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Burra Cornish mining history, episode 2 - World Heritage wonder near Adelaide
 
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Traveltherenext: http://www.youtube.com/ChristinaPfeiffer Burra is a historic town in Australia. Its has a collection of well-preserved heritage buildings and mining ruins, The successful copper mining town saved South Australia from bankruptcy in the late 1800s. Perhaps it should be on the UNESCO World Heritage list. www. is a travel show hosted by award-winning travel writer and photographer, Christina Pfeiffer, who has visited 55 countries in the last eight years. YouTube channel: http://www.youtube.com/user/ChristinaPfeiffer Subscribe here: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ChristinaPfeiffer Burra Cornish mining history, episode 2 - World Heritage wonder near Adelaide Burra Cornish mining history, episode 2 - World Heritage wonder near Adelaide For places to visit and things to do around the world go to https://travel2next.com/ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Whale Watching Hervey Bay - Humpback Capital of the World" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jUoBrPAYbTA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
TWENTIETH CENTURY KALGOORLIE W AUSTRALIA HISTORY GOLD MINING TRANSPORT BUILDINGS
 
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ONE OF A SERIES ON KALGOORLIE SEE http://video.google.com.au/videosearch?q=DON+PUGH+KALGOORLIE History KAL WESTERN AUSTRALIA In June 1893, prospectors Patrick (Paddy) Hannan, Tom Flanagan, and Dan O'Shea were travelling to Mt Youle when one of their horses cast a shoe. During the resultant halt in their journey, the men noticed signs of gold in the area, and decided to stay put. On June 17, 1893, Hannan filed a Reward Claim, leading to hundreds of men swarming to the area in search of gold and Kalgoorlie was born. The mining of gold, along with other metals such as nickel, has been a major industry in Kalgoorlie ever since. The concentrated area of large gold mines surrounding the original Hannan find is often referred to as the Golden Mile, and is considered by some to be the richest square mile of earth on the planet. The town's population was about 30,000 people in 1903. The narrow gauge Government railway line reached Kalgoorlie in the 1896, and the main named railway service from Perth was the overnight sleeper train The Westland which ran until the 1970s. In 1917, a standard gauge railway line was completed, connecting Kalgoorlie to the city of Port Augusta, South Australia, across 2000 km of desert, and consequently the rest of the eastern states. The standardisation of the railway connecting Perth (which changed route from the narrow gauge route) in 1968 made it possible for rail travel from Perth to Sydney - and the Indian Pacific rail service commenced soon after. Places, famous or infamous, that Kalgoorlie is noted for include its water pipeline, designed by C. Y. O'Connor, which brings in fresh water from Mundaring Weir near Perth; its Hay Street brothels (the street itself was apparently named after Hay Street, Perth); its two-up school; the goldfields railway loopline; the Kalgoorlie Town Hall; the Paddy Hannan statue/drinking fountain; the Super Pit; and Mt Charlotte lookout. Its main street is Hannan Street, named after the town's founder. The town of Kalgoorlie and the shire of Boulder amalgamated on February 1, 1989 to become the city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kalgoorlie DON PUGH producer: Don Pugh
Views: 4924 Donald Pugh
The Sir Terry Pratchett Memorial Scholarship - University of South Australia
 
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Honouring the memory of the best-selling author and friend of UniSA. The unique perpetual scholarship launched by Sir Terry’s Business Manager, Robert Wilkins, will benefit future generations of students and is the largest of its kind in the history of UniSA.
The Australian Gold Rush
 
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This is an educational video for Stage 3 students studying HSIE in NSW schools under the old HSIE BOS NSW Syllabus. This content is still relevant to the national curriculum, under the History K-10 Syllabus. This video introduces events that had a significant impact on shaping Australia and its colonies. Students develop an understanding regarding the evolution of the colonies and early migration to Australia in the 19th century (See ACHHK095 & ACHHK096). The purpose of this video was to be used in conjunction with an IGASAR (a process model for inquiry) learning sequence as part of a university assessment for unit EDSS223 at the University of New England (UNE), Armidale NSW.
Views: 85232 Drew Smith
Australian nightlife, Documentary, Amazing Documentary
 
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Those wild nights that ended in a toilet cubicle, the first strip club you entered, the five teapots of cocktails consumed at World Bar, the meat pie from a convenience store as you waited for hours for the first morning train. Savour them in your memory, it's time to say good bye to the king of debauchery, Kings Cross. You can only hold on to your 20s for so long, but fear not, grown Sydneysider, if history has taught us anything, the Cross will live again. Somehow, one day. There has been talk in recent years about the impending final farewell as the red lights turned off, the nightclub lights turned on and more recently, the streets became still and quiet after midnight. But we didn't want to believe it, Kings Cross, we shook our heads and took another shot. At the beginning of 2014, the New South Wales government enforced strict laws on late-night establishments in certain areas of Sydney, including 1.30 a.m. lockouts and 3 a.m. last drinks. Many business owners in the red light and party district claimed it was the nail in the coffin. As revellers found another place to party, many iconic establishments throughout The Cross closed their doors and the properties housing institutions Candy's Apartment and World Bar went up for sale. #australian #nightlife
Finding Our Past - Convict Coal Mines of Newcastle
 
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NBN Broadcast 26th September 2005 when the University of Newcastle's Coal River Working Party drilled into the ancient convict coal mines of Newcastle Australia. More info: http://coalriver.wordpress.com
Views: 2186 UoNCC
Master of Ore Deposit Geology
 
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Master of Ore Deposit Geology
Grand Challenges for Engineering in Mining - Prof. Ismet Canbulat
 
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Subscribe to AboutUNSW if you are a current or prospective student https://www.youtube.com/user/UNSWCommunity The 2015 Kenneth Finlay Memorial Lecture "Grand Challenges for Engineering in Mining" is presented by Professor Ismet Canbulat. This lecture is also presented as part of the UNSW Vice Chancellor's Professorial Inaugural Lecture Series. Synopsis Mining is an inherently challenging multifaceted industry with complex interactions between different disciplines - from exploration of reserves to processing of ore. At the times of high commodity prices some of those challenges were not recognised or simply ignored. Today, the challenges in mining are greater than ever before with increasing costs and decreasing commodity prices, and those challenges are becoming critical today for the survival of mining companies. There have also been many great engineering achievements in mining that made the necessary step-change in safety, productivity and sustainability. But more engineering innovations are required rapidly. This presentation will highlight those engineering challenges that will need to be solved for sustainable mining in the 21st century. About the Speaker Dr Ismet Canbulat has been Professor and Chair of Kenneth Finlay Chair of Rock Mechanics since December 2014. He has 24 years of research, consultancy, management and on-site experience in Turkey, South Africa and Australia. He has a BSc Mining Engineering, MSc and PhD degrees in Mining/Rock Engineering. About UNSW is the place to explore what's on offer at UNSW Australia (the University of New South Wales), a powerhouse of cutting-edge research and teaching in the Asia-Pacific based in Sydney. For more information: www.unsw.edu.au https://www.facebook.com/unsw Twitter @unsw
Views: 198 AboutUNSW
Walk the Mining Road
 
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Walk the Mining Road is a video produced by the Minerals Council of Australia in partnership with BHP Billiton that highlights the importance of women in our industry and the many opportunities available to school leavers and university students in mining.
Gender diversity in mining and resources
 
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"The research, the requirements and the reality: Gender diversity within the mining and resources industry." Presented by the Centre for Human Resource Management and WIMnet South Australia.
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
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Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 3460 GeologicalSociety
Arid Recovery - This is our story - TV Ad
 
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Ecologist Helen Crisp holds one of Australia's most endangered species, the Western Barred Bandicoot, just before releasing it back into the wild. "You're going to be famous little one", she says. With the support of Australian Mining, so too will the ground breaking research conducted by Helen and the team at Arid Recovery. This world-class conservation and research program started back in 1997, and was an idea born from some passionate individuals in the environmental department at the nearby mine. Arid Recovery is now an independent, not-for-profit conservation initiative and a unique example of a highly successful partnership between industry, government, research and community: the four-way joint support of the project existing between BHP Billiton, The South Australian Department for Environment and Natural Resources, The University of Adelaide, and of course the local community. The program is centred on a 123 square kilometre fenced reserve that protects a range of native plants and animals in South Australia's arid zone. This patch of land straddles a mining lease, and represents proof that, in some cases, conservation can happily co-exist side-by-side with mining. Steve Green, the Sustainability Manager for BHP Billiton in Adelaide says that Arid Recovery's primary goal was to "remove feral animals from an exclosure area, and to reintroduce species that we knew existed in the region." Feral cats, rabbits and foxes have now been successfully eradicated from half of the Reserve and this has provided a zone of complete protection into which four species of locally extinct mammals have been successfully reintroduced, including the Western Barred Bandicoot, the Greater Bilby, the Greater Stick Nest Rat and the Burrowing Bettong. As Helen says, these four "strange and quirky" species are now thriving within the Reserve. Additional species can look forward to being reintroduced in the very near future. This is the largest reserve of its kind in arid Australia and a world leader in ecosystem restoration through the use of exclusion fencing. Marty Kittel has worked for BHP Billiton as an underground miner for 25 years, but he's also proud to say he looks after the fencing of the Arid Recovery Reserve. "Roughly once a week I check the fence and give it a good once over." The CEO of Arid Recovery, Kylie Piper says, "You can count on one hand the number of predators that have been inside the fence since it was built. That's an amazing feat". But the long term goal is more effective methods of large scale feral species control beyond the fence. This involves research that underpins the main aim of the project: Arid Recovery has undertaken ground-breaking research trialling aerial baiting for feral cats and radio-tracking cats and foxes with GPS collars to gain a greater understanding of their behaviour. The program's success is thanks to unwavering support, not only from Australian Mining, but also from many volunteers, including locals and university students. In fact, Arid Recovery now has an active student scholarship program offering placements to students. As Kylie Piper says, "it's a collaboration of people. It's mining, government, research, and education." Arid Recovery represents a new breed of thinking that demonstrates how mining and conservation organisations can work together to benefit the environment. Australian Mining's vision is that the sustainable land management techniques developed by the team at Arid Recovery will be adopted in arid areas not only here, but throughout the world.
Views: 1510 AusMiningStory
TWIA: RossFardon
 
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Ross Fardon is a Queenslander educated at University of Queensland and with a doctorate from Harvard, but he learnt more from the indigenous people of the world. He trained for the Methodist ministry but gave up religion for better beliefs. He had his best company experience in Western Mining Corporation, was in charge of world mineral exploration for BHP and for MIM Holdings, Director General of Mines and Energy in South Australia, CEO or Chairman of two new-tech companies and Chairman of a Commonwealth Cooperative Research Centre, and a consultant to business and governments. He worked in fourteen countries and had to set world exploration strategies. He has written and lectured widely. (When he talks to university college students, none of them has read the Bible or any of the classics of literature or history.) He is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and other organizations, is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Queensland, was awarded a Centenary Medal for Services to Australia and a Legend of Australian Mining. His interests are the arts, management, astronomy, evolution and anthropology, biology, history, sport and gardening. He lives in Melbourne, and is grateful to be part of the most fortunate generation ever. www.rossfardonbooksandessays.com
Views: 40 TWIAtv
05. Locata- a Technology Component of Mine Automation - Chris Rizos
 
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Off Earth Mining Forum http://www.acser.unsw.edu.au/oemf/ Professor Chris Rizos is the Head of the School of Surveying & Geospatial Engineering at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia. Chris has been researching the technology and applications of GPS since 1985, and established over a decade ago Australia's premier academic satellite navigation and wireless location technology research group. Chris is President of the International Association of Geodesy (IAG), Co-chair of the Multi-GNSS Asia Steering Committee, and a member of the Executive and Governing Board of the International GNSS Service (IGS). Chris has been conducting research into pseudolite technology for over 13 years, and in that time has assisted with the testing of Locata in a variety of applications.
Views: 433 ACSER UNSW
AK History Nuggets - Early Gold Mining
 
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Clip shows gold miners panning, using rocker boxes and sluice boxes. Narration describes small-scale gold mining. The Alaska History Nugget series was created in 2004-2005 as a cooperative project between the University of Alaska Statewide, Alaska Public Broadcasting, and the Alaska Film Archives at the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library. The series was produced for broadcast on Alaska One; each 60 second program covers a different Alaskan subject. (B&W/Sound/varied formats) This sequence is an excerpt from AAF-661 held by the Alaska Film Archives, a unit of the Alaska & Polar Regions Department in the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks. For more information please contact the Alaska Film Archives.
Views: 2494 Alaska Film Archives
A short history of Prospect - film trailer
 
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From Farms to Suburbia: a short history of Prospect, South Australia To purchase the 20 minute film on DVD visit: Prospect Library or Prospect Civic Centre or contact Prospect Local History Group. Since 1836, the City of Prospect has been transformed from Kaurna land into a thriving modern suburb with a priceless heritage of nineteenth century housing and shops. How did it all begin? How did the City grow and develop? Who were some of the key figures? This entertaining introduction to the history of the City of Prospect, South Australia covers these topics and more: Sport, wartime, education, health services, housing, business and industry, transport, hotels, government services and religion. Respect to the Kaurna people, and their ongoing custodianship and spiritual relationship with their country.
Mining At Johannesburg For Gold And Uranium (1950)
 
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Johannesburg, South Africa. Documentation states South Africa produces half the world's output of gold and now a good portion of uranium, where more than 375,000 men are employed. The documentation elaborates on the production of gold and uranium. GV two rooftops, Johannesburg. LS of miners entering mine. CU MS of miners at work drilling etc. LS CU ore on conveyor belt CU of hot molten gold being poured into mould machinery is then clamped down on top of it the gold bar now finished is taken over to be weighed. LS exterior mine CU earth on moving conveyor belt CU of mixture of earth and water running from pipe into tank. High angle of int plant. Various CUs of machinery which drains the ore. LS CU of ore when it has finally reached the stage where all moisture has been removed. LS of man placing ore in kiln. LS int men pulling trolley High angle of goods yard CU LS crane lifting barrels and lowering them into hold of ship. LS of oil tanker. FG FILM ID:2570.19 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 532 British Pathé
Aboriginal archaeological discovery in Kakadu: rewrites the history of Australia.
 
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Aboriginal archaeological discovery in Kakadu: rewrites the history of Australia. Jabiru, Northern Territory: Aborigines have lived in Australia for a minimum of 65,000 years, a team of archaeologists has established 18,000 years longer than previously proven and at least 5000 years longer than most researchers had speculated Optimistic The discovery in the world, following years of archaeological excavations in a former camp under a sandstone shelter within the Jabiru mining contract in Kakadu, Northern Territory, drastically alters the known history of Africa's expedition by modern humans , To the leader of the international team of archaeologists, associate professor Chris Clarkson of the University of Queensland. The findings, which are already causing intense interest in archaeological circles around the world, have been reviewed by internationally recognized scientists. Among the treasures of the discoveries are the oldest stone axles in the world with polished and sharp edges, which shows that the first Australians were among the most sophisticated tool makers of their time: no other culture had such axes during others 20,000 years. The axes were perfectly preserved, placed against the back wall of the shelter as we dug deeper and deeper, Professor Clarkson to Fairfax Media. Traditional owners May Nango and Mark Djanjomerr with a stone ax found on site. Free Stock Image: Glenn Campbell. Traditional owners May Nango and Mark Djanjomerr with a stone ax found on site. Free Stock Image: Glenn Campbell. There was one on the surface, another below which we date back to 10,000 years, and then there were some further down that were able to date from 35,000 to 40,000 years, and finally one to 65,000 years, surrounded by a lot of scales stone.
Views: 585 Science and more
Dredge and mining operations in Alaska
 
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Mining activities in Alaska in the 1930s. Scenes depict dredges, a walking dragline, tailings piles, and miscellaneous mining-related operations, including workers removing pins from dredge buckets. (B&W/Silent/16mm film). This sequence contains excerpts from AAF-11853 from the Donald MacDonald Papers collection held by the Alaska Film Archives, a unit of the Alaska and Polar Regions Collections & Archives Department in the Elmer E. Rasmuson Library, University of Alaska Fairbanks. For more information please contact the Alaska Film Archives. This film is a gift donated in the memory of Reino and Marjorie (MacDonald) Huttula by the Huttula Family.
Views: 8834 Alaska Film Archives
Carmichael Coal Mine
 
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A description of the Carmichael Coal Mine proposed by Indian resources-group Adani in central Queensland, Australia, extracted from a lecture delivered by Dr Chris McGrath at the University of Queensland (UQ) on 7 April 2016. The full lecture is available at https://youtu.be/FKutt1SR39A
Views: 7037 Chris McGrath
Michael Tellinger: Stone Circles and Ancient Gold Mines in South Africa FULL LECTURE
 
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Subscribe to our channel at http://www.youtube.com/megalithomaniaUK. http://www.megalithomania.co.uk/2010dvds.html - Filmed at the Megalithomania Conference in Glastonbury on 9th May 2010. Description: Over 1 million circular stone structures lie scattered throughout southern Africa. Until recently these have been called cattle kraal, of little historic value. Extensive research by Michael Tellinger and others has revealed that these are the remains of a vanished ancient civilization dating back tens of thousands of years. It covered an area larger than modern day Johannesburg and London together. Tools, artifacts, and petroglyphs indicate that the Egyptians and Sumerians got much of their knowledge and imagery from this vanished civilization. All of this is crowned by a stone calendar now called Adam's Calendar that is forcing the academics to question human origins. Scientific evidence shows that this was also a gold mining culture and many prehistoric gold mines are still present throughout the area. Biog: Michael Tellinger has become one of South Africa's bestselling export authors. His regular articles on human origins and his book Slave Species of God have been praised by readers in over 20 countries. He graduated in 1983 from the University Of Witwatersrand Medical School, Johannesburg, with a B.Pharmaceutics degree, a passion for the cosmos, genetics and human history. His research and astute understanding of his subject matter has made him a regular guest on many radio shows in the USA and UK. Filmed by Nautilus AV Productions. Websites: http://www.michaeltellinger.com http://www.megalithomania.co.uk
Views: 14923 MegalithomaniaUK
UNSW Mining Engineering
 
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UNSW Mining Engineering
Views: 7764 AboutUNSW
Maules Creek Mine Blockade: Stop the Mine, Save Leard Forest.
 
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Right now in North West NSW, history is being made. Hundreds of concerned Australians - including farmers, Traditional Owners, doctors, local community members and religious leaders - have been regularly making their way from all corners of the country to blockade the construction of Whitehaven's massive new coal mine. Together they have managed to slow Whitehaven's attempts to destroy some of Australia's rarest woodlands and create one of the largest new coal mines in the country. Find out more at www.maulesblockade.com.au
Burra Burra Copper Mine
 
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GPC history professor Dr. Will Simson and GPC student Victoria Nicholson are helping Tennessee's Ducktown Basin Museum explore and archive historic copper mining records. Nicholson is a Library Information Science Technology student at GPC
Views: 1466 Perimeter College
Cue, Western Australia (HD)
 
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Cue, Western Australia (HD) - Cue, WA Tourism and vacation Travel Videos HD, World Travel Guide http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=World1Tube The small town of Cue in Western Australia's Murchison Region is to me a particularly interesting outback town. Like so many old WA mining towns, Cue has thrived and floundered over the years with times of boom and bust. The town was established in 1893 following the discovery of gold in the area the year before, which sparked a gold rush to the remote Murchison Region desert. In its heyday at the beginning of the twentieth century Cue was home to over 10000 people, a thriving and prosperous town known as "The Queen of the Murchison". These days things couldn't be more different. With a population of less than 300, Cue is very close to being a ghost town. When we visited Cue earlier this year the wide streets were still and silent beneath a big blue desert sky. The whole time we were there we didn't see a single soul walking around town and we noticed a good number of the buildings were abandoned or up for lease. The empty streets of Cue would have felt really quite spooky if it weren't for the constant parade of roadtrains roaring through on their way between Perth and the Pilbara carrying fuel and massive pieces of mining equipment. This for me is what made Cue such a memorable place -- the decay and ghostliness of the semi-abandoned town, and the way it felt as if time had stood still there ever since the 1930′s. However I have a feeling that Cue might be quite a different place in a few years time as the shire seems to be going to some effort to restore the town's buildings to their former glory and attract more visitors to the town and surrounding region. And with rumours of a new big mine opening in the area, the population could soon be set to rise again. Gracious Heritage Architecture in Cue =========================== Walking around the streets of Cue feel like stepping back in time. Not much appears to have changed on the main street over the years. Almost all of the buildings are the original ones that were built in the 1890′s and 1900′s -- some still serving their original purpose, some beautifully restored and others abandoned and left to ruin. While a lot of the old heritage Goldrush-era buildings look crumbling and decrepit, I can still understand why Cue's town slogan is "Queen of the Murchison". Some of the old sandstone buildings sure are grand for a dusty outpost in the middle of nowhere! Visiting and Exploring Around Cue, Western Australia =============================== If you happen to be heading up Great Northern Highway for any reason -- on your way to Karijini and the Pilbara perhaps -- then I highly recommend making a stop in Cue. It is an interesting and memorable place to spend some time in and is well-situated for a stopover on a long outback drive, being 650km from Perth and approximately half way to Newman and Karijini. If you've got a bit of time to spare while you're in the area, it's well worth taking a half-day detour westwards out to Walga Rock and the ghost town Big Bell. Things to See and Do in and Around Cue, Western Australia ================================ Go for a drive or walk around town and have a look at the interesting and beautiful old heritage buildings. Government Buildings -- police station, court house and post office Gentleman's Club (now the shire office) Masonic Lodge building Bank of New South Wales building Rotunda (site of the town's first well) Pensioner huts and old gaol (part of the caravan park) Check out the historical photograph collection in the shire office building (formerly the town Gentleman's Club) to gain some more context to the history of Cue. Drive up to the top of the Radio Tower Hill (Cue Lookout) for views over the town, the nearby mines, and horizon-to-horizon dry red earth. A good idea is to pick up the brochure and follow the Cue Heritage Trail, which will take around to the main attractions in the surrounding area and provide interesting background info. Try fossicking for gold -- you never know, you could get lucky! In late winter and spring the beautiful desert wildflowers bloom to life, carpeting the red dusty ground in fields of colour. This is the best time of year to visit Cue and explore the surrounding country. Camp out for the night or just enjoy the beautiful scenery and wildlife at Lake Nallan, a nature reserve about 24km north of Cue Or camp/picnic at Milly Soak, 16km north of Cue. Also has a small pioneer cemetery and well Head out west along Austin Downs Road to Walga Rock to see the cave paintings, climb the rock and perhaps camp there for the night. While in the area, check out what remains of Big Bell, a ghost town.
Views: 4298 World Travel Guides
Best Australian Universities to Study Geophysics
 
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Australian universities to stud geology , geophysics , work in Oil and Gas sector, become geophysicist 0. Australia is currently the 2nd largest LNG exporter and it is expected to become the largest by 2020. Australia also has vast deposits of Shale oil resources. The oil and gas industry always require geologists and Geophysicist to carry out survey and analyze data for technical and economical viability. 1. University of Sydney, Courses UG , PG, PG Research (HDR) , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 90 2. University of Adelaide, Courses UG , PG, PG Research (HDR ) , English Requirements IELTS 6.0, TOEFL 60 3. University of Western Australia, ,Courses UG , PG , Phd , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 82 4. Curtin University, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 79 5. University of Tasmania, Courses PG, English Requirements IELTS 6.0, TOEFL 72 6. Macquarie University, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 83 7. University if Queensland, Courses UG , PG , English Requirements IELTS 6.5, TOEFL 87 bachelor's degree masters degree associates degree masters mba degree online degrees online universities online masters programs business degree masters in education mba degree graduate degree bachelors degree master of education computer science degree college degrees doctorate degree ba degree masters programs graduate school undergraduate degree bs degree phd degree online psychology degree bachelor's degree online online counseling degree graduate program online college degrees master of science online mba degrees online masters in education associates degree online online bachelor degree programs master online online bachelors degree mba degree online online education degrees online history degree online degree programs online it degree accelerated bachelors degree doctorate degree online bachelor degree online masters degree in nursing online social work degree psychology degree online masters degree in social work masters in education online online associates degree accredited online universities online graduate programs online masters degree programs online doctoral programs master's degree or master's degree msc degree teaching degree online masters degree in counseling masters degree in education masters degree in business online teaching degree master of arts online bachelor degree masters of education online masters degree online best online degrees online masters degree masters programs online masters degree in psychology masters in business master degree programs online undergraduate degrees master of business online math degree master's degree in bachelor degree programs degree program masters degree in computer science online nutrition degree teaching degree degree online as degree online phd programs online engineering degree best online masters programs counseling degrees nutrition degree online doctoral programs what is an ma degree what is a masters degree engineering degree online best masters degree bachelor of arts degree education degree online biology degree life experience degree ma program online programs masters education online law degree law degree online best masters degrees masters degree in spanish south university online doctor degree masters university phd programs graduate school programs professional degree bachelor of science degree master of science degree masters degree in law one year masters programs postgraduate degree graduate school search graduate college 1 year masters programs list of masters degree the master's university masters degree online education baccalaureate degree masters degree uk master business online masters masters degree in usa post graduate degree online masters degree education masters school masters degree computer science accredited online bachelor degree online masters programs in education masters or master's online education degree programs masters in education online programs online phd ms master graduate university bachelors degree online online masters education programs
Growing SA | 9 News Adelaide
 
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Warren Tredrea discovers how 2014 is shaping up to be one of the greatest years in South Australia's sporting history.
Views: 128 9NewsAdel
How Do Rock Layers Show a Young Earth?
 
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Taken from the film, "Is Genesis History?" Watch the full film here: https://isgenesishistory.com/ Dr. Snelling completed a BS in applied geology at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, graduating with first-class honors in 1975. His PhD in geology was awarded in 1982 by The University of Sydney for his research thesis titled “A Geochemical Study of the Koongarra Uranium Deposit, Northern Territory, Australia.” Dr. Snelling worked for six years in the exploration and mining industries in Tasmania, New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, and the Northern Territory, variously as a field, mine, and research geologist. For over ten years, Dr. Snelling was a research consultant to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for an international collaborative research project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy which involved university and government research scientists from the USA, UK, Australia, Japan, Korea, Sweden, Austria and Belgium. He is currently Director of Research for Answers in Genesis. To see the full film or find additional resources about the history recorded in Genesis, visit https://isgenesishistory.com/
Views: 1332 Is Genesis History?
Jason Kuchel - CEO of SA Chamber of Mines & Energy (SACOME)
 
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Jason Kuchel is the Chief Executive of the South Australian Chamber of Mines & Energy (SACOME), a role he has held since April 2007. During this time he has more than doubled membership, raised their media profile more than 30 fold, significantly increased lobbying capability whilst simultaneously introducing a range of pro-active industry programs. Jason has considerable lobbying history having previously grown the capability of the Electronics Industry Association from its infancy to a substantive organization where revenues were increased by 300% over a 5 year period. He was also the President of the Institute of Public Works Engineering Australia (IPWEA) SA division at 26 years of age. Jason holds graduate and post graduate degrees in engineering with his most substantial role being that of Director of Infrastructure & Technical Services for the City of Prospect. The role also included responsibility as City Engineer from the age of 24, making him the youngest ever City Engineer in South Australia. Jason holds board level responsibilities on the University of South Australia's, Australian Centre for Asian Business (ACAB), the State Governments Resources and Energy Sector's Infrastructure Council (RESIC) and Mining Industry Participation Office (MIPO). Previous State Government and other board level roles range from the Adelaide Mount Lofty Ranges Natural Resources Management Board (AMLR NRM), the Torrens Catchment Water Management Board (TCWMB), the University of South Australia's Urban Water Resources Centre (UWRC), the Hahndorf St Michaels Lutheran School Board and various professional associations. Jason is also Chair of the International Associations Forum for the Prospectors and Developers Association of Canada. Jason speaks regularly on industry matters and the opportunities in the South Australian Resources Sector to small and large groups of people both here in Australia and as far as China, Canada, Europe and South America. In the latter continent, his fluency in Spanish has proven a real asset.
Views: 74 rotaryclubadelaide
Iron Knob Mine Tours - Top Tourist Parks - Discover Downunder
 
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About 70kms from Whyalla, South Australia you will come across a town called Iron Knob. It's a small town with a big history. Brooke Hanson TV presenter of Discover Downunder talks to Bryan Lock who runs Iron Knob Mine Tours. The mine started back in 1899 and is special because the hole was dug by hand. Local volunteers run the local mine tours open from Monday to Friday 9.30am until 3.30pm and they also proudly take you around the town.
Views: 384 TopParks TV
Australian Miners Find Over $10 Million of Gold In 'Truly Unique' Discovery | Gift Of Life
 
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Miners in Western Australia dug up over $10 million worth of gold in just four days, in what is considered a "truly unique" discovery. The exploration was made last week at the Beta Hunt mine, nearly 400 miles away from the West Australian capital of Perth. “I’ve been an airleg miner for 16 years. Never in my life have I ever seen anything like this. There were chunks of gold in the face, on the ground, truly unique I reckon. I nearly fell over looking at it… we were picking it up for hours,” said Henry Dole, the miner who found the precious metal, according to Australia's ABC News. Geologist Zaf Thanos told the news outlet that the discovery was unique because gold that is discovered by mines around the world is usually only visible under a microscope.  "As a geologist, like I said, you get excited by a pinhead speck. But to see something on this scale is just phenomenal," Thanos said.   The gold was coated on rocks made up of quartz. The largest weighed 210 pounds and held more than 2,400 ounces of gold, with a value of a little over $3 million. A second, weighing 139 pounds, contained 1,600 ounces of gold and is valued at nearly $2 million. The stones were found 546 yards beneath the ground in a space that was just over three yards wide and three yards high. "People do still record finding nuggets in the goldfields, but typically they are less than several ounces. Very, very seldom do we see results on that level. This is an exceedingly rare find and very exciting," said Professor Sam Spearing, the director of the Western Australia School of Mines at Curtin University, according to the BBC. Spearing said that miners in Australia usually get as little as two grams of gold for every ton of rock that is mined. Last week's treasure yielded 2,200 grams of gold per ton. The largest specimen of gold to ever be found weighed 628 pounds and was discovered in Australia's New South Wales in 1872. Along with the discovery of a museum-grade specimen two years ago,1,500 ounces of gold was extracted from the same area where last week's discovery was made at the Beta Hunt mine.   Since the excavation of the gold specimen, security at the Canadian-owned mine has grown substantially, and workers are being watched by security cameras. Workers said that bags of gold were buried long ago by those who came before them in hopes of rising prices, but last week’s discovery has been transported by armed guards who have been storing the gold in a vault. The owner of the mine, which was mainly used to extract nickel, said that the stones would be auctioned off as collector items. “We’re really looking forward to auctioning the keystones off over the coming weeks. There’s a pretty select group of collectors who this would appeal to. When you look at the nuggets, which are a solid piece of gold, the biggest are around 2,000 ounces, so this is right up there in terms of the largest specimens we’ve ever seen,” said RNC Minerals President Mark Selby.
TWIA: Ross Fardon
 
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Ross Fardon is a Queenslander educated at University of Queensland and with a doctorate from Harvard, but he learnt more from the indigenous people of the world. He trained for the Methodist ministry but gave up religion for better beliefs. He had his best company experience in Western Mining Corporation, was in charge of world mineral exploration for BHP and for MIM Holdings, Director General of Mines and Energy in South Australia, CEO or Chairman of two new-tech companies and Chairman of a Commonwealth Cooperative Research Centre, and a consultant to business and governments. He worked in fourteen countries and had to set world exploration strategies. He has written and lectured widely. (When he talks to university college students, none of them has read the Bible or any of the classics of literature or history.) He is a Fellow of the Academy of Technological Sciences and Engineering and other organizations, is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Queensland, was awarded a Centenary Medal for Services to Australia and a Legend of Australian Mining. His interests are the arts, management, astronomy, evolution and anthropology, biology, history, sport and gardening. He lives in Melbourne, and is grateful to be part of the most fortunate generation ever. www.rossfardonbooksandessays.com
Views: 59 TWIAtv
Dr. Roshan Bhappu: On His Arrival in the United States in the 1940s
 
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http://bancroft.berkeley.edu/ROHO/narrators/bhappu_roshan.html for complete oral history transcript with Dr. Roshan Bhappu. Roshan Bhappu: Science and Values in the Life of a Metallurgical Engineer Conducted by Paul Burnett in 2014, Regional Oral History Office, The Bancroft Library, University of California, Berkeley, 2014. Dr. Roshan Bhappu was chosen to begin this new project in part because his life history is truly global in scope, beginning in Karachi, India, and ranging across Europe, the United States, South America, Central Asia, East Asia, and Australia. Here is a clip from the interview in which Dr. Bhappu reminisces about his arrival in the United States to study metallurgy in 1948. Dr. Bhappu was also chosen because of his outstanding reputation in the mining, metallurgical, and international development communities, and he has authored hundreds of reports and research papers for his clients. He has been the president of the Mining and Metallurgical Society of America, and has received its highest award, among many others, for his contributions to several fields of research and mining practice. For over twenty years, the Regional Oral History Office (ROHO) produced in-depth oral histories of members of the mining community, under a project called "Western Mining in the Twentieth Century," which was overseen by Eleanor “Lee” and Langan “Lang” Swent, Doug Fuerstenau and others. The 104 interviews in the project covered the history of mining in the American Southwest, Mexico, South America, and Australia from the 1940s until the 1990s. ROHO has recently changed its name to the Oral History Center of the Bancroft Library, and with that change we proudly announce a new project entitled “Global Mining and Materials Research,” which will focus on key transitions in technology, policy, and geopolitics that have brought mining to its current state worldwide. Copyright © UC Regents 2014
Granitic pegmatites Formation and mining Presented by Mark Jacobson, Retired Chevron Corporation
 
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Pegmatites, formed in the last stages of magma crystallization, have long been prominent, often beautiful parts of igneous and metamorphic rock environments – they can be found in the Teton Range, the Winds, the Gros Ventres, and indeed around the world. Beautiful mineral specimens and elements important to a wide range of industrial uses. This talk will provide a brief review of how pegmatites form – something that involved a major paradigm change circa 1988, and then will include an overview of why they are mined today. An overview of a worldwide selection of pegmatites will be examined, including some examples from Wyoming and Colorado, showing quarry pits, geologic cross sections, miners, photogenic scenery, and interesting minerals that are found in pegmatites.
Michael Tellinger - Stone Circles & Ancient Gold Mines in South Africa - Megalithomania 2010
 
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The 2017 Megalithomania Conference is on 20th-21st May in Glastonbury, UK, with a top line-up of ancient mysteries authors and researchers. Details here: http://www.megalithomania.co.uk. Subscribe here: http://youtube.com/MegalithomaniaUK. WATCH THE FULL LECTURE HERE: https://youtu.be/-8lF1XlpAlU http://www.megalithomania.co.uk/tours.html - Join Megalithomania in 2015-2016 on tours to Gobekli Tepe in Turkey, the Megalithic sites of of Peru and Bolivia, with authors Andrew Collins, Brien Foerster, Hugh Newman & more. Click above for full details. http://www.megalithomania.co.uk/2010dvds.html - Filmed at the Megalithomania Conference in Glastonbury on 9th May 2010 by Nautilus AV Productions. Description: Over 1 million circular stone structures lie scattered throughout southern Africa. Until recently these have been called cattle kraal, of little historic value. Extensive research by Michael Tellinger and others has revealed that these are the remains of a vanished ancient civilization dating back tens of thousands of years. It covered an area larger than modern day Johannesburg and London together. Tools, artifacts, and petroglyphs indicate that the Egyptians and Sumerians got much of their knowledge and imagery from this vanished civilization. All of this is crowned by a stone calendar now called Adam's Calendar that is forcing the academics to question human origins. Scientific evidence shows that this was also a gold mining culture and many prehistoric gold mines are still present throughout the area. Biog: Michael Tellinger has become one of South Africa's bestselling export authors. His regular articles on human origins and his book Slave Species of God have been praised by readers in over 20 countries. He graduated in 1983 from the University Of Witwatersrand Medical School, Johannesburg, with a B.Pharmaceutics degree, a passion for the cosmos, genetics and human history. His research and astute understanding of his subject matter has made him a regular guest on many radio shows in the USA and UK. Websites: http://www.slavespecies.com/ http://www.adamscalendar.com
Views: 39223 MegalithomaniaUK
Leo Liang
 
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Leo is a Mechanical Engineer who is working with Rio Tinto undertaking post graduate mining research at UQ. Leo shares how he is finding the mining industry.
Views: 264 MiningEducationMEA
Re-imagining Australia: human rights for everyone - Prof Gillian Triggs | Lecture Curtin University
 
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Interested in studying? http://humanrights.curtin.edu.au/ or join the conversation https://www.facebook.com/CurtinCentreForHumanRightsEducation Professor Triggs examines the current state of play of human rights in Australia and explores the approaches to human rights education taken by the Australian Human Rights Commission, including its work linked to the national school curriculum, in its public campaigns and in its work with the business sector. Chapters: 00:00 Introduction - Professor Deborah Terry 06:25 Speech - Professor Gillian Triggs 44.47 Short film - Magna Carta - the story of our freedom 49:02 Speech - Professor Gillian Triggs 51:02 TV spot - Racism. It Stops With Me Feat. Adam Goodes The Inaugural Annual Curtin University Human Rights Lecture is an important new initiative of the Centre for Human Rights Education (CHRE). Professor Gillian Triggs, President of the Australian Human Rights Commission, presented this public lecture Thursday 12 May, 2016.
Views: 1204 Curtin University
Innovation, Safety and the Future of Mining | Curtin University Lecture
 
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The future of mining, where is it going? Join our four prominent alumni as they lead this conversation and share their expertise on innovation, safety, policy and leadership within the industry. Speakers: - Mr Neil Warburton (Master of Ceremonies), Executive Chairman at White Rivers Exploration - Mr Greg Lilleyman, Director of Operations at Fortescue Metals Group - Dr Vanessa Guthrie, Chairman of the Minerals Council of Australia - Mr Steve Durkin, Managing Director at Safescape Chapter Markers: This Alumni Innovator Series: Innovation, Safety and the Future of Mining was held on Wednesday 31 May 2017 at our Bentley Campus. This video has been closed captioned.
Views: 1207 Curtin University
The South Australian Aboriginal Regional Authority Initiative
 
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This documentary, funded by the State Government and produced by the Ngarrindjeri Regional Authority Media Team in conjunction with Change Media, captures the views and experiences of the four trial groups that participated in the Aboriginal Regional Authority workshop program.
How Radiometric Dating Works: Relative not Absolute Ages
 
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If you like this technical lecture from the 2017 IGH Conference, you can get it and over 70 more at: https://isgenesishistory.com/conference/ Listen to Dr. Andrew Snelling explain how radioisotope dating works, document the anomalies he has discovered with it, and examine how it can be used for relative dating purposes. Dr. Snelling completed a BS in applied geology at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, graduating with first-class honors in 1975. His PhD in geology was awarded in 1982 by The University of Sydney for his research thesis titled “A Geochemical Study of the Koongarra Uranium Deposit, Northern Territory, Australia.” Dr. Snelling worked for six years in the exploration and mining industries in Tasmania, New South Wales, Victoria, Western Australia, and the Northern Territory, variously as a field, mine, and research geologist. For over ten years, Dr. Snelling was a research consultant to the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization for an international collaborative research project funded by the U.S. Department of Energy which involved university and government research scientists from the USA, UK, Australia, Japan, Korea, Sweden, Austria and Belgium. He is currently Director of Research for Answers in Genesis. If you’ve not seen the documentary yet, here are ways to watch Is Genesis History featuring Andrew Snelling and 12 other scientists and scholars: https://isgenesishistory.com/
Views: 5139 Is Genesis History?
The contribution of mining companies to PNG development: Margaret Callan
 
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In this session, Margaret Callan, Development Policy Centre, Crawford School, ANU, discusses the contribution of mining companies to PNG development. This session is part of the economic policy challenges panel. This lecture is part of the 2013 Pacific and PNG Update. The updates are designed to bring together leading thinkers and policy makers from the Pacific and Papua New Guinea to discuss important topics such as regional trade and integration, employment and labour mobility, and service delivery, resource management and gender-based violence. The 2013 Pacific Update consisted of two days of panel discussions: day one on the Pacific; and day two on Papua New Guinea. The 2013 Pacific and PNG Update is presented by the Development Policy Centre at Crawford School of Public Policy at The Australian National University, and supported by the Asian Development Bank's Pacific Economic Management Technical Assistance and the Asia and Pacific Policy Studies, the flagship journal of the Crawford School of Public Policy, ANU. It was recorded on 28 July 2013.
Views: 177 ANU TV
Fiji residents resist Australian mining push
 
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Australian mining company Newcrest is involved in a dispute with landholders in south-east Fiji over a planned copper ore mine.
State Reaps Royalties
 
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South Australia will receive about $45 million a year in royalties from the expanded Olympic Dam mine in an historic deal, signed in Melbourne by BHP and the Premier. See tennews.com for more.
Views: 138 Channel Ten
Frontiers of Mining, Governance and Community in Western Australia
 
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Clare Mouat, Human Geography and Planning, University of Western Australia
10 Surprisingly High Paying Jobs
 
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We did the math on the grunt-to-grat ratio for you, with 10 jobs you wouldn't expect to be well-paying, and the details on what it takes to land the position, in this episode of The Infographics Show, 10 Surprisingly High Paying Jobs. ⭐SUBSCRIBE: http://bit.ly/2glTFyc ⭐ MILITARY PLAYLIST —► http://bit.ly/MilitaryComparisons WEBSITE (You can suggest a topic): http://theinfographicsshow.com SUPPORT US: Patreon.......► https://www.patreon.com/theinfographicsshow CHAT: DISCORD.....►https://discord.gg/sh5JwUw SOCIAL: Facebook...► https://facebook.com/TheInfographicsShow Instagram..►https://www.instagram.com/theinfographicsshow Twitter........► https://twitter.com/TheInfoShow Subreddit...► http://reddit.com/r/TheInfographicsShow -------------------------------------------------------------------------- Sources for this episode:
Views: 4449074 The Infographics Show
Naomi Oreskes - For Thought: Hope for the Planet
 
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Naomi Oreskes is professor of the history of science and affiliated professor of Earth and planetary sciences at Harvard University, and an internationally renowned geologist, science historian, and author, and from 1981 - 1984 worked as an exploration geologist in Australia 1981-84, for Western Mining. She received a B.Sc. (First Class Honors) in Mining Geology from the Royal School of Mines, Imperial College, London (1981) and an interdisciplinary Ph.D. in Geological Research and History of Science from Stanford University (1990). She joined the faculty at Harvard in 2013 after 15 years at the University of California, San Diego. http://sydneyoperahouse.com/ideas Subscribe and find more videos from Ideas at the House: http://www.youtube.com/ideasatthehouse Get a new talk every week on our podcast: Audio - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/sydney-opera-house-ideas-at/id640445035 Video - https://itunes.apple.com/au/podcast/sydney-opera-house-ideas-at/id640444896 Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/IdeasAtTheHouse Twitter - https://twitter.com/ideasatthehouse
Views: 1070 SOH Talks & Ideas
Queensland Mining Expo 2008 Documentary
 
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Uploaded for http://www.miningaustralia.com.au/
Views: 2942 RWebDesk
Caves and fossils- palaeontology in Australia
 
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The Integrated Palaeoenvironmental Research Group (IPRG) within the School of Earth Sciences, The University of Queensland, Australia, applies geochemistry and geochronology to Australia's rich terrestrial and marine fossil records to investigate past climate change and its impact on our fauna and flora. This video presents some of our ongoing research into the prehistoric Ice Age giants of Australia- the famous extinct megafauna. Our research includes both fieldwork in caves such as these, as well as the development of reliable and comprehensive datasets of megafaunal occurrences through time. For more information, please visit the research website of Dr Gilbert Price at http://www.diprotodon.com
Views: 3527 Gilbert Price
Inquiring Minds: Neoliberalism and the Denial of Global Warming
 
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Naomi Oreskes is Professor of History and Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego, Adjunct Professor of Geosciences at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography, and an internationally renowned historian of science and author. She is a 2012 UWA Institute of Advanced Studies Professor-at-Large collaborating with UWA researchers in the area of anthropogenic climate change. She started her career as a geologist working for Western Mining Corporation in South Australia and completed her PhD in geological research and history of science at Stanford University in 1990. Professor Oreskes has a long-standing interest in understanding the establishment of scientific consensus and the role and character of scientific dissent. She is the author of the hugely popular Merchants of Doubt, How a Handful of Scientists Obscured the Truth on Issues from Tobacco to Global Warming (2010), co-authored with Erik M. Conway.
Views: 409 Technophrenia