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If You Happy and You Know It Clap Your Hands Song with Lyrics
 
04:34
Watch If You Happy and You Know It Clap Your Hands Song with Lyrics By Geethanjali Videos. If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap clap) If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands (clap clap) If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it If you're happy and you know it, clap your hands. (clap clap) If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp stomp) If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet (stomp stomp) If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it If you're happy and you know it, stomp your feet. (stomp stomp) If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!) If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!) If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it If you're happy and you know it, shout "Hurray!" (hoo-ray!) If you're happy and you know it, do all three (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!) If you're happy and you know it, do all three (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!) If you're happy and you know it, then your face will surely show it If you're happy and you know it, do all three. (clap-clap, stomp-stomp, hoo-ray!) We would love to hear from you so please do leave your comments and share our videos with your loved ones!
Day 1 Keynote: Building a Cloud for Everyone (Cloud Next '18)
 
01:43:52
Get ready to be inspired by speakers who are building a cloud full of opportunity with our partners and customers. This video is also subtitled in Chinese, Indonesian, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese, and Spanish Event schedule → http://g.co/next18 Next ‘18 All Sessions playlist → http://bit.ly/Allsessions Subscribe to the Google Cloud channel! → http://bit.ly/NextSub
Views: 35318 Google Cloud
Fast Arc Trickster build - Path of Exile (3.1 Abyss)
 
07:23
Self cast Arc build as Trickster for more cast and attack speed. Nothing too special. Good clear speed, bad single target. Not for end game. Expensive build. Bestiary league impression and initial thoughts: https://twitter.com/Woolfio_YT/status/964436776285859840 -----Time stamps----- 1:09 About this build and items 5:14 Skills and links 6:06 Passive tree and numbers -----Passive tree----- Level 86: http://poeurl.com/bLBW PoB import code: https://pastebin.com/srQQfuW8 - -----Items----- Inpulsa's Broken Heart Impresence Essence Worm Berek's Grip The Overflowing Chalice The Wise Oak flask Atziri's Promise flask Watcher's Eye jewel - -----Skills and links----- Main setup: Arc + Lightning pen. + Added lightning damage + Arcane surge + Spell echo + Controlled Destruction. Whirling blades + faster attacks + fortify. CWDT + Immortal call. Lightning warp. Conductivity + blasphemy + increased area of effect. Summon lightning golem. Wrath. Vaal Storm call + culling strike + added lightning damage (or whatever) + increased duration. This one is just for fun. Can use Vaal Grace for defense or Vaal Haste for more speed or whatever else you like. - Will try to stream daily at 13:00 UTC+2 (or later if i am making a video) Twitch ► https://www.twitch.tv/woolfio Some news on Twitter ► https://twitter.com/Woolfio_YT -----Support?----- If you would like to support me - check my Patreon page ► https://www.patreon.com/woolfio Your support is greatly appreciated, it may even help change my life.
Views: 20473 Woolfio
Final Fantasy VII - Emerald Weapon without pressing any buttons (Vincent Mug Glitch)
 
02:24
"Oh no, Mug! My only weakness!!!" -Emerald Weapon This strategy isn't entirely mine. It's a modified version of this video's strategy, which was used on Ruby's weapon: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PZBUa-UsBU4 The Setup: Vincent: LV 99: Mag = 255 Weapon: Death Penalty Armor: Wizard Bracialet Accessory: n/a Materia (all mastered except HP-|-MP and Revive): On Weapon: Final Attack=Revive - Final Attack=Steal - Final Attack=KOTR - Final Attack=Steal On Armor: Final Attack=KOTR - Final Attack=Steal - Final Attack=Mime - HP-|-MP Just enter battle and enjoy! Edit: you can put the following combination on the armor and Emerald will die before opening his eyes: Final Attack=KOTR - Final Attack=Mime - Final Attack=Steal - HP-|-MP The reason why I didn't do it, it's because it's too much fun to see what happens in the end :-P What happens in the video: For starters, in FF7 there is a bug in which every time Vincent uses Mug and he's using a rifle-like weapon, the next action's animation is entirely skipped (but the action still does all it has to do). In this case, I'm skipping the KOTR summons and a few Mug animations. With 255 MAG, Vincent is able to deal 9999 damage with each of the 13 KOTR hits. Turn-by-turn events: 1- Enter battle, Emerald uses Emerald Shoot. Vincent dies. The counters for final attacks are queued as follows: Life-Mug-KOTR-Mug-KOTR-Mug-Mime 2- Vincent uses Life on himself. 3- Vincent uses Mug 4- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped) 5- Vincent uses Mug 6- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped) 7- Vincent uses Mug 8- Vincent uses Mime and mimes Mug (Skipped) 9- Emerald uses Emerald Shoot. Vincent dies. The counters for final attacks are queued as follows: Life-Mug-KOTR-Mug-KOTR-Mug-Mime 10- Vincent uses Life on himself. 11- Vincent uses Mug 12- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped) 13- Vincent uses Mug 14- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped) 15- Vincent uses Mug 16- Vincent uses Mime and mimes Mug (Skipped) 17- Emerald opens Eyes and uses Emerald Beam 18- Blue Eye attacks. Vincent dies. The counters for final attacks are queued as follows: Life-Mug-KOTR-Mug-KOTR-Mug-Mime 19- Vincent uses Life on himself. 20- Vincent uses Mug on a random target. 21- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped). The eyes are all dead now, but the game won't actually make them disappear until the event queue is empty, and Vincent still has things to do. The eye's "death animation" is queued after Vincent's counters. 21- Vincent uses Mug. Emerald Weapon queues a Revenge Stamp counter which will go off after Vincent is done with his counters (but before the eye's "death animations"). 22- Vincent uses KOTR (Skipped). Emerald is already dead by now, but the game won't actually make him disappear until all the event queue is empty, so it queues the "death animation" after Emerald's counter. To recap, the event queue is now: Mug-Mime-revenge stamp-kill eyes-kill emerald 23- Vincent uses Mug, but since all the enemies are flagged as dead, the move goes through but does nothing at all. 24- Vincent uses Mime (Skipped) 25. Finally Vincent's counters are done and Emerald can use his Revenge Stamp he had queued. Vincent dies. The counters for final attacks are queued and the event queue now looks like this: Kill eyes-kill emerald-Life-Mug-KOTR-Mug-KOTR-Mug-Mime 26- The game finally removes the eyes and then Emerald Weapon. 27- Vincent uses Life on himself. 28- Vincent uses Mug but there are no targets and the move fails. 29- Vincent uses KOTR but there are no targets and the move fails. 30- Vincent uses Mug but there are no targets and the move fails. 31- Vincent uses KOTR but there are no targets and the move fails. 32- Vincent uses Mug but there are no targets and the move fails. 33- Vincent uses Mime to copy Mug but there are no targets and the move fails. The battle ends!
Views: 169 TheFado96
Meteos Full Stream as Ekko, Corki, Gragas + More - Time Stamps in Description
 
03:22:33
Meteos Stream: www.twitch.tv/meteos GRADING SYSTEM: GRADE A - 5.0 + KDA, GRADE B - 4.0-4.9 KDA, GRADE C - 2.0-3.9 KDA, GRADE D - 1.0-1.9 KDA Game 1 Ekko vs Ahri - 14:05 - GRADE D Game 2 Ekko vs Poppy - 1:08:35 - GRADE A Game 3 Corki vs Lulu - 1:52:37 - GRADE A Game 4 Gragas vs Elise - 2:47:36 - GRADE A Thanks for watching. We aim to upload LoL Pro Vods every day in the exact(best) quality they were streamed in. We organise the videos into separate playlists of each role so they are easy to find. **TO SUBSCRIBE HIT THIS LINK**: http://bit.ly/1hpboxd If you prefer watching League of Legends tournaments then check out our popular Tournament Vods channel below: LoL LCS Highlights: http://bit.ly/18Nq9qZ
Views: 173 Kaza LoL Pro Vods
2000+ Common Swedish Nouns with Pronunciation · Vocabulary Words · Svenska Ord #1
 
03:22:07
First video of the new Swedish Words Series! Thousands of words with native pronunciation. This video shows exactly 2007 common nouns in its indefinite form, with its corresponding "utrum" (en) or "neutrum" (ett) indefinite article. Voice over by Maria Kihlstedt (Gotland, Sweden). ► SWEDISH NOUNS INFO Nouns have two grammatical genders: "utrum" (common) and "neutrum" (neuter), which determine their definite forms as well as the form of any adjectives used to describe them. Noun gender is largely arbitrary and must be memorized; however, around three quarters of all Swedish nouns are common gender. Living beings are often common nouns, like in "en katt" (cat), "en häst" (horse), "en fluga" (fly), etc. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swedish_grammar#Nouns ► WORKFLOW TIPS · Use the SPACE key to pause the video before the article appears and try to guess the pronunciation. · Use the LEFT/RIGHT keys to go back/forward a few seconds and listen to any word again. · Activate the subtitles, translations to many languages are available; although still far from perfect, they can be helpful! · Do you have another tip? Please share it with all us! ► WHAT'S NEXT Videos of verbs and adjectives will come soon! Subscribe here for notification: https://www.youtube.com/c/feqwix?sub_confirmation=1 ____________________ Did you find this video helpful? Any comment or suggestion is welcome! Audio used: "Base Audio Libre de Mots Suédois" from Project Shtooka (http://shtooka.net), used under "Creative Commons BY" license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0).
Views: 278133 feqwix
Our Miss Brooks: Head of the Board / Faculty Cheer Leader / Taking the Rap for Mr. Boynton
 
01:28:40
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 40168 Remember This
The Great Gildersleeve: Gildy Learns to Samba / Should Marjorie Work / Wedding Date Set
 
01:29:30
Premiering on August 31, 1941, The Great Gildersleeve moved the title character from the McGees' Wistful Vista to Summerfield, where Gildersleeve now oversaw his late brother-in-law's estate and took on the rearing of his orphaned niece and nephew, Marjorie (originally played by Lurene Tuttle and followed by Louise Erickson and Mary Lee Robb) and Leroy Forester (Walter Tetley). The household also included a cook named Birdie. Curiously, while Gildersleeve had occasionally spoken of his (never-present) wife in some Fibber episodes, in his own series the character was a confirmed bachelor. In a striking forerunner to such later television hits as Bachelor Father and Family Affair, both of which are centered on well-to-do uncles taking in their deceased siblings' children, Gildersleeve was a bachelor raising two children while, at first, administering a girdle manufacturing company ("If you want a better corset, of course, it's a Gildersleeve") and then for the bulk of the show's run, serving as Summerfield's water commissioner, between time with the ladies and nights with the boys. The Great Gildersleeve may have been the first broadcast show to be centered on a single parent balancing child-rearing, work, and a social life, done with taste and genuine wit, often at the expense of Gildersleeve's now slightly understated pomposity. Many of the original episodes were co-written by John Whedon, father of Tom Whedon (who wrote The Golden Girls), and grandfather of Deadwood scripter Zack Whedon and Joss Whedon (creator of Buffy the Vampire Slayer, Firefly and Dr. Horrible's Sing-Along Blog). The key to the show was Peary, whose booming voice and facility with moans, groans, laughs, shudders and inflection was as close to body language and facial suggestion as a voice could get. Peary was so effective, and Gildersleeve became so familiar a character, that he was referenced and satirized periodically in other comedies and in a few cartoons. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Gildersleeve
Views: 76000 Remember This
Calling All Cars: Old Grad Returns / Injured Knee / In the Still of the Night / The Wired Wrists
 
01:48:25
The radio show Calling All Cars hired LAPD radio dispacher Jesse Rosenquist to be the voice of the dispatcher. Rosenquist was already famous because home radios could tune into early police radio frequencies. As the first police radio dispatcher presented to the public ear, his was the voice that actors went to when called upon for a radio dispatcher role. The iconic television series Dragnet, with LAPD Detective Joe Friday as the primary character, was the first major media representation of the department. Real LAPD operations inspired Jack Webb to create the series and close cooperation with department officers let him make it as realistic as possible, including authentic police equipment and sound recording on-site at the police station. Due to Dragnet's popularity, LAPD Chief Parker "became, after J. Edgar Hoover, the most well known and respected law enforcement official in the nation". In the 1960s, when the LAPD under Chief Thomas Reddin expanded its community relations division and began efforts to reach out to the African-American community, Dragnet followed suit with more emphasis on internal affairs and community policing than solving crimes, the show's previous mainstay. Several prominent representations of the LAPD and its officers in television and film include Adam-12, Blue Streak, Blue Thunder, Boomtown, The Closer, Colors, Crash, Columbo, Dark Blue, Die Hard, End of Watch, Heat, Hollywood Homicide, Hunter, Internal Affairs, Jackie Brown, L.A. Confidential, Lakeview Terrace, Law & Order: Los Angeles, Life, Numb3rs, The Shield, Southland, Speed, Street Kings, SWAT, Training Day and the Lethal Weapon, Rush Hour and Terminator film series. The LAPD is also featured in the video games Midnight Club II, Midnight Club: Los Angeles, L.A. Noire and Call of Juarez: The Cartel. The LAPD has also been the subject of numerous novels. Elizabeth Linington used the department as her backdrop in three different series written under three different names, perhaps the most popular being those novel featuring Det. Lt. Luis Mendoza, who was introduced in the Edgar-nominated Case Pending. Joseph Wambaugh, the son of a Pittsburgh policeman, spent fourteen years in the department, using his background to write novels with authentic fictional depictions of life in the LAPD. Wambaugh also created the Emmy-winning TV anthology series Police Story. Wambaugh was also a major influence on James Ellroy, who wrote several novels about the Department set during the 1940s and 1950s, the most famous of which are probably The Black Dahlia, fictionalizing the LAPD's most famous "cold case", and L.A. Confidential, which was made into a film of the same name. Both the novel and the film chronicled mass-murder and corruption inside and outside the force during the Parker era. Critic Roger Ebert indicates that the film's characters (from the 1950s) "represent the choices ahead for the LAPD": assisting Hollywood limelight, aggressive policing with relaxed ethics, and a "straight arrow" approach. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LAPD
Views: 36714 Remember This
Our Miss Brooks: Convict / The Moving Van / The Butcher / Former Student Visits
 
01:44:19
Our Miss Brooks is an American situation comedy starring Eve Arden as a sardonic high school English teacher. It began as a radio show broadcast from 1948 to 1957. When the show was adapted to television (1952--56), it became one of the medium's earliest hits. In 1956, the sitcom was adapted for big screen in the film of the same name. Connie (Constance) Brooks (Eve Arden), an English teacher at fictional Madison High School. Osgood Conklin (Gale Gordon), blustery, gruff, crooked and unsympathetic Madison High principal, a near-constant pain to his faculty and students. (Conklin was played by Joseph Forte in the show's first episode; Gordon succeeded him for the rest of the series' run.) Occasionally Conklin would rig competitions at the school--such as that for prom queen--so that his daughter Harriet would win. Walter Denton (Richard Crenna, billed at the time as Dick Crenna), a Madison High student, well-intentioned and clumsy, with a nasally high, cracking voice, often driving Miss Brooks (his self-professed favorite teacher) to school in a broken-down jalopy. Miss Brooks' references to her own usually-in-the-shop car became one of the show's running gags. Philip Boynton (Jeff Chandler on radio, billed sometimes under his birth name Ira Grossel); Robert Rockwell on both radio and television), Madison High biology teacher, the shy and often clueless object of Miss Brooks' affections. Margaret Davis (Jane Morgan), Miss Brooks' absentminded landlady, whose two trademarks are a cat named Minerva, and a penchant for whipping up exotic and often inedible breakfasts. Harriet Conklin (Gloria McMillan), Madison High student and daughter of principal Conklin. A sometime love interest for Walter Denton, Harriet was honest and guileless with none of her father's malevolence and dishonesty. Stretch (Fabian) Snodgrass (Leonard Smith), dull-witted Madison High athletic star and Walter's best friend. Daisy Enright (Mary Jane Croft), Madison High English teacher, and a scheming professional and romantic rival to Miss Brooks. Jacques Monet (Gerald Mohr), a French teacher. Our Miss Brooks was a hit on radio from the outset; within eight months of its launch as a regular series, the show landed several honors, including four for Eve Arden, who won polls in four individual publications of the time. Arden had actually been the third choice to play the title role. Harry Ackerman, West Coast director of programming, wanted Shirley Booth for the part, but as he told historian Gerald Nachman many years later, he realized Booth was too focused on the underpaid downside of public school teaching at the time to have fun with the role. Lucille Ball was believed to have been the next choice, but she was already committed to My Favorite Husband and didn't audition. Chairman Bill Paley, who was friendly with Arden, persuaded her to audition for the part. With a slightly rewritten audition script--Osgood Conklin, for example, was originally written as a school board president but was now written as the incoming new Madison principal--Arden agreed to give the newly-revamped show a try. Produced by Larry Berns and written by director Al Lewis, Our Miss Brooks premiered on July 19, 1948. According to radio critic John Crosby, her lines were very "feline" in dialogue scenes with principal Conklin and would-be boyfriend Boynton, with sharp, witty comebacks. The interplay between the cast--blustery Conklin, nebbishy Denton, accommodating Harriet, absentminded Mrs. Davis, clueless Boynton, scheming Miss Enright--also received positive reviews. Arden won a radio listeners' poll by Radio Mirror magazine as the top ranking comedienne of 1948-49, receiving her award at the end of an Our Miss Brooks broadcast that March. "I'm certainly going to try in the coming months to merit the honor you've bestowed upon me, because I understand that if I win this two years in a row, I get to keep Mr. Boynton," she joked. But she was also a hit with the critics; a winter 1949 poll of newspaper and magazine radio editors taken by Motion Picture Daily named her the year's best radio comedienne. For its entire radio life, the show was sponsored by Colgate-Palmolive-Peet, promoting Palmolive soap, Lustre Creme shampoo and Toni hair care products. The radio series continued until 1957, a year after its television life ended. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Our_Miss_Brooks
Views: 27577 Remember This
Dragnet: Big Gangster Part 1 / Big Gangster Part 2 / Big Book
 
01:29:06
Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Dragnet debuted inauspiciously. The first several months were bumpy, as Webb and company worked out the program's format and eventually became comfortable with their characters (Friday was originally portrayed as more brash and forceful than his later usually relaxed demeanor). Gradually, Friday's deadpan, fast-talking persona emerged, described by John Dunning as "a cop's cop, tough but not hard, conservative but caring." (Dunning, 210) Friday's first partner was Sergeant Ben Romero, portrayed by Barton Yarborough, a longtime radio actor. After Yarborough's death in 1951 (and therefore Romero's, who also died of a heart attack, as acknowledged on the December 27, 1951 episode "The Big Sorrow"), Friday was partnered with Sergeant Ed Jacobs (December 27, 1951 - April 10, 1952, subsequently transferred to the Police Academy as an instructor), played by Barney Phillips; Officer Bill Lockwood (Ben Romero's nephew, April 17, 1952 - May 8, 1952), played by Martin Milner (with Ken Peters taking the role for the June 12, 1952 episode "The Big Donation"); and finally Frank Smith, played first by Herb Ellis (1952), then Ben Alexander (September 21, 1952-1959). Raymond Burr was on board to play the Chief of Detectives. When Dragnet hit its stride, it became one of radio's top-rated shows. Webb insisted on realism in every aspect of the show. The dialogue was clipped, understated and sparse, influenced by the hardboiled school of crime fiction. Scripts were fast moving but didn't seem rushed. Every aspect of police work was chronicled, step by step: From patrols and paperwork, to crime scene investigation, lab work and questioning witnesses or suspects. The detectives' personal lives were mentioned but rarely took center stage. (Friday was a bachelor who lived with his mother; Romero, a Mexican-American from Texas, was an ever fretful husband and father.) "Underplaying is still acting", Webb told Time. "We try to make it as real as a guy pouring a cup of coffee." (Dunning, 209) Los Angeles police chiefs C.B. Horrall, William A. Worton, and (later) William H. Parker were credited as consultants, and many police officers were fans. Most of the later episodes were entitled "The Big _____", where the key word denoted a person or thing in the plot. In numerous episodes, this would the principal suspect, victim, or physical target of the crime, but in others was often a seemingly inconsequential detail eventually revealed to be key evidence in solving the crime. For example, in "The Big Streetcar" the background noise of a passing streetcar helps to establish the location of a phone booth used by the suspect. Throughout the series' radio years, one can find interesting glimpses of pre-renewal Downtown L.A., still full of working class residents and the cheap bars, cafes, hotels and boarding houses which served them. At the climax of the early episode "James Vickers", the chase leads to the Subway Terminal Building, where the robber flees into one of the tunnels only to be killed by an oncoming train. Meanwhile, by contrast, in other episodes set in outlying areas, it is clear that the locations in question are far less built up than they are today. Today, the Imperial Highway, extending 40 miles east from El Segundo to Anaheim, is a heavily used boulevard lined almost entirely with low-rise commercial development. In an early Dragnet episode scenes along the Highway, at "the road to San Pedro", clearly indicate that it still retained much the character of a country highway at that time. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_(series)
Views: 72175 Remember This
Tempo Storm Mitch Jones - Pro Player [VOD: Feb 28, 2018]
 
03:58:58
Tempo Storm Mitch Jones - Pro Player [VOD: Feb 28, 2018]
Views: 392 Scuffed Logan Paul
Dragnet: Big Cab / Big Slip / Big Try / Big Little Mother
 
01:51:41
Dragnet is a radio and television crime drama about the cases of a dedicated Los Angeles police detective, Sergeant Joe Friday, and his partners. The show takes its name from an actual police term, a "dragnet", meaning a system of coordinated measures for apprehending criminals or suspects. Scripts tackled a number of topics, ranging from the thrilling (murders, missing persons and armed robbery) to the mundane (check fraud and shoplifting), yet "Dragnet" made them all interesting due to fast-moving plots and behind-the-scenes realism. In "The Garbage Chute" (December 15, 1949), they even had a locked room mystery. Though rather tame by modern standards, Dragnet—especially on the radio—handled controversial subjects such as sex crimes and drug addiction with unprecedented and even startling realism. In one such example, Dragnet broke one of the unspoken (and still rarely broached) taboos of popular entertainment in the episode ".22 Rifle for Christmas" which aired December 22, 1949 and was repeated at Christmastime for the next three years. The episode followed the search for two young boys, Stanley Johnstone and Stevie Morheim, only to discover Stevie had been accidentally killed while playing with a rifle that belonged to Stanley—who'd be receiving it as a Christmas present but opened the box early; Stanley finally told Friday that Stevie was running while holding the rifle when he tripped and fell, causing the gun to discharge, fatally wounding Morheim. NBC received thousands of complaint letters, including a formal protest by the National Rifle Association. Webb forwarded many of the letters to police chief Parker who promised "ten more shows illustrating the folly of giving rifles to children". (Dunning, 211) Another episode dealt with high school girls who, rather than finding Hollywood stardom, fall in with fraudulent talent scouts and end up in pornography and prostitution. Both this episode and ".22 Rifle for Christmas" were adapted for television, with very few script changes, when Dragnet moved to that medium. Another episode, "The Big Trio" (July 3, 1952), detailed three cases in one episode, including reckless and dangerous (in this case, fatal) driving by unlicensed juveniles. With regard to drugs, Webb's strident anti-drug statements, continued into the TV run, would be derided as camp by later audiences; yet his character also showed genuine concern and sympathy for addicts as victims, especially in the case of juveniles. The tone was usually serious, but there were moments of comic relief: Romero was something of a hypochondriac and often seemed henpecked; Frank Smith continually complained about his brother-in-law Armand; though Friday dated, he usually dodged women who tried to set him up with marriage-minded dates. Due in part to Webb's fondness for radio drama, Dragnet persisted on radio until 1957 (the last two seasons were repeats) as one of the last old time radio shows to give way to television's increasing popularity. In fact, the TV show would prove to be effectively a visual version of the radio show, as the style was virtually the same [including the scripts, as the majority of them were adapted from radio]. The TV show could be listened to without watching it, with no loss of understanding of the storyline. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dragnet_%28series%29
Views: 125711 Remember This