p^(m(n−d_sp(C)+2)). About Speaker: Abhay Kumar Singh is currently an Assistant Professor in mathematics at the Department of Applied Mathematics, Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad. After completed his M.Sc. from Institute of Science, Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi (2002), and Ph.D. (2007) in Algebra from Indian Institute of Technology (BHU), Varanasi, he worked two year as a Lecturer in Department of Mathematics, CSJM University, Kanpur and then one year as an Assistant professor at M G Kashi Vidyapith University, Varanasi. Since July 2010, he has been working at Indian Institute of Technology (ISM), Dhanbad and currently he is a senior Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied Mathematics. His research interests include Theory of Rings and Modules, Algebraic Coding theory, Code base cryptography. Since 2010, he has published his works in Algebraic Coding Theory and Rings of Modules at high level peer-reviewed research journals such as Designs, Codes and Cryptography, IEEE TRANSACTIONS IN INFORMATION THEORY, Discrete Mathematics, Theoretical Computer Science.
International Journal on Information Theory IJIT
 
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International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) Call for papers :- International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding Detection and estimation of Mobile communications Pattern recognition and Learning Learning and inference Communications and communication networks Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography Multi-User Information Theory Quantum theory and coding Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal.
Information Theory part 15: How the search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence works
 
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Can information theory help us understand if alien signals are "possibly intelligent"? How can we possibly say if something is intelligent if we don't understand it? This final chapter features Carl Sagan, Phillip Morrison, Kent Cullers (SETI - The search for extraterrestrial intelligence) Link to paper by Doyle: https://web.archive.org/web/20060903080122/http://faculty.vetmed.ucdavis.edu/faculty/bjmccowan/Pubs/McCowanetal.JCP.2002.pdf
Views: 19382 Art of the Problem
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
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International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) Call for papers International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to • Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques • Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences • Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding • Detection and estimation of Mobile communications • Pattern recognition and Learning • Learning and inference • Communications and communication networks • Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography • Multi-User Information Theory • Quantum theory and coding • Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] . Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal. For other details please visit http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html
Views: 41 IJASUC journal
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
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International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) ******************************************************************* Call for papers :- =========== International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding Detection and estimation of Mobile communications Pattern recognition and Learning Learning and inference Communications and communication networks Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography Multi-User Information Theory Quantum theory and coding Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission ============= Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal. Important Dates =========== Submission Deadline : November 18, 2017 Acceptance Notification : December 18, 2017 Final Manuscript Due : December 26, 2017 Publication Date : Determined by the Editor-in-Chief For other details please visit http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html
Views: 1 Ijics Journal
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
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International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) Call for papers:- International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to • Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques • Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences • Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding • Detection and estimation of Mobile communications • Pattern recognition and Learning • Learning and inference • Communications and communication networks • Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography • Multi-User Information Theory • Quantum theory and coding • Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission ============= Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] or [email protected] . Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal. For other details please visit http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html
Views: 53 IJASUC journal
Quantum Computers Explained – Limits of Human Technology
 
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Where are the limits of human technology? And can we somehow avoid them? This is where quantum computers become very interesting. Check out THE NOVA PROJECT to learn more about dark energy: www.nova.org.au Support us on Patreon so we can make more stuff: https://www.patreon.com/Kurzgesagt?ty=h Get the music of the video here: https://soundcloud.com/epicmountain/quantum-computers https://epicmountainmusic.bandcamp.com/track/quantum-computers http://epic-mountain.com Wakelet: https://wakelet.com/wake/42ji9UMJzN?v=st Or follow us on social media or reddit: http://kurzgesagt.org https://www.reddit.com/r/kurzgesagt https://www.facebook.com/Kurzgesagt https://twitter.com/Kurz_Gesagt THANKS A LOT TO OUR LOVELY PATRONS FOR SUPPORTING US: Tamago231, H.H. Lewis, Kirin Tantinon, David, Max Lesterhuis, Marek Belski, Gisle, Colin Millions, Gregory Wolfe II, Lenoir Preminger, Abel X, Matt Knights, Amjad Al Taleb, Ian Bruce, Kris Wolfgramm, 麒麟 于, Christopher Shaw, 靖羊, Tomas Grolmus, Essena O’Neill, Kyle Messner, Pedro Devoto, Mark Radford, Ann-Marie Denham, Davide Pluda, Rik Vermeer, Justin Ritchie, Nicole White, Whireds, Claus Vallø, Jason Talley, Andrew Wu, Christian Dechery, Michael Howell, Michal Hanus, Cavit, Amary Wenger, JDKBot, Jason Eads, FreedomEagleAmerica, Roberto Maddaloni, TiagoF11, Harsha CS, Abhimanyu Yadav, Tracy Tobkin, Mike Fuchs, Elizabeth Mart, Jacob Wenger, Jeff Udall, Ricardo Affonso, Mauro Boffardi, Audrin Navarro, Troy Ross, Keith Tims, Santiago Perez, James, Jack Devlin, Chris Peters, Kenny Martin, Frederick Pickering, Lena Savelyeva, Ian Seale, Charles Ju, Brett Haugen, David Ramsey, Benjamin Dittes, Michelle Schoen, Albert Harguindey Sanchez, Michael King, Alex Kyriacou Alla Khvatova Thomas Rowan, Siim Sillamaa, David Bennell, Janzen,Bryn Farnsworth, Adam Recvlohe, Manuel Arredondo, Fred McIntyre, Maldock Manrique, Дмитрий, Ishita Bisht, Jake Ludwig, Zach Seggie, Casey Sloan, Myndert Papenhuyzen, rheingold3, AncientCulture, Orion Mondragon, Jan, Michael Kuperman, Alexander Argyropoulos Quantum Computers Explained – Limits of Human Technology Help us caption & translate this video! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UCsXVk37bltHxD1rDPwtNM8Q&tab=2
Quantum Computing 'Magic' - Computerphile
 
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Quantum Computing offers a potential sea-change in computer power, but what are the issues with it, why aren't we all using quantum iphones already? Associate Professor Dr Thorsten Altenkirch. Link to more information & Quantum IO Monad Code: http://bit.ly/Computerphile_QIOMonad *From Thorsten: "We have updated the hackage package to work with the new monad library. If you want to play with QIO read the paper and download the code and then you can start quantum programming. :-)" Public Key Cryptography: https://youtu.be/GSIDS_lvRv4 Cracking Windows by Atom Bombing: https://youtu.be/rRxuh9fp7QI Slow Loris Attack: https://youtu.be/XiFkyR35v2Y Google Deep Dream: https://youtu.be/BsSmBPmPeYQ http://www.facebook.com/computerphile https://twitter.com/computer_phile This video was filmed and edited by Sean Riley. Computer Science at the University of Nottingham: http://bit.ly/nottscomputer Computerphile is a sister project to Brady Haran's Numberphile. More at http://www.bradyharan.com
Views: 218059 Computerphile
Public Key Infrastructure Fundamentals - Bart Preneel
 
01:31:53
The function of a public key infrastructure (PKI) is to ensure secure delivery and management of public keys. Alternative trust models lead to different key architectures. Public keys are published by means of digitally signed certificates. A private key may be compromised, in which case the certificate containing the corresponding public key must be revoked. Many revocation methods are in current use. Publication of Certificate Revocation Lists (CRLs) and checking with an Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) responder are best established. Learning objectives + learn the components of a public key infrastructure. + understand key delivery and management mechanisms. A lecture by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 50569 secappdev.org
Error correcting codes, group theory, and invariant theory Part 1
 
34:03
Neil J. A. Sloane, Rutgers University Basic Notions and Research Perspectives Seminar, April 21, 2014 Abstract: Error-correcting codes have connections with many branches of mathematics, for example with block designs, groups, rings, invariant theory, and lattices. This talk will mention some of the highlights.
Entropy in Computers and Their Use in Encryption
 
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This video will talk discuss random number generation and how it relates to encryption in computers. This will look at why random numbers are important, how computers secure generate numbers as well as some challenges and new technologies to overcome these.
Views: 320 Daniel Lohin
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
00:11
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) Call for papers :- =========== International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding Detection and estimation of Mobile communications Pattern recognition and Learning Learning and inference Communications and communication networks Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography Multi-User Information Theory Quantum theory and coding Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission ============= Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal. For other details please visit http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html
Views: 5 IJASUC journal
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT)
 
00:11
International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html ISSN : 2319 - 7609 (Online) ; 2320 - 8465 (Print) Call for papers :- International Journal on Information Theory (IJIT) will provide an excellent international forum for sharing knowledge and results in theory, methodology and applications of Information Theory. Authors are solicited to contribute to the journals by submitting articles that illustrate research results, projects, surveying works and industrial experiences that describe significant advances in the areas of Information Theory and applications. Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following The topics suggested by this journal can be discussed in term of concepts, surveys, state of the art, research, standards, implementations, running experiments, applications, and industrial case studies. Authors are invited to submit complete unpublished papers, which are not under review in any other conference or journal in the following, but not limited to • Shannon theory, coding theory and techniques • Coded Modulation, data compression, sequences • Signal processing, Speech/Image Coding • Detection and estimation of Mobile communications • Pattern recognition and Learning • Learning and inference • Communications and communication networks • Optical Communications Complexity and cryptography • Multi-User Information Theory • Quantum theory and coding • Emerging applications of information theory Paper Submission Authors are invited to submit papers for this journal through E-mail: [email protected] Submissions must be original and should not have been published previously or be under consideration for publication while being evaluated for this Journal. For other details please visit http://airccse.org/journal/ijit/index.html
Views: 15 IJASUC journal
New Developments in Cryptology - Bart Preneel
 
01:36:30
This lecture by Bart Preneel was delivered at SecAppDev Leuven 2013. Professor Bart Preneel of K.U. Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the K.U.Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 1408 secappdev.org
Adam Young, Malicious Cryptography - Exposing Cryptovirology (February 27, 2004)
 
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From the CISR video library (http://www.cisr.us) Dr. Adam Young, Cigital Malicious Cryptography - Exposing Cryptovirology February 27, 2004 at the Naval Postgraduate School (http://www.nps.edu) ABSTRACT Cryptography is commonly regarded as an enabling technology. It allows for confidential information transmission over untrusted networks as well as the ability to prove the origin of messages. It is a technology that is critical in an on-line world. However, cryptography is also a very powerful disabling technology. In recent years there has been a significant amount of research into using well-known cryptographic paradigms and tools for the purposes of undermining the security of computer systems once internal access is acquired. This talk will give an overview of a new book that details this dark side of cryptography. The book is entitled "Malicious Cryptography: Exposing Cryptovirology," and is authored by Adam Young and Moti Yung (published by John Wiley & Sons). Some of the more noteworthy attacks that are described in the book are the following. It is shown how to use public key cryptography to mount reversible denial-of-service attacks. A virus attack is detailed in which the virus asymmetrically encrypts host data (that has not been backed-up). The effects of the attack can only be reversed if the attacker agrees to use his or her own private decryption key. It is shown how to devise a cryptovirus that steals data from a host machine without revealing that which is sought, even if the virus is under constant surveillance. It is shown how to design a password snatching cryptotrojan that makes it virtually impossible to identify the author when the encrypted passwords are retrieved. Furthermore, it is intractable to determine if the cryptotrojan is encrypting anything at all when all even when all of its actions are recorded and analyzed. Finally, cryptotrojans are described that attack industry-standard cryptosystems. By design, these Trojans give the attacker covert access to the private keys of users and are extremely robust against reverse-engineering. When implemented in tamper-resistant devices the theft cannot be detected by anyone save the attacker. The book also covers various countermeasures that can help protect against these attacks. About Dr. Adam Young Dr. Adam Young is a Research Scientist at Cigital. He is responsible for researching and developing software and techniques to help support the research goals for Cigital's research contracts. In his first year at Cigital, Adam has served as a primary investigator on a research project for the DoD. Adam Young recently worked for Lockheed Martin Global Telecommunications. Prior to this he was a Member of Technical Staff (MTS) at Lucent Technologies in the Secure Systems Research Division. Before joining Lucent he worked as a cryptography consultant for CertoCo (a spin-off of Banker's Trust). Dr. Young holds a BS in Electrical Engineering from Yale University, an MS in Computer Science from Columbia University, and a PhD in Computer Science from Columbia University that was awarded with Distinction. He gives invited talks regularly and will be giving an upcoming talk at the Palo Alto Research Center (PARC) on his forthcoming book [[i]]. He will also be giving an invited talk at the Sixth International Joint Meeting of the AMS and the Sociedad Matematica Mexicana (SMM), Special Session on Coding Theory and Cryptography, in Houston. The session is being held by Neal Koblitz. Dr. Young has also given invited talks at NYU, Bell Labs, and Sandia National Labs. He has taught computer science courses at Columbia University and is a member of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR). He has published numerous papers on cryptography, computer security, and algorithmic number theory and his next paper will be presented in the Cryptographer's Track of the RSA Conference, 2004 [[ii]]. [[i]] Adam Young, Moti Yung, "Malicious Cryptography: Exposing Cryptovirology," John Wiley & Sons, ISBN: 0-7645-4975-8, Feb. 2004. [[ii]] Adam Young, Moti Yung, "A Key Recovery System as Secure as Factoring," CT-RSA Conference, 2004.
Views: 1068 securitylectures
Cryptography Best Practices - Bart Preneel
 
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Application architects need to make informed choices to use cryptography well: + Alternative key architectures have their merits and drawbacks. PKIs, in particular, should be contrasted with symmetric key architectures such as Kerberos. + Network protocol characteristics are pivotal in ensuring distributed applications meet security requirements. Key strength choices impact on security guarantees offered, as do cryptographic algorithm modes. + While strong keys and wise use of cryptographic algorithms may thwart cryptanalytic attack, applications are insecure without prudent key management. In this context, key generation and key storage require particular attention. + The selection of crypto-libraries requires awareness of inherent library qualities and failures. Application developers are advised not to implement their own. Learning objectives + decide if and when cryptography should be used. + make informed key architecture and management decisions. + use appropriate algorithms and parameters. + select an appropriate cryptographic library. + choose network protocols for distributed applications. This lecture was delivered by Bart Preneel at SecAppDev 2013 in Leuven, Belgium. Professor Bart Preneel of KU Leuven heads the COSIC (COmputer Security and Industrial Cryptography) research group. His main research area is information security with a focus on cryptographic algorithms and protocols as well as their applications to both computer and network security, and mobile communications. He teaches cryptology, network security and coding theory at the KU Leuven and was visiting professor at the Ruhr Universitaet Bochum (Germany), the T.U.Graz (Austria), the University of Bergen (Norway), and the Universiteit Gent (Belgium). In '93-'94 he was a research fellow at the University of California at Berkeley. He has taught intensive courses around the world. He undertakes industrial consulting (Mastercard International, S.W.I.F.T., Proton World International,...), and participates in the work of ISO/IEC JTC1/SC27/WG2. Professor Preneel is Vice President of the International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR) and co-founder and chairman of LSEC vzw (Leuven Security Excellence Consortium).
Views: 2844 secappdev.org
How internet communication works: Network Coding
 
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A brief history of internet communication and packet switched networks leading to the idea of network coding. Paper featured in this video: Network Information Flow - http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download;jsessionid=F8130EA435749A8E44E666D09CCCDC8D?doi=10.1.1.534.2207&rep=rep1&type=pdf
Views: 11672 Art of the Problem
The Math Needed for Computer Science
 
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►Support the Channel Patreon: https://patreon.com/majorprep PayPal: https://www.paypal.me/majorprep Computer science majors have to learn a different kind of math compared to MOST other majors (with the exception of math majors, plus computer and software engineers). This kind of math is important especially for those looking to go into research in fields like computer science, A.I., or even pure mathematics. Join Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/majorprep/ Follow MajorPrep on Twitter: https://twitter.com/MajorPrep1 ►Check out the MajorPrep Amazon Store: https://www.amazon.com/shop/majorprep *************************************************** ► For more information on math, science, and engineering majors, check us out at https://majorprep.com Best Ways to Contact Me: Facebook, twitter, or email ([email protected])
Views: 209261 MajorPrep
Ranjit Kumaresan - Privacy-Preserving Smart Contracts
 
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Ranjit Kumaresan of MIT presents his talk "Privacy-Preserving Smart Contracts" at the DIMACS Workshop on Cryptography and its Interactions: Learning Theory, Coding Theory, and Data Structures. http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/Workshops/Interactions/program.html The workshop on was held from Monday, July 11, 2016 Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at the Computing Research & Education Building on Busch Campus of Rutgers University. For more information visit http://dimacs.rutgers.edu
Views: 380 Rutgers University
How Does a Quantum Computer Work?
 
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For more on spin, check out: http://youtu.be/v1_-LsQLwkA This video was supported by TechNYou: http://bit.ly/19bBX5G A quantum computer works in a totally different way from a classical computer. Quantum bits or 'qubits' can exist in a superposition state of both zero and one simultaneously. This means that a set of two qubits can be in a superposition of four states, which therefore require four numbers to uniquely identify the state. So the amount of information stored in N qubits is two to the power of N classical bits. Thank you to Andrea Morello and UNSW. For more info, check out: http://bit.ly/17wZ7lt
Views: 2937005 Veritasium
Multi-layer architectures for secure communication: information theoretic perspectives
 
01:08:30
In the traditional network hierarchy, reliability and security are handled in different protocol layers. In particular, information is encrypted at the application layer, while lower layers provide an error-free transmission link. Likewise compression is also addressed separately. However, many emerging applications such as wireless ad hoc networks, sensor networks and pay TV systems are vulnerable to new attacks that are not addressed by such separation. In this talk, I will present new architectures in which encryption and source/channel coding are performed jointly, and analyze them within an information theoretic framework. Among other results, we will develop 1) fundamental limits and insights into the role of multiple antennas for protecting confidentiality of information; and 2) source coding techniques for secret key generation and their application to privacy-preserving biometric systems. As will be apparent, good solutions to such problems bring together techniques not only from information theory, but from convex optimization, random matrix theory, signal processing, and graphical models as well. As time permits some recent extensions to joint source and channel coding problems with secrecy constrains will also be discussed.
Views: 23 Microsoft Research
Semantic Security for the Wiretap Channel
 
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Talk at crypto 2012. Authors: Mihir Bellare, Stefano Tessaro, Alexander Vardy. See http://www.iacr.org/cryptodb/data/paper.php?pubkey=24292
Views: 1012 TheIACR
Ilan Komargodski - How to Share a Secret, Infinitely
 
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Ilan Komargodski of the Weizmann Institute of Science presents his talk "How to Share a Secret, Infinitely" at the DIMACS Workshop on Cryptography and its Interactions: Learning Theory, Coding Theory, and Data Structures. http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/Workshops/Interactions/program.html The workshop on was held from Monday, July 11, 2016 Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at the Computing Research & Education Building on Busch Campus of Rutgers University. For more information visit http://dimacs.rutgers.edu
Views: 163 Rutgers University
Theory and Algorithm research group
 
05:01
This video explores the Theory and Algorithm research group at the university of Bristol through an interview with the head of the group, Dr Raphael Clifford.
Views: 103 AzitaGhassemi Media
Juan Garay - Bootstrapping the Blockchain
 
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Juan Garay of Yahoo Labs presents his talk "Bootstrapping the Blockchain" at the DIMACS Workshop on Cryptography and its Interactions: Learning Theory, Coding Theory, and Data Structures. http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/Workshops/Interactions/program.html The workshop on was held from Monday, July 11, 2016 Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at the Computing Research & Education Building on Busch Campus of Rutgers University. For more information visit http://dimacs.rutgers.edu
Views: 232 Rutgers University
The Shannon Limit - Bell Labs - Future Impossible
 
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In 1948, father of communications theory Claude Shannon developed the law that dictated just how much information could ever be communicated down any path, anywhere, using any technology. The maximum rate of this transmission would come to be known as the Shannon Limit. Researchers have spent the following decades trying to achieve this limit and to try to go beyond it.
Views: 5987 Nokia Bell Labs
What is QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean?
 
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What is QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY? What does QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY mean? QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY meaning - QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY definition - QUANTUM CRYPTOGRAPHY explanation. Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Quantum cryptography is the science of exploiting quantum mechanical properties to perform cryptographic tasks. The best known example of quantum cryptography is quantum key distribution which offers an information-theoretically secure solution to the key exchange problem. Currently used popular public-key encryption and signature schemes (e.g., RSA and ElGamal) can be broken by quantum adversaries. The advantage of quantum cryptography lies in the fact that it allows the completion of various cryptographic tasks that are proven or conjectured to be impossible using only classical (i.e. non-quantum) communication (see below for examples). For example, it is impossible to copy data encoded in a quantum state and the very act of reading data encoded in a quantum state changes the state. This is used to detect eavesdropping in quantum key distribution. History: Quantum cryptography uses Heisenberg's uncertainty principle formulated in 1927, and the No-cloning theorem first articulated by Wootters and Zurek and Dieks in 1982. Werner Heisenberg discovered one of the fundamental principles of quantum mechanics: "At the instant at which the position of the electron is known, its momentum therefore can be known only up to magnitudes which correspond to that discontinuous change; thus, the more precisely the position is determined, the less precisely the momentum is known, and conversely” (Heisenberg, 1927: 174–5). This simply means that observation of quanta changes its behavior. By measuring the velocity of quanta we would affect it, and thereby change its position; if we want to find a quant's position, we are forced to change its velocity. Therefore, we cannot measure a quantum system's characteristics without changing it (Clark, n.d.) and we cannot record all characteristics of a quantum system before those characteristics are measured. The No-cloning theorem demonstrates that it is impossible to create a copy of an arbitrary unknown quantum state. This makes unobserved eavesdropping impossible because it will be quickly detected, thus greatly improving assurance that the communicated data remains private. Quantum cryptography was proposed first by Stephen Wiesner, then at Columbia University in New York, who, in the early 1970s, introduced the concept of quantum conjugate coding. His seminal paper titled "Conjugate Coding" was rejected by IEEE Information Theory Society, but was eventually published in 1983 in SIGACT News (15:1 pp. 78–88, 1983). In this paper he showed how to store or transmit two messages by encoding them in two "conjugate observables", such as linear and circular polarization of light, so that either, but not both, of which may be received and decoded. He illustrated his idea with a design of unforgeable bank notes. In 1984, building upon this work, Charles H. Bennett, of the IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and Gilles Brassard, of the Université de Montréal, proposed a method for secure communication based on Wiesner's "conjugate observables", which is now called BB84. In 1991 Artur Ekert developed a different approach to quantum key distribution based on peculiar quantum correlations known as quantum entanglement. Random rotations of the polarization by both parties (usually called Alice and Bob) have been proposed in Kak's three-stage quantum cryptography protocol. In principle, this method can be used for continuous, unbreakable encryption of data if single photons are used. The basic polarization rotation scheme has been implemented. The BB84 method is at the basis of quantum key distribution methods. Companies that manufacture quantum cryptography systems include MagiQ Technologies, Inc. (Boston, Massachusetts, United States), ID Quantique (Geneva, Switzerland), QuintessenceLabs (Canberra, Australia) and SeQureNet (Paris, France).
Views: 1132 The Audiopedia
Romy Minko Holds an MSC in Mathematics of Cryptography and Communications
 
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Romy Minko is an Australia based professional who has extensive professional, volunteer, and research experience.
Views: 9 Romy Minko
Fred Chong: Closing the Gap Between Quantum Algorithms and Hardware
 
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The Yale Quantum Institute welcomes Fred Chong of University of Chicago for a colloquium “Closing the Gap Between Quantum Algorithms and Hardware through Software-Enabled Vertical Integration and Co-Design”. This talk brought together Yale quantum physicists, computer scientists, and electrical engineers. Quantum computing is at an inflection point, where 72-qubit (quantum bit) machines are under test, 100-qubit machines are just around the corner, and even 1000-qubit machines are perhaps only a few years away. These machines have the potential to fundamentally change our concept of what is computable and demonstrate practical applications in areas such as quantum chemistry, optimization, and quantum simulation. Yet a significant resource gap remains between practical quantum algorithms and real machines. Programming, compilation and control will play a key role in increasing the efficiency of algorithms and machines to close this gap. In this video, Fred Chong will outline several grand research challenges in closing this gap, including programming language design, software and hardware verification, defining and perforating abstraction boundaries, cross-layer optimization, managing parallelism and communication, mapping and scheduling computations, reducing control complexity, machine-specific optimizations, learning error patterns, and many more. He will also describe the resources and infrastructure available for starting research in quantum computing and for tackling these challenges. This colloquium is co-sponsored by Yale Computer Science and Electrical Engineering departments.
Views: 845 YaleUniversity
Running an experiment in the IBM Quantum Experience
 
03:53
IBM Research is making quantum computing available to the public for the first time, providing access to a quantum computing platform from any desktop or mobile device via the cloud. Users of the platform called the IBM Quantum Experience can create algorithms and run experiments on an IBM quantum processor, learn about quantum computing through tutorials and simulations, and get inspired by the possibilities of a quantum computer. To learn more about IBM’s quantum computing research and get access to the IBM Quantum Experience please visit: http://ibm.com/quantumcomputing
Views: 156632 IBM Research
The Zipf Mystery
 
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The of and to. A in is I. That it, for you, was with on. As have ... but be they. RELATED LINKS AND SOURCES BELOW! http://www.twitter.com/tweetsauce http://www.instagram.com/electricpants WordCount.org http://www.wordcount.org/ How many days have you been alive? http://www.beatcanvas.com/daysalive.asp random letter generator: http://www.dave-reed.com/Nifty/randSeq.html Dictionary of Obscure Sorrows: https://www.youtube.com/user/obscuresorrows Word frequency resources: [lemmatized] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Most_common_words_in_English http://www.uow.edu.au/~dlee/corpora.htm http://www.wordfrequency.info http://www.anc.org/data/anc-second-release/frequency-data/ http://www.titania.bham.ac.uk/docs/ http://www.kilgarriff.co.uk/bnc-readme.html#raw https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Wiktionary:Frequency_lists http://ucrel.lancs.ac.uk/bncfreq/ [PDF] http://www.wordfrequency.info/files/entries.pdf [combined Wikipedia and Gutenberg] http://www.monlp.com/2012/04/16/calculating-word-and-n-gram-statistics-from-a-wikipedia-corpora/ http://corpus.byu.edu/coca/files/100k_samples.txt http://corpus.byu.edu/ http://corpus.leeds.ac.uk/list.html https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=ja1_AAAAQBAJ&dq=word+frequency+coca&lr= http://www.ling.helsinki.fi/kit/2009s/clt231/NLTK/book/ch01-LanguageProcessingAndPython.html Great Zipf's law papers: http://colala.bcs.rochester.edu/papers/piantadosi2014zipfs.pdf http://www.ling.upenn.edu/~ycharles/sign708.pdf http://arxiv.org/pdf/cond-mat/0412004.pdf http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mejn/courses/2006/cmplxsys899/powerlaws.pdf Zipf’s law articles and discussions: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2002/04/seeing-around-corners/302471/ http://io9.com/the-mysterious-law-that-governs-the-size-of-your-city-1479244159?utm_expid=66866090-48.Ej9760cOTJCPS_Bq4mjoww.0 https://plus.maths.org/content/os/latestnews/may-aug08/food/index http://judson.blogs.nytimes.com/2009/05/19/math-and-the-city/?em https://plus.maths.org/content/mystery-zipf?src=aop http://www.datasciencecentral.com/profiles/blogs/why-zipf-s-law-explains-so-many-big-data-and-physics-phenomenons https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zipf%27s_law https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=f8GrzlnMSm8C&pg=PA62&redir_esc=y#v=onepage&q&f=false http://arxiv.org/pdf/0802.4393v1.pdf http://www.pnas.org/content/108/9/3526.full http://lewisdartnell.com/language_page.htm http://wugology.com/zipfs-law/ other Zipf’s law PDFs http://ftp.iza.org/dp3928.pdf http://arxiv.org/pdf/1402.2965.pdf http://arxiv.org/pdf/1104.3199.pdf http://www.lel.ed.ac.uk/~jim/zipfjrh.pdf http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2834740/#pone.0009411-Mandelbrot1 http://polymer.bu.edu/hes/articles/pgs02a.pdf in untranslated language: http://arxiv.org/pdf/0808.2904.pdf http://pages.stern.nyu.edu/~xgabaix/papers/zipf.pdf http://www.hpl.hp.com/research/idl/papers/ranking/ranking.html http://statweb.stanford.edu/~owen/courses/306a/ZipfAndGutenberg.pdf http://arxiv.org/pdf/1310.0448v3.pdf http://www.kornai.com/Papers/glotto5.pdf Zipf’s law slides: http://www.slideshare.net/guest9fc47a/nlp-new-words Pareto Principle and related ‘laws’: http://www.squawkpoint.com/2013/03/pareto-principle/ http://billyshall.com/blog/post/paretos-principle https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pareto_principle Random typing and Zipf: http://www.longtail.com/the_long_tail/2006/09/is_zipfs_law_ju.html health 80/20: http://archive.ahrq.gov/research/findings/factsheets/costs/expriach/expriach1.html Principle of least effort: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Principle_of_least_effort https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satisficing http://www.pnas.org/content/100/3/788.full.pdf [PDF] http://csiss.org/classics/content/99 self organized criticality: http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fnsys.2014.00166/full Hapax Legomenon: http://campus.albion.edu/english/2011/02/15/hapax-legomenon/ http://www.dailywritingtips.com/is-that-a-hapax-legomenon/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hapax_legomenon [PDF] http://www.aclweb.org/anthology/J10-4003 http://www.wired.com/2012/01/hapax-legomena-and-zipfs-law/ http://oed.hertford.ox.ac.uk/main/content/view/402/450/index.html#_ftn1 http://oed.hertford.ox.ac.uk/main/content/view/36/166/index.html Learning curve: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_curve Forgetting curve: http://www.trainingindustry.com/wiki/entries/forgetting-curve.aspx https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forgetting_curve Experience curve effects: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Experience_curve_effects Forgetting and zipf's law: http://act-r.psy.cmu.edu/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/37JRA_LS_PS_1991.pdf http://public.psych.iastate.edu/shacarp/Wixted_Carpenter_2007.pdf http://marshalljonesjr.com/youll-remember-less-than-001-of-your-life/ https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forgetting https://www.reddit.com/r/Showerthoughts/comments/3gu9qk/it_only_takes_three_generations_for_you_to_be/ music from: http://www.youtube.com/jakechudnow http://www.audionetwork.com
Views: 12943007 Vsauce
Dakshita Khurana - Breaking the Three Round Barrier for Non-malleable Commitments
 
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Dakshita Khurana of UCLA presents her talk "Breaking the Three Round Barrier for Non-malleable Commitments" at the DIMACS Workshop on Cryptography and its Interactions: Learning Theory, Coding Theory, and Data Structures. http://dimacs.rutgers.edu/Workshops/Interactions/program.html The workshop on was held from Monday, July 11, 2016 Wednesday, July 13, 2016 at the Computing Research & Education Building on Busch Campus of Rutgers University. For more information visit http://dimacs.rutgers.edu
Views: 820 Rutgers University

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