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The Pennsylvania Miners Story 2002
 
01:28:35
The Quecreek Mine rescue took place in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, when nine miners were trapped 240 feet below the ground for over 77 hours, from July 24 to 28, 2002.
Views: 34625 Donna R
Situation Critical - S01E12 - Coal Mine Disaster
 
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At the Quecreek Mine in Somerset County, Pennsylvania, coal miners accidentally dug into the poorly documented Saxman Mine, causing 500 million tonnes of underground water to flood the Quecreek mine. All nine miners trapped by the water were eventually rescued.
Views: 462819 GFS Valhalla
Harlan County, USA
 
01:44:35
Harlan County, USA is a 1976 Oscar-winning documentary film covering the "Brookside Strike", an effort of 180 coal miners and their wives against the Duke Power Company-owned Eastover Coal Company's Brookside Mine and Prep Plant in Harlan County, southeast Kentucky in 1973.[2] Directed and produced by Barbara Kopple, who has long been an advocate of workers' rights, Harlan County, U.S.A. is less ambivalent in its attitude toward unions than her later American Dream, the account of the Hormel Foods strike in Austin, Minnesota in 1985-86. Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - Harlan County, USA - documentaries
Views: 19037 Karl Hungus
On Coal River - Full Movie | Snagfilms
 
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Coal River Valley, West Virginia is a community surrounded by lush mountains and a looming toxic threat. Filmed over a period of five years, ON COAL RIVER follows a former miner and his neighbors in a David-and-Goliath struggle for the future of their valley, their children, and life as they know it. Ed Wiley once worked at the same coal plant that threatens his granddaughter's elementary school. When his local government refuses to act, Ed embarks on a quest to have the school relocated to safer ground. With a sharp sense of right and wrong, Ed confronts his local school board, the state government, and a notorious coal company for putting his granddaughter and his community at risk. Download Our Apple or Android Apps: http://bit.ly/Snag_Apps Watch Free Movies Online: http://bit.ly/snag_films Like Us On Facebook: http://bit.ly/snag_fb Follow Us On Twitter: http://bit.ly/Snag_Tweets
Views: 4608 SnagFilms
The 33 - Official Trailer [HD]
 
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The 33 - in theaters November 13th. http://the33movie.com https://www.facebook.com/the33movie --- From Alcon Entertainment and Phoenix Pictures comes the unforgettable true story of “The 33.” In 2010, the eyes of the world turned to Chile, where 33 miners had been buried alive by the catastrophic explosion and collapse of a 100-year-old gold and copper mine. Over the next 69 days, an international team worked night and day in a desperate attempt to rescue the trapped men as their families and friends, as well as millions of people globally, waited and watched anxiously for any sign of hope. But 200 stories beneath the surface, in the suffocating heat and with tensions rising, provisions—and time—were quickly running out. A story of resilience, personal transformation and triumph of the human spirit, the film takes us to the Earth’s darkest depths, revealing the psyches of the men trapped in the mine, and depicting the courage of both the miners and their families who refused to give up. Based on the gripping true story of survival—and filmed with the cooperation of the miners, their families and their rescuers—“The 33” reveals the never-before-seen actual events that unfolded, above and below ground, which became nothing less than a worldwide phenomenon. The international cast is led by Antonio Banderas, Rodrigo Santoro, Academy Award winner Juliette Binoche (“The English Patient”), James Brolin, and Lou Diamond Phillips, with Bob Gunton and Gabriel Byrne. The main cast also includes Mario Casas, Jacob Vargas, Juan Pablo Raba, Oscar Nuñez, Tenoch Huerta, Marco Treviño, Adriana Barraza, Kate Del Castillo, Cote de Pablo, Elizabeth De Razzo, Naomi Scott, Gustavo Angarita, and Alejandro Goic. Patricia Riggen directed “The 33” from a screenplay by Mikko Alanne, Oscar nominee Craig Borten (“Dallas Buyers Club”) and Michael Thomas, based on the screen story by Jose Rivera and the book Deep Down Dark by Hector Tobar. The film was produced by Oscar nominee Mike Medavoy (“Black Swan”), Robert Katz and Edward McGurn. Carlos Eugenio Lavin, Leopoldo Enriquez, Alan Zhang and José Luis Escolar served as executive producers. The behind-the-scene creative team included cinematographer Checco Varese, production designer Marco Niro, editor Michael Tronick and Oscar-nominated costume designer Paco Delgado (“Les Misérables”). The Academy Award-winning team of Alex Henning and Ben Grossman (“Hugo”) supervised the visual effects. The score was composed by Oscar winner James Horner (“Titanic”). “The 33” was filmed on location in Chile’s harshly remote yet stunningly beautiful Atacama desert just kilometers away from where the event took place, and deep within two mines located in central Colombia. A presentation of Alcon Entertainment and Phoenix Pictures, “The 33” is slated to open on November 13, 2015 and will be distributed by Warner Bros. Pictures, a Warner Bros. Entertainment Company.
Views: 6288509 Warner Bros. Pictures
The Town That Was - Full Movie | Snagfilms
 
01:10:51
In 1962, a trash fire ignites a seam of anthracite coal beneath the once-thriving mining town of Centralia, Pennsylvania. The fire continued to rage unchecked into the mid-1980s: giant plumes of smoke and deadly carbon monoxide gases billowed from fissures in the ground, the local highway cracked and collapsed, trees were bleached white and petrified. It wasn't until a young boy nearly died after falling into a smoldering mine that the government was pressed into action. After estimating the cost of extinguishing the fire at over a half a billion dollars, the government opted to raze the town and relocate its residents. Today, eleven die-hards remain. Filmed over a period of five years with interviews ranging from former citizens to Congressmen, THE TOWN THAT WAS is an intimate portrait of one Centralian's quixotic fight for a town that has literally disintegrated under his feet. His unbowed determination and steadfast refusal to acknowledge defeat reveal a region and a way of life that has been almost forgotten. Download Our Apple or Android Apps: http://bit.ly/Snag_Apps Watch Free Movies Online: http://bit.ly/snag_films Like Us On Facebook: http://bit.ly/snag_fb Follow Us On Twitter: http://bit.ly/Snag_Tweets
Views: 51961 SnagFilms
Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining.mpg
 
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Vintage 1920's film showing the workings of an underground Northeastern Pennsylvania Coal Mine. This silent film (originally a 16mm hand-cranked movie) shows the miners arriving at the mine and switching into mining clothes with their street clothes held up by lines near the ceiling. The miner receive safety equipments and electric head lamps and then are issued cases of dynamite. Before entering the mine they update the peg board and take the token that allows the mine operator to know exactly who is in the mine at any given time. Once in the shaft the miners drill a hole in the face of the coal seam and then pack it with the explosives. After the dust clears, the miner and his helper shovel the coal into a cart for movement to the main gangway. There the coal is transferred into larger carts and pulled away by mules. In addition to the mule drivers and "spraggers" the film shows the coal breaker where boys and disabled men pick the slate out of the coal. The creation of the culm pile is shown with railroad cars of mine waste being dumped into giant piles. Finally the coal is washed and sorted into various sizes: stove, egg, nut and then shipped out in railroad cars.
Views: 31993 JKENNED4
Sago Mine Disaster
 
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Thirteen men sat in the best barricade they could build, enduring...hoping. They had used their single hour of oxygen from the only Self Contained Self Rescuer issued to them by the company. Their families waited outside living through one of the most difficult times of their lives, praying to see their loved ones once again. As time wore on, we would learn the ultimate fate of those men, those husbands, those fathers, those grandfathers, brothers, uncles, nephews. One was alive, barely holding on…the others had perished in the thick poisoned air of the mine. The miners of Sago were like so many of us. They took one of the few jobs available to them, jobs that would allow them to live in the places they had long called home, jobs that would pay enough to support their families. If only the company had given them more than one SCSR—if only there had been a law—but we know how much power money holds over the hearts of men. It would be the suffering and tragic loss of life of those 12 brave souls—the pain of constant loss felt by their families—that would finally see to it that every coal miner in the United States would never face the same crisis. Millions of Americans became outraged at the events that played out on their televisions, and the ensuing public outcry would accomplish a feat that has seldom been accomplished in the history of US coal mining—the power of coal industry lobbyists was outweighed by the voice of the public in the halls of government. Laws were passed and now additional SCSRs must be purchased by coal companies, underground safe havens must be built and supply miners with three day of oxygen, food, and water. Each time my crew passed a safe haven and SCSR stash on our way to the section, I would think of those men, I would think of their final hours. I would pay my respects to them in my own way and wish that the corruption of the coalfields had not taken their lives. I hope that other miners do the same and remember the day the miners of Sago perished and the hearts of their families were forever broken. May you all rest in peace. God Bless.
Views: 139546 Nick Mullins
Coal Rush (FULL DOCUMENTARY)
 
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Filmed over 5 years in the coalfields of West Virginia, COAL RUSH follows the relentless battle for justice of a rural Appalachian community against a major coal company accused of polluting their drinking water. Husband-and-wife team of independent filmmakers LORENA LUCIANO and FILIPPO PISCOPO shine a spotlight on one of the worst (yet least publicized) industrial contamination disasters in the United States -- billions of gallons of coal waste dumped in the waterways and dwarfing the BP Gulf oil spill. Granted exclusive access by the legal team, and capturing with eloquent cinema verite'-style the local community's everyday life, the directors expose a serious case of environmental wrongdoing from all angles – including the coal company's standpoint -­ while bringing an important story of human suffering into focus. COAL RUSH offers an unprecedented look at some of the most pressing social and environmental issues in America today – concerns over toxins in US tap water, rural poverty, corporate malfeasance, and government failings – through the universally-appealing story of a highly controversial legal saga.
Views: 1782 The Orchard On Demand
Buried Alive - Chile Mine Rescue
 
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Subscribe to Naked Science - http://goo.gl/wpc2Q1 Every other Wednesday we present a new video, so join us to see the truth laid bare... On 5th August 2010, all 33 of the day shift miners at the San Jose mine in Chile were missing and feared killed when their copper and gold mine collapsed. For 17 days no one knew whether they were alive or dead. Miraculously, after all hope was lost, on the 17th day the specialist drilling rigs looking for signs of life smashed through into the tunnel where the men had been clinging on. All 33 of the men were alive and well. Buried Alive: The Chilean Mine Rescue was given unprecedented access to the drilling rigs, engineers and medics for the definitive story of how this audacious rescue was carried out. The film follows the extraordinary story of the 33 miners, trapped underground for 70 days. Above ground, the film makers had unique access to document the highs and lows of the drilling teams as they pounded their way through almost half a mile of granite. Below ground the programme follows how the miners survived for so long and hears first hand from the doctors and psychologists who were keeping them alive and sane, giving extraordinary insight into the underground hell they had to endure. The rescue of all 33 Chilean miners has been an extraordinary feat of ingenuity and daring. This factual documentary explains in detail the challenges they faced and the technology they used to overcome all odds. Buried Alive: The Chilean Mine Rescue gains unique access to the key players involved to tell the story of the tireless, tough and emotional effort that went on at the San Jose Mine, away from the glare of the news cameras
Views: 160688 Naked Science
Hard Coal pt. 1 Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining Histor
 
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Part 1 of 3. A short documentary about Anthracite coal mining history in Northeast Pennsylvania. Filmed in a coal mine. Please check out Van Wagner's music on Itunes.
Views: 42437 vanwags
Remember Wilberg
 
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"Remember Wilberg" is a documentary produced by UTA's Department of Art and Art History about a December 1984 fire at the Wilberg Mine in Emery County, Utah. The fire killed 27 coal miners. The documentary took more than two years to produce. While it honors the victims of the disaster, it will also be used as a safety training tool for coal miners. A $1.3 million federal grant that was awarded to UTA's Division of Enterprise Development funded the project.
Views: 16477 USMRA 1
The Bituminous Coal Queens of Pennsylvania
 
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"The Bituminous Coal Queens of Pennsylvania" documents the odyssey of Hollywood actress Sarah Rush back to her roots as a 16-year-old pageant winner, growing up in Southwestern, PA. "Coal Queens" is filled with colorful local characters, and is a humorous look at small town America. The town of Carmichaels (population 556) and its vanishing way of life is a far cry from Hollywood. Coal mining has shaped this area of the country, instilling a strength and pride in its citizens. The film captures the spirit of the community during the 50th Anniversary celebrations of the Coal Queen Pageant and the King Coal Festival in August of 2003. We travel with Sarah back to her hometown and subsequently to the State Theatre in Uniontown, where rehearsals for the pageant are underway. The contestants have won the right to represent each of 14 high schools from the area in the competition, which is comprised of talent, "the impromptu" question and answer session and the evening gown display. Through the lives of the girls and the events surrounding the pageant we learn more about them and the ties that bind the wider community. The film moves between trials of the pageant and the lives of the locals, especially the coal miners, who toil beneath the earth, knowing that the demise of their livelihood is just around the corner. David Hunt - Writer/Director/Producer Jody Eldred - Director/Camera Patricia Heaton - Producer Sarah Rush - Executive Producer Michael Wolff - Compers/Pianist Edgar Burcksen - Editor
Views: 9800 coalqueens
WRAP All nine trapped miners rescued
 
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POOL Night shots: 1. Mid shot, rescue workers lifting yellow metal cage, bringing first rescued miner to the surface, applause as miner arrives at surface 2. Miner on stretcher 3. Second miner brought to surface 4. Wide shot miner placed onto stretcher 5. Various shots as miners are brought to the surface 6. Wide shot scene 7. Miner carried away on stretcher 5. Helicopter overhead 6. Various shots as miners are brought to surface and taken on stretchers 7. Wide shot, zoom in as miner is brought to surface 8. Various shots as miners are brought to surface and taken on stretchers 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Schweiker, Governor of State of Pennsylvania: "I know we've been working for a long long time, 77 hours. And I just want to say a few things, but first: Nine for Nine. (applause) We committed ourselves to the standard of Nine for Nine, we're going to bring everybody up. And I tell you what - the medical assessment team, the drillers, the assemblers, the people that secured the site: Give yourselves a big hand here. (applause)" 10. Cutaway wide of site 11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mark Schweiker, Governor of State of Pennsylvania: "All the guys and the girls who've been cranking for 77 hours: I said to my kids, I'm never going to meet or never going to see a more engaged, determined, hardworking, successful group of people, teammates, American workers, Pennsylvanians. (applause)" 12. Pull out to wide shot STORYLINE: Rescue workers in the US state of Pennsylvania on Sunday pulled nine miners from a watery, 240-foot-deep (72-meter-deep) shaft where they had been trapped for three days. The rescue was a jubilant reward for an effort that had been fraught with one gut-wrenching setback after another. After three grim days of frantic drilling delayed by broken bits and busted seals, the rescuers broke through to the trapped men at 2216 local time (0315 GMT) on Saturday. The breakthrough allowed workers to drop a telephone line to the miners through a small air pipe. Then the word came from an unidentified, mud-caked rescue worker who shouted up from the pit near where they dropped the communication device: "They're all down there. They're waiting to come up. There's nine of them. We talked to them on the telephone." The first words from the miners were blunt. "What took you so long?" one of the miners asked, according to a rescuer. The Sipesville Fire Hall, where the families had been gathering, erupted in celebration. Families cried and hugged and many were in the street with hands in the air. Randy Fogle, 43, the first miner pulled from the 26-inch (66-centimeter) wide hole, was dropped onto a stretcher to the wild applause of rescuers. After that, miners were brought up in roughly 15-minute intervals. The miners needed little medical attention after the three-day ordeal. All nine men were all taken to hospitals, where they were to remain for 24 hours and where they would be reunited with their families, officials said. The miners became trapped in the flooded Quecreek Mine on Wednesday evening, when they inadvertently broke into an abandoned, water-filled mine that maps showed to be 300 feet (90 meters) away. As much as 60 (M) million gallons (227 (M) million liters) of water rushed into the shaft where they were working, and they were able to warn a second crew, which escaped. Reaching the men was sometimes painfully slow. Drilling a rescue shaft to the men, age 30 to 55, didn't begin until more than 20 hours after the accident, because workers had to wait for a drill rig to arrive from West Virginia. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/dcc87ca4f7cc04a1a07f01d671316265 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 3700 AP Archive
Hard Coal: Last of the Bootleg Miners (screener copy)
 
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Directed by Marc Brodzik and Produced by Woodshop Films. US. 81 mins. Filmed from 2004-2008, completed in 2009. The discovery of anthracite, or hard coal, in northeastern Pennsylvania more than 200 years ago resulted in hundreds of corporate mines in this eleven county area throughout the early 20th century. Although anthracite coal makes up only 2 percent of all the coal reserves in the United States, the area boasts more than 7.3 billion tons of this clean burning coal in a very concentrated geography. In the mid 1800s, there were hundreds of active mines with more than 17,000 coal miners- mostly poor immigrants- toiling in them for twelve hours daily. The corporations had little concern with the health of the workers, and it was extremely dangerous work, with frequent accidents and few safety measures. Miners were burned in gas explosions, crushed by tunnel collapses and run over by mine cars. If they survived the job, many miners suffered the slow and painful suffocation called black lung, caused by continual exposure to coal dust. Today, only 6 anthracite mines are left in Pennsylvania, down from 60 in 1995 and more than 140 a decade earlier. These remaining mines are worked by "bootleg" miners- typically independent, family-centric teams struggling to carry on the family tradition and support their families, working in mines they may have dug themselves. This film will bring you face-to-face with the proud, persevering individuals facing these challenges. Share their frustration with the current system and their fear of losing dignity, independence and the only means of survival they know.
Views: 1478 Scrapple TV
Burning Ghost Town In Centralia, Pennsylvania
 
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If you thought the horror movie Silent Hill was fiction, you should visit Centralia, Pennsylvania. This abandoned ghost town has had a fire burning underground for over 50 years! Due to constant spontaneous combustion and oxidation, this mysterious old coal mine is completely out of control! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most SHOCKING Biological Weapons Ever!" video here: https://youtu.be/W0Yli9y7YAk Watch our "Top 5 Most Mysterious and Powerful Secret Societies" video here: https://youtu.be/0Lu4Uvc5EhA Watch our "DEADLIEST Ship Disaster In History!" video here: https://youtu.be/8cNBVZMoalc Town literally burning for more than 50 years! There is a small town in Pennsylvania that has been burning since 1962. That’s over 50 years! What? How is that even possible? So the issue is that Centralia, Pennsylvania is on top of some of the biggest coal deposits in the world. In the 1800s miners blasted tunnels underground and then abandoned them about 100 years later. No one really knows what exactly caused the fire but the strongest theory is that some burning trash from a landfill accidentally lit the coal near an old entrance to the mine. Yeah this isn’t fog, it’s smoke. Since sometimes coal deposits are under a lot of pressure, it can even ignite without a flame. The oxygen from the empty tunnels created the perfect conditions for the fire to spread. The flames started going deeper and deeper into the surrounding area as more coal burned, and the tunnels continue to take oxygen down from the surface. It is now in a vicious, fiery cycle that is now about 300 feet deep. Coal burns slow and steady and can take ages to burn out. As long as there is enough heat, fuel, and oxygen to keep it going, there’s nothing you can do. They actually tried to put it out by drilling holes into the mine and pouring wet sand down to block off the air supply but it didn’t work. It might not seem like such a big deal since the fire is underground but it really is. The 1000 residents probably didn’t think that is was a big deal either until sulfurous fumes and carbon monoxide almost suffocated everyone in their home. The underground fire fractured the ground making sink holes all over the place. A 12-year-old almost fell in one in 1981. The roads are also affected and have smoke coming out of them! The last time they tried to put it out was in the 1980’s but since then everyone’s just given up. Today about 12 people live in Centralia and it’s a very popular destination for graffiti artists. Check out this artwork all over the road. It also draws UFO seekers... The fire covers 6 square miles and spreads 75 feet every year. While this might seem like a freak accident, these kind of fires are actually pretty common. There are mine fires burning in Wyoming, Australia, Germany, and many other parts of the world. India and China have the most serious problems with hundreds of abandoned mines all over the country. Coal mine fires can burn for centuries and it is estimated that the Central fire could burn for another 250 years!
Views: 69890 Origins Explained
Anthracite Coal Mining Pennsylvania - A Day in the Life of a Coal Miner
 
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A vintage silent film depicting a day in the life of a Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal miner.
Views: 16420 Jim Roberts
Centralia - Hell on Earth - Town destroyed by ever burning coal mines
 
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A 1982 16mm film documenting a Pennsylvania town eroding away from out of control burning of underground coal mines since 1962.
2017 Trending Documentary | World's Dangerous Coal Mines Documentary Movies | History Channel
 
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2017 Trending Documentary | World's Dangerous Coal Mines Documentary Movies | History Channel. Welcome to HISTORY CHANNEL - home of the best documentary films and documentary movies! The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United Kingdom and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery. In Australia, "colliery" generally refers to an underground coal mine. In the United States "colliery" has historically been used to describe a coal mine operation, but the word today is not commonly used. Coal mining has had many developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts, to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyors, jacks and shearers Read more about "2017 Trending Documentary | World's Dangerous Coal Mines Documentary Movies | History Channel": https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining Subscribe to History Channel to be the first to receive updates - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvrAcLlRvwC9VvC27TExjTQ Join us in our nature documentary films community discussion by following us in our documentary Google+ page - https://plus.google.com/u/0/b/114900893448977803177 Thanks for watching HISTORY CHANNEL - home of the best documentary films and documentary movies! #Animals #Nature #Education #History #NatureDocumentaryFilms #DocumentaryMovies Thanks for watching "2017 Trending Documentary | World's Dangerous Coal Mines Documentary Movies | History Channel"
Views: 127 Dansbyx Sybil
Urban Exploration: Centralia, PA Ghost Town Burning Underground
 
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*UPDATE* The time capsule ended up being opened on October 4, 2014 which was much earlier than expected. Centralia, PA is a modern day ghost town with an ongoing underground inferno. Silent Hill was inspired by Centralia's plight. It was also a model for various movies that wanted to give a hell-like appearance in a ghost town. There used to be a WARNING - DANGER sign posted here from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania stating that walking or driving in this area could result in serious injury or death; that dangerous gases are present and the ground is prone to sudden collapse. Centralia was once a prosperous coal mining town with 1,100 population. It included 4 movie theatres, 7 bars, a school and a gas station. In the spring of 1962, a fire which started at the town dump during spring cleanup ignited the coal present at the ground level as this area is very rich in coal. As firefighters worked to try and extinguish that fire, it had already spread to the underground abandoned coal tunnels that are 100 meters in depth. After a couple of decades, attempts to put out the fire failed. State and federal authorities said they didn't have enough funding to do the job right. They tried digging up the coal around the burn site but it was burning faster than they could dig and there are too many tunnels too flood. Approximately 450 acres of underground coal has been on fire since. This type of coal is called anthracite which is difficult to ignite, but very difficult to extinguish. There are 3000 acres of coal field here underground, so with enough oxygen feeding this fire from other mining tunnels, the fire is expected to last at least another 100-200 years, maybe longer. The temperature of the active burn area below ground is 1100-1200 degrees Farhenheit. Tests by scientists and geologists were done here that showed the ground temperature to be around 440 degrees Celsius a foot into the ground. With the threats of hydrogen explosions, carbon monoxide and cave-ins, most residents were relocated in the 80s. The houses were then torn down leaving approximately 11 people behind who refused to evacuate despite the danger and risks involved such as dangerous gasses, explosions and sink holes. The ground beneath could collapse and has done so already. Looking down the now-empty streets, you can see that nature has reclaimed her land, albeit, a dangerous one. Buildings, cars and trees can fall into this pit at any time. The old Hwy 61 that used to bring traffic to Centralia has been destroyed by the underground fire. It is constantly subsiding with smoke usually billowing out from the pits and separations that will continue to get wider and deeper day-by-day. This is called subsidence. This is due to the coal seams the run below ground at steep angles which cause the road above ground to collapse as the coal burns. According to engineers, the only way to stop this fire is to dig the entire 3000 acres of coal field under this town and surrounding area. This would cost $600 million which is more than the US governments were willing to pay. Ironically, a small town just south of Centralia, Byrnesville (of all names) was also evacuated and now empty. Mostly coal miners resided here of an Irish-Catholic desent. Both Centralia and Byrnesville were a tight-knit community, and many did not want to leave. There is a time capsule that still lies buried in the ground in Centralia. This was set up as a memorial for the working class town to be opened in 2016 which would be Centralia's 150th Anniversary. Whether the residents return to open it on that date is yet to be seen. The Weather Channel selected portions of this video for their "Most Toxic Ghost Towns" video. In case you're interested, here is the link: http://www.weather.com/video/most-toxic-ghost-towns-46257?collid=/news/top-stories Thanks for watching!
Views: 413354 TikiTrex
Hillbillies, Coalminers, Treehuggers and God | Explore Films
 
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http://www.explore.org - Travel to the heart of Appalachia and experience the hidden gem that is West Virginia. Feel the pulse of coal mining running through the veins of locals as well as hear the environmental opposition to the practice in this moving Explore special. Love Exploring - Subscribe http://goo.gl/q8AqMp http://explore.org - Facebook http://goo.gl/SFRAfX - Twitter http://goo.gl/n03NNU http://Explore.org is the worlds leading philanthropic live nature cam network and documentary film channel. Be sure to visit and subscribe to all your favorite EXPLORE channels. Explore Main Channel https://goo.gl/9L2vjH Explore Africa https://goo.gl/8GXlAz Explore Bears & Bison https://goo.gl/bKBhR8 Explore Birds Bats Bees https://goo.gl/chM5Zp Explore Cats Lions Tigers https://goo.gl/1m3vAd Explore Farm Life https://goo.gl/KVU98J Explore Dog Bless You https://goo.gl/F01N6i Explore Oceans https://goo.gl/6lKaus Explore Sunsets https://goo.gl/zfG1DI Explore Zen Dens https://goo.gl/Id1WMF
Vintondale full movie
 
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was made around 1928, it is a quasi-documentary about the times of the coal mining area, started by the Delano's, uncle of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. It is somewhat long and slow at times
Views: 548 JAE462
Abandoned Mining Village Eckley PA Ghost Town Part 1
 
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This is Part one of the abandoned mining town of Eckley Pennsylvania. This mining town was featured in the early 1970's movie The Molly Maguires starring Sean Connery . There was some Hollywood props left behind and the cinematic illusion against the real hard coal mining history was an interesting dichotomy to say the least . I'm a firm believer that travel is the best education , I've learned so much over the past year and can't wait for the next year . In your in central northern Pennsylvania check this old town out you won't be disappointed. Follow me as I travel North America in my vintage camper van hunting down beautiful and historic places. Buckle up for the ultimate road trip adventure hosted by yours truly. Like my Facebook page a Life Worth Finding Follow my Tumblr blog a Life Worth Finding Like share comment and subscribe
DEAD MALLS AND GHOST TOWNS - Exploring the Coal Region of Pennsylvania
 
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I recently did a Pennsylvania tour of 5 abandoned locations. Today we head into the coal region to explore the struggling communities. Check out the raw footage from Schuylkill mall here: https://youtu.be/X7AE83jG8Po Thanks for watching!
Views: 4196 theVHSvlog
knox mine disaster location and footage
 
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Please like & subscribe to JP Videos This video shows the location of the knox mine disaster and shows how it looks today as well as footage from 1959. enjoy Don't forget to like my page https://www.facebook.com/JPVideos81 At approximately 11:20 a.m., two laborers in the Pittston vein heard a sharp “popping” sound. They quickly called upon John Williams, the assistant foreman. The three employees hurried to escape and notify superintendent Robert Groves, who immediately ordered an evacuation, although he withheld the severity of the situation. Unfortunately, the other three men who were stationed in this vein could not escape in time and the fierce waters of the Susquehanna took their lives. While millions of gallons of water flooded into the mine, thirty-three men managed to catch the last elevators at the May shaft, but forty-five others remained trapped, desperately seeking their own outlet. During the first sixty four hours of the emergency, an estimated 2.7 million gallons of water per minute streamed underground from an enormous whirlpool near the riverbank. Down below, thirty-two men wandered in two separate groups until they managed to escape through the abandoned Eagle air shaft. Pennsylvania Coal Company surveyor, Joe Stella, led the first group of seven. He not only knew the mines well, but also possessed maps which allowed his group to find a direct course to the opening. The second group, led by Myron Thomas, consisted of twenty-five men who wandered for hours before they found their way to safety. Unfortunately, twelve of the original remaining bodies have never been recovered. Thousands of bails of hay and hundreds of railroad ties were also added. Culm, dirt, and rock along with over 50 coal and railroad cars barely stopped the river. Finally they diverted the river around Wintermoot Island by building dams at both ends of the island. Once they pumped the water out between the dams the size of the hole was evident. Tons of clay and rock were poured into the hole and a concrete cap was placed on top of the opening. They then pumped much of the water out of the mine to look for the 12 missing miners. How could this tragedy have happened? The original plan was to keep 50 feet of rock and coal between the workings and the river bottom. The Knox company wanted this to be lowered to 35 feet. Mine inspectors deemed this ok as it would be sufficient to stand up to the river. At this point the seam of coal sloped up towards the river in what is known as an anticline. Company owners kept pushing the miners closer and closer to the river bottom until the rock could no longer support the river. At the point where the river broke through the rock was only 5 to 6 feet thick! This disaster ended deep mining in the Wyoming valley as almost all of the coal company’s mines connected.
Views: 67471 JPVideos
Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining mesothelioma
 
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Vintage 1920's film showing the workings of an underground Northeastern Pennsylvania Coal Mine. This silent film (originally a 16mm hand-cranked movie) shows the miners arriving at the mine and switching into mining clothes with their street clothes held up by lines near the ceiling. The miner receive safety equipments and electric head lamps and then are issued cases of dynamite. Before entering the mine they update the peg board and take the token that allows the mine operator to know exactly who is in the mine at any given time. Once in the shaft the miners drill a hole in the face of the coal seam and then pack it with the explosives. After the dust clears, the miner and his helper shovel the coal into a cart for movement to the main gangway. There the coal is transferred into larger carts and pulled away by mules. In addition to the mule drivers and 'spraggers' the film shows the coal breaker where boys and disabled men pick the sl
Views: 126 Micheal Cornwell
Exploring Eckleys' Miners Village Ghost Town ("The Molly Maguires" 1969 Movie Filming Location!)
 
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This is a video of Jared and I exploring a large well preserved ghost town called Eckleys Miners' Village. I tried to get everything I could see here in one good video. Took this video on 3/26/16 Eckley Miners' Village in eastern Pennsylvania is an anthracite coal mining patch town that dates back to the early 1800's. Located near Hazleton, Luzerne County, Pennsylvania, in the United States The Molly Maguires a 1970 film was filmed in Eckley in 1969. The wooden "coal breaker" featured heavily in the film was built as a prop. It received little or no maintenance over the years and, even though it has been called a tinderbox, it still stands today — over 40 years later. The company store was also built as a prop for the movie and still stands today. The filming of the movie resulted in the town's being saved from demolition, and it was afterward turned into a mining museum under the control of the Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission.
Views: 1538 Jacob Smith
Coal Mining (1950)
 
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Location unspecified. Coal miners wearing helmets with lights on underground, one sets off an explosion. Miner winds up wire and walks along tunnel. He picks up pick axe, to chip at the side of the coal. CU Three miners crouching close together talking. The men start to pull away the coal using their pickaxes. The coal is thrown in chunks on to a moving conveyor belt. A new beam is put into position to secure the ceiling. Coal is shovelled on to a moving conveyor belt. Mute Col Neg FILM ID:3337.01 A VIDEO FROM BRITISH PATHÉ. EXPLORE OUR ONLINE CHANNEL, BRITISH PATHÉ TV. IT'S FULL OF GREAT DOCUMENTARIES, FASCINATING INTERVIEWS, AND CLASSIC MOVIES. http://www.britishpathe.tv/ FOR LICENSING ENQUIRIES VISIT http://www.britishpathe.com/ British Pathé also represents the Reuters historical collection, which includes more than 120,000 items from the news agencies Gaumont Graphic (1910-1932), Empire News Bulletin (1926-1930), British Paramount (1931-1957), and Gaumont British (1934-1959), as well as Visnews content from 1957 to the end of 1979. All footage can be viewed on the British Pathé website. https://www.britishpathe.com/
Views: 10419 British Pathé
Look inside Pennsylvania's newest coal mine
 
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Somerset County is celebrating the opening of a new deep mine. Coal company officials give us a sneak peek of what is inside this new coal mine.
Views: 7377 PennLive.com
The Molly Maguires: The Life Of A Tragic History
 
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Watch my 7th grade, 10-minute documentary on the Irish Coal Miners of Pennsylvania, and how a major conflict in history was compromised in the late 1800s. Includes photos taken by me in actual locations, along with personal interviews conducted by me.
Views: 36950 Alex Petyerak
centralia pa movie 8-2-2011ghost town+smoking coal mine+deserted roads- town
 
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centralia pa's ghost town-coal burning underground 40+years-deserted town-blocked road-wind mills from afar-taped 8-2-2011
Views: 1240 yuwiez1andonly
Pennsylvania Anthracite Coal Mining
 
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Discover the Delaware & Lehigh Canal, a National Heritage Corridor. Visit http://www.delawareandlehigh.org/talesofthetowpath to learn about the recreational and learning opportunities the Corridor provides today. Tales of the Towpath is a children's book and educational curriculum about a man's return to his childhood, a journey back to an age when anthracite coal was fueling America's industries and canals were the country's highways. Let Finn Gorman guide you back in time on the interactive website at http://www.delawareandlehigh.org/talesofthetowpath.
Views: 5725 Finn Gorman
How Coal Mines Work: "Mining and Preparation of Anthracite Coal" circa 1934 Delaware & Lackawanna
 
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Earth Sciences, mining, oil, etc. playlist:: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL33B1A9216BB65F7A more at http://scitech.quickfound.net Very good demonstration of coal mining processes in the 1930s. 'Underground mining scenes... Sequence shows miners leaving work, washing up and going home to greet families.' Reupload of a previously uploaded film with improved video & sound. Public domain film from the Library of Congress Prelinger Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied. The soundtrack was also processed with volume normalization, noise reduction, clipping reduction, and/or equalization (the resulting sound, though not perfect, is far less noisy than the original). http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%. The term is applied to those varieties of coal which do not give off tarry or other hydrocarbon vapours when heated below their point of ignition. Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the majority of global production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal... blind coal... Kilkenny coal... crow coal... and black diamond. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region. Legend has it that Allen fell asleep at the base of Broad Mountain and woke to the sight of a large fire because his campfire had ignited an outcropping of anthracite coal. By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River. Anthracite was first experimentally burned as a residential heating fuel in the US on 11 February 1808, by Judge Jesse Fell in Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania, on an open grate in a fireplace. Anthracite differs from wood in that it needs a draft from the bottom, and Judge Fell proved with his grate design that it was a viable heating fuel. In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917... From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States, until it was supplanted first by oil burning systems and more recently by natural gas systems... China today mines by far the largest share of global anthracite production, accounting for more than three-quarters of global output. Most Chinese production is of standard-grade anthracite, which is used in power generation. Increased demand in China has made that country into a net importer of the fuel, mostly from Vietnam, another major producer of anthracite for power generation, although increasing domestic consumption in Vietnam means that exports may be scaled back. Current U.S. anthracite production averages around 5 million tons per year. Of that, about 1.8 million tons were mined in the state of Pennsylvania...
Views: 1797 Jeff Quitney
Coal: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
 
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We’ve heard a lot of talk about coal miners in the last year, but what are the real issues surrounding coal? John Oliver and a giant squirrel look into it. Connect with Last Week Tonight online... Subscribe to the Last Week Tonight YouTube channel for more almost news as it almost happens: www.youtube.com/user/LastWeekTonight Find Last Week Tonight on Facebook like your mom would: http://Facebook.com/LastWeekTonight Follow us on Twitter for news about jokes and jokes about news: http://Twitter.com/LastWeekTonight Visit our official site for all that other stuff at once: http://www.hbo.com/lastweektonight
Views: 10582047 LastWeekTonight
The Town That Was - The Movie - Centralia, Pennsylvania
 
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The Town that Was The Town that Was In 1962, a trash fire ignited a seam of anthracite coal beneath Centralia, Pennsylvania, a once thriving mining town of over 1600 people. By the mid 1980’s, giant plumes of smoke and deadly carbon monoxide …
Views: 900 Prattt
The coal mine ax murder movie
 
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i made this up and yah i have more of these type of movies
Views: 100 t jo
COAL MINERS & MINING 1930s GERMAN EDUCATIONAL FILM PART 2 75644
 
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This 1930s German silent educational film shows miners working in the depths of a large coal mine, and their routine underground pulling coal into a long conveyer belt. An underground train system is also seen pulling ore cars out of the mine and into a massive elevator for transport to the surface. Air hammers and other equipment for excavation is also shown. We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example like: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD and 2k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 2906 PeriscopeFilm
"Hard Coal" Last of the Bootleg Miners [Scrapple Docs] Available on SnagFilms
 
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Hard Coal: Last of the Bootleg Miners Directed By Marc Brodzik Editied By Andrew Geller Produced by ScrappleTV Trailer for upcoming documentary Hard Coal: Last of the Bootleg Miners directed by Philadelphia filmmaker/artist Marc Brodzik of Woodshop Films. Hard Coal examines the current plight of the Pennsylvania anthracite independent coal miners. Watch the Film Here: http://www.snagfilms.com/films/title/hard_coal_last_of_the_bootleg_miners?autoplay=true Follow us on Facebook http://Facebook.com/scrappletv Follow us on Twitter http://twitter.com/ScrappleTV Stop by the Website for More News and Infotainment http://scrapple.tv/
Views: 33854 Scrapple TV
ABANDONED Centralia Pennsylvania  GHOST TOWN (REAL SILENT HILL)
 
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merchandise = http://shop.spreadshirt.com/exploringwithjosh/ hope you all enjoyed this ! please subscribe to my gaming channel!! CHECK OUT MY 2ND CHANNEL GUYS!! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQqQJlN8fZO-CDK4JFKotSQ I do NOT vandalize or cause any trouble. I go explore abandoned buildings/ forgotten places because thats what I love to do. I take pictures of the places I explore because to me they are nice . you can see them on my instagram or facebook. Filmed with Samsung Nx1 and Gopro Hero 3 black edition * facebook = https://www.facebook.com/exploringwit... Snapchat = exploringjosh Twitter = https://twitter.com/i_am_joshyo instagram = https://www.instagram.com/exploringwithjosh
Views: 1509149 Exploring With Josh
A Day in the Life of a Wigan Coal Miner 1911
 
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Filmed by Keystone in 1911 for the LNWR ( London & North Western Railway ) who had their own full time film unit. The film was produced to feature both a typical Lancashire colliery served by the LNWR and also the women surface workers or Pit Brow Lasses who had been in the news after moves to legislate against their empoyment on the surface at collieries. More women surface workers were employed at Lancashire collieries than in any other coalfield. The colliery featured was Alexandra Colliery of Wigan Coal & Iron Co Ltd. Shafts were sunk at the colliery from 1856 in an ancient mining district, records going back to the 14th century. The shaft eventually reached 772 yards and the Arley seam. The famous Haigh Cannel seam was also accessed. The colliery closed in June 1955.
Views: 23943 Coal Board
Coal Mucker
 
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Mike gets down and dirty in the coal mine. http://dsc.discovery.com/videos/dirty-jobs-mikes-ridiculous-reactions/?smid=YTDSC-YTD-PLP Tune in Tuesdays at 9PM!
Views: 108965 Discovery
SCRANTON, PENNSYLVANIA COAL MINE COLLAPSE    FRESNO BUDDHIST TEMPLE  USS LOS ANGELES 53474b
 
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This black and white film is one of the episodes of "Yesterday's Newsreels", an early 1950s TV show made from the General Newsreel collection. It features six segments of historic highlights. A City Collapses! 1921. Smoke and flames rise from building tops in Scranton, Pennsylvania. People scramble over walls to escape the area as the ground collapses into an underground coal mine. Houses are collapsed at weird angles. Boys climb out of a house onto its roof (:10-:53). Buddhist Temple in America Middle 1920s. Japanese Americans enter a Buddhist Temple in Fresno, California. Three leaders bow in front of a shrine. Others bow sitting in the pews (1:00-1:18). Service Deluxe 1928. A strongman dressed as a waiter picks up a tableclothed table with just his teeth. He carries an additional two chairs on each arm and moves the table to a new location has the patrons follow. He uses just his teeth and ropes to pick up a man sitting in a chair. He then stacks chairs on a table and tables on tables and picks them up with his teeth (1:24-2:05). Aviation 1927. The USS Los Angeles (ZR-3) is moored at Lakehurst, New Jersey before launch for its inauguration. The cockpit inside the dirigible is shown, as is the view of Baltimore, Annapolis, and the Washington Monument as it sails over. The Captain looks out through binoculars for the landing. The ground crew looks like ants as they scramble across the field and then secure the airship. President and Mrs. Calvin Coolidge christan it the USS Los Angeles (2:10-3:41). Fashions of the Day 1923. The crowd is dressed in 1923 fashions at a dog show. A female trainer wears a masculine-looking coat and pointed shoes. Another pair of women are dressed in calf-length dresses with ruffles on the shirt portion (3:46-4:25). Sports 1925 and 1922. American Helen Wills loses at a tennis match in Paris, France in 1925. In 1922, skiers jump down tall hills at Grand Beach, Michigan. A jumper falls and slides down the hill, injured. The crowd rushes out to help. Olympic ski jumper Anders Haugen wins the competition (4:28-5:37). We encourage viewers to add comments and, especially, to provide additional information about our videos by adding a comment! See something interesting? Tell people what it is and what they can see by writing something for example: "01:00:12:00 -- President Roosevelt is seen meeting with Winston Churchill at the Quebec Conference." This film is part of the Periscope Film LLC archive, one of the largest historic military, transportation, and aviation stock footage collections in the USA. Entirely film backed, this material is available for licensing in 24p HD, 2k and 4k. For more information visit http://www.PeriscopeFilm.com
Views: 1079 PeriscopeFilm
A Tour of the Avondale Mine Site
 
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An extended walking tour of the Plymouth Historical Society's Avondale Mine Site, in Plymouth Twp. Luzerne County, Pa. The trail entrance shown in the video, is located along Rt11, near Syl's Auto Sales, in Plymouth Twp. For more info on the Avondale Mine, anthracite coal mining history in northeast Pa. or the historical society, check out our website. https://www.plymouthistoricalsocietyluzernecopa.org/ We're also on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/Plymouth-Historical-Society-Luzerne-County-182329111815115/?ref=br_rs
Views: 330 Steve Konrad
Anthracite Coal Mining circa (1920)
 
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"Lots of diagrammatic animation. Anthracite coal mining. Underground mining shots." Silent http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anthracite Anthracite... is a hard, compact variety of mineral coal that has a high luster. It has the highest carbon content, the fewest impurities, and the highest calorific content of all types of coals, which also include bituminous coal and lignite. Anthracite is the most metamorphosed type of coal (but still represents low-grade metamorphism), in which the carbon content is between 92.1% and 98%... Anthracite ignites with difficulty and burns with a short, blue, and smokeless flame. Anthracite is categorized into standard grade, which is used mainly in power generation, and high grade (HG) and ultra high grade (UHG), the principal uses of which are in the metallurgy sector. Anthracite accounts for about 1% of global coal reserves, and is mined in only a few countries around the world. China accounts for the lion's share of production; other producers are Russia, Ukraine, North Korea, Vietnam, the UK, Australia and the US. Total production in 2010 was 670 million tons... Terminology Other terms which refer to anthracite are black coal, hard coal, stone coal (not to be confused with the German Steinkohle or Dutch steenkool which are broader terms meaning all varieties of coal of a stonelike hardness and appearance, like bituminous coal and often anthracite as well, as opposed to lignite, which is softer), blind coal (in Scotland), Kilkenny coal (in Ireland), crow coal (or craw coal from its shiny black appearance), and black diamond. "Blue Coal" is the term for a once-popular and trademarked brand... Anthracite is similar in appearance to the mineraloid jet and is sometimes used as a jet imitation. Anthracite differs from ordinary bituminous coal by its greater hardness, its higher relative density of 1.3--1.4, and lustre, which is often semi-metallic with a mildly brown reflection. It contains a high percentage of fixed carbon and a low percentage of volatile matter... The moisture content of fresh-mined anthracite generally is less than 15 percent. The heat content of anthracite ranges from 22 to 28 million Btu per short ton (26 to 33 MJ/kg) on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis... Anthracite may be considered to be a transition stage between ordinary bituminous and graphite, produced by the more or less complete elimination of the volatile constituents of the former... History of mining and use In southwest Wales, anthracite has been burned as a domestic fuel since at least medieval times. It was mined near Saundersfoot. In the United States, anthracite coal history began in 1790 in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, with the discovery of coal made by the hunter Necho Allen in what is now known as the Coal Region... By 1795, an anthracite-fired iron furnace had been built on the Schuylkill River... In spring 1808, John and Abijah Smith shipped the first commercially mined load of anthracite down the Susquehanna River from Plymouth, Pennsylvania, marking the birth of commercial anthracite mining in the United States. From that first mine, production rose to an all-time high of over 100 million tons in 1917. From the late 19th century until the 1950s, anthracite was the most popular fuel for heating homes and other buildings in the northern United States... Many large public buildings, such as schools, were heated with anthracite-burning furnaces through the 1980s... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_mining The goal of coal mining is to obtain coal from the ground. Coal is valued for its energy content, and, since the 1880s, has been widely used to generate electricity. Steel and cement industries use coal as a fuel for extraction of iron from iron ore and for cement production. In the United States, United Kingdom, and South Africa, a coal mine and its structures are a colliery... Coal mining has had a lot of developments over the recent years, from the early days of men tunneling, digging and manually extracting the coal on carts to large open cut and long wall mines. Mining at this scale requires the use of draglines, trucks, conveyor, jacks and shearers...
Views: 60 Old Movies Reborn
1800 Mining Movie
 
01:50
Social Studies Project
Views: 270 Travis Brown