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Olympic Dam mine expansion- Environmental impacts of tailings & water by Dr Gavin Mudd - Pt 2
 
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http://cuttlefishcountry.com BHP Billiton's Olympic Dam mine is massive and destined to become the biggest open cut mine in the world. Naturally, with massive mines come massive impacts... environmentally, socially and economically. Widely published environmental engineer Dr Gavin Mudd (Monash University) gives this presentation on the impact the mining operation will have from the desert to the sea, and beyond through the export of dangerous radioactive materials. Tailings dams will leak radioactive waste into the earth in the South Australian desert, the water drawn from the Great Artesian Basin will continue to dry natural mound springs, threaten pastoral and agricultural bores and endanger arid zone ecology and indigenous sacred sites. Dr Gavin Mudd delivered this presentation in Adelaide, South Australia on October 9th, 2011... the day before the mega-mine project received environmental approval from both State and Federal Governments. You can find out more at http://cuttlefishcountry.com
Views: 503 danimations
Mine expansion in court over climate change impact
 
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Environmental groups are attempting to prove the effects of climate change would be worsened by the expansion of a coal mine at Ulan in the NSW Hunter Valley.
SA Premier on the impact of BHP's mine expansion deferral
 
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SA Premier Jay Weatherill says the Government will meet mining industry representatives about the impact of BHP Billiton's decision to defer any Olympic Dam mine expansion.
Waratah Rivulet... Our drinking water in crisis
 
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What happens when you longwall mine coal from beneath a major water supply? Longwall mining extracts coal in vast panels typically 2 -- 4 km long and 200 -- 400 m wide. This process often disrupts aquifers and causes widespread subsidence on the surface. In December 2011, representatives from several local community groups made an approved site visit to Waratah Rivulet, a major contributor to the drinking water of Southern Sydney & Northern Illawarra. What they found was beyond belief... a broken river, a mining company pumping tons of plastic resin in to glue it back together, and our drinking water in crisis. The NSW Government has since approved further longwall mining under our water catchment and this same area is now targeted for massive industrialisation from coal seam gas drilling. How many of the millions of voters who drink this water are aware of the situation? Further information and imagery of our drinking water in crisis can be found here: http://riverssos.org.au/mining-in-nsw/waratah-rivulet/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/friendsofthestonefly/sets/72157628325885297/
What's Left Behind from Mining
 
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A toxic pile of waste left behind from a nearby coal mine that is dumped on the south side of Back Bone Mountain in Garrett County Maryland. There are toxic levels of arsenic in this "gob pile." If you look behind you can see the wind turbines on the ridge of the mountain.
Views: 271 Joanne Morrison
A Brief Documentary on Boropukuria Coal Mine Project
 
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Barapukuria coal mine is an underground coal mine at Barapukuria in the Dinajpur District in Bangladesh. The mine is operated by Barapukuria Coal Mining Co. Ltd (BCMCL), the coal mining subsidiary of Petrobangla, a government owned oil, gas and mining company.The U.S. Geological Suervey reports that "the coal mine had a production capacity of 1 Mt/yr of coal. Coal extraction was by long-wall mining. The coal was delivered to a thermal powerplant.
Views: 1637 Explore Media
Opportunities and Challenges of the Mining Industry
 
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Mark Cutifani, CEO of AngloGold Ashanti, discusses the challenges and opportunities facing the gold producer as well as the mining industry.
Views: 89 ICOSA MEDIA
Destruction of the swamps
 
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A flash animation for Total Environment Centre to raise awareness about the dangers posed to swamps by long-wall mining. I did all the swamp animation and contributed to some of the mining section as well.
Views: 44 Laura Raphael
Dr. Michel Aubertin: Mine Wastes Management @RIME Part 2
 
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Dr. Michel Aubertin continues his keynote presentation at the Tailings and Mine Waste conference by completing his description of the hydrology and hydraulic conductivities of rock waste piles (the impact of inclining compacted layers). He describes what "diversion length" means in getting infiltration water directed to the non-reactive material at the edge of the waste rock pile. Benches and exposed terraces are the new concepts being explored. Cemented paste backfill (returning waste rock and tailings to underground mines) is discussed, as well as the effect of the filling rate. Aubertin explains: oxidation of tailings has shown that reactive tailings can be used as backfill; the geotechnical behaviour of sludges in impoundments has been described. He also discusses a variety of work on covers on top of tailings to prevent oxidation of reactive tailings (to eliminate acid mine drainage). He discusses the submerged water table model for long term storage of reactive tailings versus water cap tailings ponds and summarizes the projects ongoing at RIME. Dr. Aubertin's keynote presentation was a part of the Tailings and Mine Waste conference in Banff, Alberta on November 5, 2013.
Views: 1379 LanduseKN
Mine Rehabilitation Studies
 
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Warwick Fegan talks about his honours project at CMLR.
Views: 515 CMLReducation
Coal Mine Expansion Alarms Neighbors
 
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Neighbors of the King Coal Mine in southwest La Plata County have asked for a formal environmental impact study before the county approves a land-use permit for the 70-year-old mine’s surface operations on County Road 120. But their demands may be moot. The U.S. Bureau of Land Management is expected to release the findings of an environmental assessment study this month. The study analyzes the mine’s application to expand its underground operations by nearly a thousand acres.
Views: 318 Durango TV
The Green Room with John Holden
 
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"Our next story takes us here, to the middle of the wilderness in the Appalachian area of the United States, where -- would you believe -- this stream, the forest, the wildlife, all of this used to be a working coal mine."
Views: 1041 TruthSurfaceMining
Protests in Kenya over plans to introduce new coal mines
 
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(5 Jun 2018) Dozens of activists opposed to the development of coal-fired power plants took to the streets of Nairobi on Tuesday. A Chinese company is tipped to help finance and construct the proposed plant in the historic port town of Lamu, whose old town is a listed UNESCO World Heritage site. There are also plans to develop plants at Mui Basin in Kitui county. Kenyan government officials say the plants will help meet the country's growing electricity demands. Critics say the plans goes against Kenya's commitment to comply with its Paris climate accord targets. Activists worry coal mining would damage marine resources and pollute the environment. "Coal plants, the usage of coal, is an outdated technology, which is not clean," said activist Faisal Mohammed. The executive director at Haki Africa, a human rights organisation, said China is not acting in solidarity with Kenya in pursuing the constructions. "China is here for its own personal benefit. It is unfortunate that our country and our government is accepting to be lied to and to be cheated by China," said Hussein Khalid. Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Archive Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/APArchives Google+: https://plus.google.com/b/102011028589719587178/+APArchive​ Tumblr: https://aparchives.tumblr.com/​​ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/APNews/ You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/fced1cb67683986a5b4d0f4fd7e57346
Views: 121 AP Archive
Lecture 37 - Geologic Hazards Subsidence , Collapsible Soils
 
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Lecture Series on Engineering Geology by Prof.Debasis Roy , Department of Civil Engineering IIT Kharagpur. For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 10173 nptelhrd
Coal Mine And Sydney’s Drinking Water Catchment  - Buckingham 14 September 2016
 
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Protecting Sydney’s drinking water catchment from pollution That this house 1. notes that: a) Centennial Coal’s Springvale coal mine can discharge up to 19 million litres of polluted water each day into the Cox’s River, which flows into Warragamba Dam – Sydney’s drinking water supply; b) that under the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979, Section 34B, development in the Sydney water catchment cannot be approved “unless the consent authority is satisfied that the carrying out of the proposed development would have a neutral or beneficial effect on the quality of water”; c) on 13 September 2016, the Land and Environment Court dismissed a challenge to the Planning Assessment Commission approval relating to the Springvale coal mine, despite the mine significantly polluting Sydney’s drinking water catchment. 2. expresses its concern that the law requiring development in Sydney’s drinking water catchment to have a ‘neutral or beneficial’ impact on water quality does not seem to effective. 3. calls on the government to strengthen laws and planning policies designed to protect Sydney’s drinking water catchment from pollution.
Views: 44 Jeremy Buckingham
The Mine Subsidence Board - About Us
 
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The Mine Subsidence Board is a service organisation operating for the community in coal mining areas of New South Wales, Australia, and is responsible for administering the Mine Subsidence Compensation Act. Our mission is to mitigate the effects of mine subsidence on the community by promoting compatibility between surface developments and underground coal mining, restoring damaged improvements and managing the compensation fund. for more information visit our website www.minesub.nsw.gov.au
Views: 904 MineSubBoard
COAL: The documentary
 
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The Northwest is square in the middle of a controversial global debate: Should the region build export terminals that would open lucrative markets for the world's dirtiest fossil fuel? As the U.S. economy continues to struggle, can the country afford not to? COAL is a KCTS 9 and EarthFix original documentary. For more information on the documentary, visit: kcts9.org/coal or earthfix.us/coaldoc. For ongoing reporting on Coal in the Northwest, visit EarthFix: earthfix.info/coal/ Credits Written, Directed and Produced by Katie Campbell Photography by Michael Werner Katie Campbell Editor Michael Werner Narrator Katie Campbell EarthFix reporters Ashley Ahearn Bonnie Stewart Amelia Templeton Courtney Flatt Cassandra Profita Aaron Kunz Aerial photography by Katie Campbell Aerial support provided by Christopher Boyer, LightHawk Hunter Handsfield, LightHawk Additional photography Aaron Kunz Stock Footage - RevoStock Audio post production Milt Ritter Post Production Support Lisa Strube-Kilgore Phil Williams Chris Maske Music Lonely Rails Written by Seth Warren and C. Andrew Rohrmann. Performed by Seth Warren. Published by Sciencelab. Salt Flats Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Like a Phoenix Written by Steve Carter. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Celtic Mist Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. Pistola Written by Geoff Levin. Published by ZFC Music. Fluttering Leaves Written by Daniel Pemberton. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Couple Written by Al Lethbridge. Published by BBC Production Music. Halcyon Skies Written by Ben Hales and Matt Hales. Published by Chappell Recorded Music Library Ltd. The Loner Written by Miguel D'Oliveira. Published by BBC Production Music. Special Thanks to Dustin Bleizeffer Shannon Anderson LightHawk Keith Williams Thunder Basin Coal Company Leroy Rohde Andy Rohrmann Tom Lubnau Columbia River Pilots Aaron Toso Courtney Wallace Lauri Hennessey
Views: 156073 EarthFixMedia
The REAL Secrets!
 
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http://riverssos.org.au/ Members from 11 environmental and community groups met at the Warragamba Dam Visitors' Centre yesterday to display photos of serious pollution and damage to river systems in the supposedly highly protected Special Areas of Sydney's drinking water catchment. The display outside the entrance, for the benefit of over 100 visitors, showed evidence of cracked river beds, dried-out swamps and waterfalls, and polluted water. The event was organised by Rivers SLS and Lock the Gate in response to the Centre's photo exhibition, entitled Secrets of the Special Areas, which fails to show any of the real secrets: the damage being done by underground coal mines. Many of those attending were also concerned over plans for coal seam gas operations in the Special Areas in future, which would compound the impacts on water quality and quantity. If the government of NSW continues to put the royalties they receive from mining and CSG companies above the health of Greater Sydney's water supply, then these groups vow to escalate their protests. More on the Waratah Rivulet - http://youtu.be/b_tZrN-nLo8 Photos - http://www.flickr.com/photos/tony_markham/sets/72157634830418507/
Views: 71 Tony Markham
Mining
 
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Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 255 encyclopediacc
MAP COAL MINE   MAHAN   TECHNICAL DISCUSSION AT GROUND ZERO
 
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15th July 2016...MAP COAL MINE MAHAN TECHNICAL DISCUSSION AT GROUND ZERO
Views: 93 Sanjay Kher
Environmentalists, Miners Square Off In Coal Country
 
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An anti-coal battle is brewing in the heart of southwestern Pennsylvania’s coal country; KDKA's Andy Sheehan reports.
Views: 50 CBS Pittsburgh
研究發現采礦正危及悉尼集水地水流安全
 
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【環球網綜合報道】據澳大利亞悉尼先驅晨報8月20日報道,悉尼集水地附近的煤礦開采對水流已產生瞭“逐漸累積並有可能加速”的影響,但是因缺少監控技術,其產生的全部影響還始終是未知數。 這些都是2016年悉尼直飲水源的審計報告的調查結果,這個調查每三年進行一次,現在也只有其中的一部分報告可供借閱。這項調研涵蓋瞭從發源於藍山地區的利特高到庫馬附近約16000平方千米的流域面積,儲存水量約260萬兆升。與2013年的報告相比,2016年的調研發現“可用水源減少瞭”。 據研究表明,水域變化的趨勢並不是單一的,部分水域變好,但其他水域惡化。其中位於沃勒甘巴壩的悉尼主要水庫佈拉格蘭湖,是地表徑流中情況最不佳的一個。由於用於采礦和其他用途的抽水量不斷增加,周邊濕地的情況已經有所惡化。同時受叢林大火影響的地區抽水量也有“顯著的上升”。報告指出,因地下采煤活動的累積影響,造成的地表徑流的不定量減少已經成為瞭一個日益重要的問題。 新南威爾士大學土木與環境工程學院的教授斯圖亞特•卡恩表示,從這個趨勢中人們可以看出佈拉格蘭湖的現狀“十分堪憂”。過去的二十年以來,其中用來測量水的含鹽度的導電率在不斷下降,與此同時,水質參數中的氮在上升和溶解氧也在下降。通常來說,水中氮和溶解氧的這類變化與水質污染有密切關係。 卡恩教授指出:“長期水域減小的湖有時會鹽度惡化,其中的鹽分和氮含量的變化反映瞭從類似煤礦產業和農業等其他領域產生的污染上升瞭。”2007年時,悉尼水域就遭受瞭藍藻爆發的污染。“如果放任水中氮含量不斷上升,我們會讓自己在未來面臨更大規模的藍藻爆發的危險”。他還補充道,我們“急需”科技來瞭解氮,並發展更有效的控製方法。 新州的環保人士MehreenFaruqi也說,繼續允許悉尼的長壁煤礦開采是“不負責任的”。“這些礦山附近的河流已經失去瞭地下水的獲得,這對它們的流動和濕地保護結果產生瞭重大影響。”(實習編譯:王悅審稿:譚利婭)According to the Sydney Morning Herald Morning News reported on August 20, the Sydney catchment near the coal mining has produced a "gradual accumulation and may accelerate the" impact, but due to lack of monitoring technology, the resulting All the impact is always unknown.These are the findings of the audit report of the direct drinking water in Sydney in 2016. This survey is conducted every three years and only a part of the report is available for borrowing. The survey covers about 16,000 square kilometers of watershed from the Littra highlands near the Blue Mountains area, and about 2.6 million liters of water. Compared with the 2013 report, the 2016 survey found that "available water is reduced."According to the study, the trend of water changes is not a single, part of the waters become better, but other waters deteriorate. Which is located in the Wolle Gamba Dam, Sydney's main reservoir, Lake Prague, is the worst of the surface runoff. As the pumping capacity for mining and other uses continues to increase, the surrounding wetlands have deteriorated. At the same time by the jungle fire affected area pumping also has a "significant rise." The report noted that the reduction in surface runoff due to the cumulative effects of underground coal mining activities has become an increasingly important issue.Professor Stuart Kahn, a professor at the Faculty of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New South Wales, says that from this trend people can see the status quo of Lake Prague is "very worrying." Over the past two decades, the conductivity used to measure the salinity of water has been declining, and at the same time, nitrogen in the water quality parameters is also rising and dissolved oxygen is also declining. In general, such changes in nitrogen and dissolved oxygen in water are closely related to water pollution.Professor Kahn pointed out: "Long-term waters to reduce the lake sometimes salinity deterioration, which changes in salt and nitrogen content reflects the coal industry and other areas such as agriculture caused by pollution increased." 2007, Sydney The waters suffered the outbreak of cyanobacteria. "If you let the water content of nitrogen rising, we will let ourselves in the future face of a greater risk of cyanobacteria outbreak." He also added that we "need" technology to understand the nitrogen, and the development of more effective control methods.New state environmentalists MehreenFaruqi also said it would continue to allow Sydney's longwall coal mining to be "irresponsible". "The rivers near these mines have lost access to groundwater, which has had a significant impact on their flow and wetland protection." (Internship Compilation: Wang Yue Review: Tan Liya)
Views: 1 Nationalnews TV
Four Mile Creek (tributary) damage
 
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I was noting how clean and clear the water looked before I found this point on the stream where it appears to be affected by some kind of damage. At two points where the clean water flows in you can notice a clear section. At another point where there is no clear part, water can be seem percolating up from below.
Views: 61 Tony Markham
BHP Billiton   Telescopic Handler
 
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Stephan Fourie from BHP Billiton talks about telescopic handlers their ability to handle conveyor belts and execute other general functions. http://www.manitou.co.za/Product/maniscopic.htm
Views: 219 ManitouSA
XSTRATA COAL SOUTH AFRICA TWEEFONTEIN OPTIMISATION PROJECT (TOP) INDUCTION PART TWO OF TWO
 
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Part Two of the above Induction, please watch in conjunction with Part One. Television production by Paul Tilsley and Competent Artistes www.competentartistes.tv
Views: 252 Paul Tilsley
[Legislative Council] 2R - Environmental P & A Amendment (Sydney Drinking Water Catchment) Bill 2017
 
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11 October 2017 Legislative Council, NSW Parliament 2nd Reading Speech - Environmental Planning & Assessment Amendment (Sydney Drinking Water Catchment) Bill 2017 The Hon. ADAM SEARLE ( 20:31 ): I lead for the Labor Opposition in debate on the Environmental Planning and Assessment Amendment (Sydney Drinking Water Catchment) Bill 2017. I state at the outset that the Labor Opposition will be supporting the measures in this bill that secure the supply of electricity to the State. The problem this State is facing is largely one of the Government's own making—a theme that I will develop during my contribution. The object of the bill before the House is to amend the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act 1979 and the State Environmental Planning Policy (Sydney Drinking Water Catchment) 2011 to do three things. First, it will validate the development consent granted on 21 September 2015 relating to the Springvale mine extension. The Labor Opposition wholeheartedly supports this measure. Secondly, the bill will validate any other development consent that would have been valid under the test as the bill purports to clarify, or in reality will have been changed by, this legislation. Thirdly, the legislation claims to be clarifying the application of the neutral or beneficial water quality test, the so-called NorBE test, in the case of a development application for the continuation of development under an existing development consent relating to the Sydney drinking water catchment. However, in reality it is not clarifying the application of that test; it is changing the law. It is changing the State environmental planning policy and it is changing the authorising legislation in section 34B of the Environmental Planning and Assessment Act. The Labor Opposition does not support the second and third measures for reasons that I will outline. We will move amendments that seek to remove those provisions from the bill. It is useful to understand how we came to be in this situation. Springvale is an underground mine about 15 kilometres north-west of Lithgow, near the Blue Mountains where I live. I am happy to declare that interest. It undermines the Newnes State Forest on the edge of the Blue Mountains World Heritage area. It mines 4.5 million tonnes of coal per year, using longwall techniques and supplies coal, as the Minister outlined, to Mount Piper power station, as well as to the Port Kembla coal export terminal. As the Minister also outlined, in recent years several other mines in the area that could have supplied coal to Mount Piper have closed, as has the Wallerawang power station. Springvale is now the only local source of coal for Mount Piper and, with that power station, is the largest local employer. The mine and the power station each employ roughly 300 full-time equivalent staff—600 in total. That is without taking into account the so-called downstreaming effects of the expenditure of local incomes in the local economy. Taking a conservative estimate, if those jobs were to be taken out of the local economy the direct hit for local businesses would probably be something like $15 million and the multiplying effect could be as high as $100 million. On any analysis, that would be devastating to not only the social fabric of the community but also the local economy. In 2006 the Environment Protection Authority [EPA] instructed the mine to begin transferring wastewater to Wallerawang Power Station for treatment and reuse to avoid dumping it in the Sydney drinking water upper catchment and the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. When Wallerawang closed in November 2014, the water treatment plant was decommissioned and the environment protection licence for the mine was altered to allow the water to be discharged instead. Springvale is now licensed to discharge 19 megalitres of water from its discharge point into Sawyers Swamp Creek and the Coxs River—the second largest stream flowing into the Warragamba Dam, which supplies Sydney's drinking water. This water comes from the coal seams being mined. It is highly saline and contains heavy metals. On a number of occasions the EPA has found Springvale to be in breach of its licence for exceeding limits on various forms of discharge, not only saline..... FULL TRANSCRIPT AT https://www.parliament.nsw.gov.au/Hansard/Pages/HansardResult.aspx#/docid/HANSARD-1820781676-74547/link/95
Views: 14 Adam Searle MLC
Robot
 
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A robot is a mechanical or virtual artificial agent, usually an electro-mechanical machine that is guided by a computer program or electronic circuitry. Robots can be autonomous or semi-autonomous and range from humanoids such as Honda's Advanced Step in Innovative Mobility (ASIMO) and TOSY's TOSY Ping Pong Playing Robot (TOPIO) to industrial robots, collectively programmed swarm robots, and even microscopic nano robots. By mimicking a lifelike appearance or automating movements, a robot may convey a sense of intelligence or thought of its own. The branch of technology that deals with the design, construction, operation, and application of robots, as well as computer systems for their control, sensory feedback, and information processing is robotics. These technologies deal with automated machines that can take the place of humans in dangerous environments or manufacturing processes, or resemble humans in appearance, behavior, and/or cognition. Many of today's robots are inspired by nature contributing to the field of bio-inspired robotics. These robots have also created a newer branch of robotics: Soft robotics. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 157 Audiopedia
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 23 wikipedia tts
Damage to Nepean River N.S.W by mining
 
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This video was taken January 2013 at Douglas Park. My family & i canoe up this river & picnic on the banks.We have been doing this for many years now.We were shocked when we come across this.this is not the only area effected.
Views: 134 Leonie Head
Stephen O'Dowd, CSIRO - SME Engagement Centre, Partners in Technology Briefing - 7 October 2011
 
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On 7 October, the CSIRO SME Engagement Centre gave an overview of its activities with the business community. The event attracted more than 140 Queensland ICT industry representatives. Speakers' presentations are available from http://ict.industry.qld.gov.au/events/241.htm For more info on the Partners in Technology briefings, visit http://ict.industry.qld.gov.au/events/242.htm Connect with us: https://www.facebook.com/DigitalEconomyQld Disclaimer: The content contained in the Partners in Technology videos by both the Queensland Government and non-government organisations, is made available for historical purposes only. The content was true and current at the date of publishing, but may not be true or current now or reflect the current policies, positions, views and directions of the Queensland Government or other presenting organisations. Please note that government content published before 14 February 2015 was produced by previous governments.
Views: 194 Digital Queensland
Appalachia | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:17:50
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Appalachia Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Appalachia () is a cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York to northern Alabama and Georgia. While the Appalachian Mountains stretch from Belle Isle in Canada to Cheaha Mountain in Alabama, the cultural region of Appalachia typically refers only to the central and southern portions of the range, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, southwesterly to the Great Smoky Mountains. As of the 2010 United States Census, the region was home to approximately 25 million people.Since its recognition as a distinctive region in the late 19th century, Appalachia has been a source of enduring myths and distortions regarding the isolation, temperament, and behavior of its inhabitants. Early 20th century writers often engaged in yellow journalism focused on sensationalistic aspects of the region's culture, such as moonshining and clan feuding, and often portrayed the region's inhabitants as uneducated and prone to impulsive acts of violence. Sociological studies in the 1960s and 1970s helped to re-examine and dispel these stereotypes.While endowed with abundant natural resources, Appalachia has long struggled and been associated with poverty. In the early 20th century, large-scale logging and coal mining firms brought wage-paying jobs and modern amenities to Appalachia, but by the 1960s the region had failed to capitalize on any long-term benefits from these two industries. Beginning in the 1930s, the federal government sought to alleviate poverty in the Appalachian region with a series of New Deal initiatives, such as the construction of dams to provide cheap electricity and the implementation of better farming practices. On March 9, 1965, the Appalachian Regional Commission was created to further alleviate poverty in the region, mainly by diversifying the region's economy and helping to provide better health care and educational opportunities to the region's inhabitants. By 1990, Appalachia had largely joined the economic mainstream, but still lagged behind the rest of the nation in most economic indicators.
Views: 21 wikipedia tts
Appalachia | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:17:50
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Appalachia Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Appalachia () is a cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York to northern Alabama and Georgia. While the Appalachian Mountains stretch from Belle Isle in Canada to Cheaha Mountain in Alabama, the cultural region of Appalachia typically refers only to the central and southern portions of the range, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, southwesterly to the Great Smoky Mountains. As of the 2010 United States Census, the region was home to approximately 25 million people.Since its recognition as a distinctive region in the late 19th century, Appalachia has been a source of enduring myths and distortions regarding the isolation, temperament, and behavior of its inhabitants. Early 20th century writers often engaged in yellow journalism focused on sensationalistic aspects of the region's culture, such as moonshining and clan feuding, and often portrayed the region's inhabitants as uneducated and prone to impulsive acts of violence. Sociological studies in the 1960s and 1970s helped to re-examine and dispel these stereotypes.While endowed with abundant natural resources, Appalachia has long struggled and been associated with poverty. In the early 20th century, large-scale logging and coal mining firms brought wage-paying jobs and modern amenities to Appalachia, but by the 1960s the region had failed to capitalize on any long-term benefits from these two industries. Beginning in the 1930s, the federal government sought to alleviate poverty in the Appalachian region with a series of New Deal initiatives, such as the construction of dams to provide cheap electricity and the implementation of better farming practices. On March 9, 1965, the Appalachian Regional Commission was created to further alleviate poverty in the region, mainly by diversifying the region's economy and helping to provide better health care and educational opportunities to the region's inhabitants. By 1990, Appalachia had largely joined the economic mainstream, but still lagged behind the rest of the nation in most economic indicators.
Views: 26 wikipedia tts
Appalachia | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:13:44
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Appalachia 00:02:01 1 Defining the Appalachian region 00:04:30 1.1 Etymology and pronunciation 00:06:53 2 History 00:07:02 2.1 Early history 00:10:04 2.2 The Appalachian frontier 00:12:14 2.3 Early 19th century 00:13:44 2.4 The U.S. Civil War 00:16:34 2.5 Late 19th and early 20th centuries 00:16:44 2.5.1 Economic boom 00:17:57 2.5.2 Stereotypes 00:19:32 2.5.3 Feuds 00:20:32 2.6 Modern Appalachia 00:22:46 3 Cities 00:23:28 4 Culture 00:23:37 4.1 Ethnic groups 00:26:14 4.2 Religion 00:28:26 4.3 Dialect 00:29:23 4.4 Education 00:31:03 4.5 Music 00:32:37 4.6 Literature 00:36:32 4.7 Folklore 00:39:03 4.8 Urban Appalachians 00:40:02 4.9 Communications 00:41:03 4.10 Appalachian studies 00:41:49 5 Economy 00:42:13 5.1 Agriculture 00:44:42 5.2 Logging 00:47:07 5.3 Coal mining 00:50:27 5.4 Manufacturing 00:52:46 5.5 Tourism 00:55:18 5.6 Poverty in Appalachia 00:58:52 5.7 Tax revenue and absentee land ownership 01:02:01 5.8 Appalachian Regional Commission 01:04:16 5.9 Transportation 01:06:13 6 Popular culture 01:11:42 6.1 'Appalachia' as the United States 01:12:44 7 Physiographic provinces 01:13:13 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Appalachia () is a cultural region in the Eastern United States that stretches from the Southern Tier of New York to northern Alabama and Georgia. While the Appalachian Mountains stretch from Belle Isle in Canada to Cheaha Mountain in Alabama, the cultural region of Appalachia typically refers only to the central and southern portions of the range, from the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, southwesterly to the Great Smoky Mountains. As of the 2010 United States Census, the region was home to approximately 25 million people.Since its recognition as a distinctive region in the late 19th century, Appalachia has been a source of enduring myths and distortions regarding the isolation, temperament, and behavior of its inhabitants. Early 20th century writers often engaged in yellow journalism focused on sensationalistic aspects of the region's culture, such as moonshining and clan feuding, and often portrayed the region's inhabitants as uneducated and prone to impulsive acts of violence. Sociological studies in the 1960s and 1970s helped to re-examine and dispel these stereotypes.While endowed with abundant natural resources, Appalachia has long struggled and been associated with poverty. In the early 20th century, large-scale logging and coal mining firms brought wage-paying jobs and modern amenities to Appalachia, but by the 1960s the region had failed to capitalize on any long-term benefits from these two industries. Beginning in the 1930s, the federal government sought to alleviate poverty in the Appalachian region with a series of New Deal initiatives, such as the construction of dams to provide cheap electricity and the implementation of better farming practices. On March 9, 1965, the Appalachian Regional Commission was created to further alleviate poverty in the region, mainly by diversifying the region's economy and helping to provide better health care and educational opportunities to the region's inhabitants. By 1990, Appalachia had largely joined the economic mainstream, but still lagged behind the rest of the nation in most economic indicators.
Views: 9 wikipedia tts

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