Home
Search results “Water pollution from coal mining”
Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes
 
02:54
In Appalachia, coal companies blow the tops off of mountains to get at the coal. The damage this does to the surrounding environment and water supply is devastating. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About From The Ashes: From the Ashes captures Americans in communities across the country as they wrestle with the legacy of the coal industry and what its future should be in the current political climate. From Appalachia to the West’s Powder River Basin, the film goes beyond the rhetoric of the “war on coal” to present compelling and often heartbreaking stories about what’s at stake for our economy, health, and climate. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Coal Mining's Environmental Impact | From The Ashes https://youtu.be/ynN39sfqT8w National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 75858 National Geographic
Coal Valley: The story of B.C.'s quiet water contamination crisis
 
13:41
In this beautiful valley in southern British Columbia — a popular destination for outdoor enthusiasts — a water crisis is slowly unfolding. The Elk Valley is home to some of Canada's largest mines, which grow daily in an unrelenting pursuit of metallurgical coal, used primarily to create steel. With the coal extracted in these mines, owned and operated by one of B.C.'s most influential corporations, Teck Resources, comes selenium, a naturally occurring element that, while fine in small doses, can quickly become toxic to aquatic life. Selenium levels in the Elk Valley are off the charts — far above the limits set out in B.C.'s water quality guidelines. And yet, coal mining operations continue unabated in the Elk, where fish are suffering from misshapen jaws and missing gill plates — signature birth defects caused by selenium poisoning. Now, residents are being warned not to drink water from local wells that are contaminated with selenium at levels above what is considered safe for human consumption. Read more on The Narwhal: http://bit.ly/SeleniumElkValley Don't miss our investigative reporting. Sign up for our weekly newsletter: https://thenarwhal.ca/newsletter
Views: 581 The Narwhal
Cleaning up mine water pollution - Newcastle University
 
02:08
International Research Impact: http://bit.ly/impact-yt A team of civil engineering experts at Newcastle University is helping to tackle the global problem of water pollution caused by mining. Dr Adam Jarvis, Reader in Environmental Engineering, explains the impact of the work and describes a system that is being trialled to remove metal from water without the need for energy or chemicals. The 'vertical flow pond' in the Lake District National Park has been designed in collaboration with the Coal Authority, National Trust and Environment Agency, and funded by the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs. The method could pave the way for cleaning up hundreds of abandoned metal mines across England and potentially the world. Playlist: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLkvcXWNO6pBd6X8D90OAVDulzC2mLl-GR --- Undergraduate: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/undergraduate/ Postgraduate: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/postgraduate/ International Students: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/international/ --- Take a virtual tour of Newcastle University: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/tour/ Student Services: https://my.ncl.ac.uk/students/ Get in touch: http://www.ncl.ac.uk/enquiries/ ---
Views: 3216 Newcastle University
Coal Mining Effects
 
04:13
Video showing the aftermath of coal mining
Views: 24013 Dasberry315
Toxic Waste in the US: Coal Ash (Full Length)
 
24:30
Coal ash, which contains many of the world's worst carcinogens, is what's left over when coal is burnt for electricity. An estimated 113 million tons of coal ash are produced annually in the US, and stored in almost every state — some of it literally in people's backyards. With very little government oversight and few safeguards in place, toxic chemicals have been known to leak from these storage sites and into nearby communities, contaminating drinking water and making residents sick. VICE News travels across the US to meet the people and visit the areas most affected by this toxic waste stream. Since coal production is predicted to remain steady for the next few decades, coal ash will be a problem that will affect the US for years to come. Watch "Showdown in Coal Country" - http://bit.ly/16LRifW Watch "Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City" - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Green Groups Say Another Coal Ash Spill Remains Likely, One Year After North Carolina Accident" - http://bit.ly/1A7dVaC Read "Humans Are Destroying the Environment at a Rate Unprecedented in Over 10,000 Years" - http://bit.ly/1vgvC1R Read "The Economic Cost of Carbon Pollution Is Much Greater Than Estimated, Say Stanford University Researchers" - http://bit.ly/1ATb1b0 Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 188729 VICE News
What Is Water Pollution | Chemistry for All | FuseSchool
 
05:32
Learn the basics about water pollution, whilst learning about environmental chemistry. The substances mankind throws away have polluted lakes, rivers and even the oceans. The United Nations estimate that around 10% of the world’s people do not have access to clean drinking water. The main problem with this untreated water is that it can carry diseases, such as cholera, that spread through untreated human faeces. This is particularly serious in shanty towns near big cities and in refugee camps. Rivers and streams can also be polluted with diseases from water coming from badly managed rubbish dumps. But human sewage is not the only substance that pollutes our water supplies – most of the other substances humans allow to escape into streams, rivers and the oceans, are more a danger to natural ecosystems than to us directly. Chemical fertilisers are much more soluble in water than organic, manure-based fertilisers, so heavy rain can wash them into streams and lakes, causing eutrophication. The fertilisers cause algae to grow very fast forming a mat on the lake surface, which blocks sunlight from the vegetation deeper down, which then dies. Bacteria feed off the dying vegetation and use up the remaining oxygen supply. Once the oxygen has gone all animal life dies and the lake ecosystem is destroyed. If heavy metals, such as lead mercury and cadmium, get into rivers and lakes many animals will die. Radioactive waste is normally stored above ground in water tanks, waiting for a more permanent underground storage where it has to be safe for millions of years. There are fears that these underground stores could fail and contaminate water courses. Following a nuclear disaster, water courses and the oceans can become dangerously polluted with radioactive waste. During mining and drilling operations to extract minerals from the earth, aquifers, which are underground water courses, can become polluted. Huge amounts of plastic thrown away from ships, and washed out to sea from rubbish dumps on land, have ended up floating in huge islands of waste causing a serious threat to fish, seabirds and other marine animals. Coal and oil fuelled power stations have been responsible, more so in the past, for causing acid rain. Fossil fuel and nuclear power stations need large amounts of water for condensing the steam which drives their turbines. This water is usually cooled on site in the great cooling towers that dominate the skyline of power-stations. Even so the water will be returned to the river or sea warmer than before. This can upset the river or sea ecosystems. Although not material pollution this waste heat is a pollutant. SUBSCRIBE to the Fuse School YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. JOIN our platform at www.fuseschool.org This video is part of 'Chemistry for All' - a Chemistry Education project by our Charity Fuse Foundation - the organisation behind The Fuse School. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find our other Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the Fuse School platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
P2W - Wastewater Treatment Solutions for the Mining Industry
 
05:37
P2W offers water treatment solutions for gold mines and acid mine drainage, one system without chemicals for handling cyanides, conductivity and sludge. P2W's technology offers no secondary pollution and no brine streams. P2W is committed to helping the mining sector achieve sustainable solutions while improving production and safeguarding our planet's most valuable resource- water.
Views: 1623 P2W ISRAEL
Chinese Coexist With Coal | The New York Times
 
06:13
Despite China’s pledge to cap and then reduce carbon emissions, coal production continues to grow, creating tough choices for those who work in and live near the mines. Grab the embed code for this video at Times Video: http://nyti.ms/1RV0CA9 Produced by: JONAH M. KESSEL Read the story here: http://nyti.ms/20uZQQx Subscribe to the Times Video newsletter for free and get a handpicked selection of the best videos from The New York Times every week: http://bit.ly/timesvideonewsletter Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Instagram: http://instagram.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytvideo Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. Chinese Coexist With Coal | The New York Times http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
Views: 17386 The New York Times
Stop Appalachian Water Pollution from Mountain Top Removal Coal Mining: The EPA Region 3 Rally
 
12:52
On Jan. 29, 2014, a rally was held outside the EPA Region 3 office in Philadelphia demanding action to end the destruction of Appalachian mountains, streams and waterways.
Views: 456 Philly SierraClub
What Coal Mining Hydrogeology tells us about the Real Risks of Fracking_London Lecture_May 2016
 
01:30:21
Development of shale gas by hydraulic fracturing (‘fracking’) is opposed by campaigners who hypothesise (amongst other things) that potable ground water supplies could be polluted by upward migration of fractures and any fluids they contain. There are very strong reasons for doubting this hypothesis, not least because migration of fractures to prolific aquifers would be highly unlikely to lead to pollution, but almost certain to result in drowning of the shale gas wells, rendering them unusable. Hence, despite having contrasting motivations, shale gas developers and environmental guardians turn out to have a strong common interest in avoiding inter-connection to aquifers. There is in fact a century-long analogue for such a ‘confluence’ of interests, provided by the history of longwall coal mining beneath the sea and major aquifers. Where large-scale mining proceeded from the surface downwards, major hydraulic inter-connection of shallow and deep zones did indeed result in widespread water pollution. However, where new mines were developed at depth without any connections to shallow old workings), complete hydraulic isolation from the near-surface hydrogeological environment was successfully maintained. This was despite the fact that longwall mining produced far greater stratal disruption than shale gas fracking ever could. A detailed example is presented from the successful operation of the Selby Coalfield beneath one of the UK’s main aquifers. This profound and sustained historical analogue provides a very clear lesson: given the lack of hydrogeological connectivity to shallow aquifers, shale gas fracking per se cannot contaminate shallow ground water. Provided operators observe long-established laws governing hydrocarbon wells and associated surface operations, other hydrogeological risks will also be minimal. Opponents of shale gas developments should therefore focus attention on more realistic potential impacts, most of which are familiar from almost any planning application, such as increased truck traffic on minor roads. Speaker Biography Paul Younger (University of Glasgow) Paul L Younger FREng holds the Rankine Chair of Engineering and is Professor of Energy Engineering at the University of Glasgow. He was formerly Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Engagement at Newcastle University, where he also established and led the Sir Joseph Swan Institute for Energy Research and, subsequently, the Newcastle Institute for Research on Sustainability. A geologist by first degree, Paul trained in hydrogeology in the USA as a Harkness Fellow in the mid-1980s, subsequently developing a career in environmental engineering. He is perhaps best known for his research and outreach on the environmental management of water in active and abandoned mines worldwide, which won the Queen’s Anniversary Prize for Higher Education for Newcastle University in 2005. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society and a Chartered Geologist, as well as a Chartered Engineer. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Academy of Engineering in 2007 and has received honorary doctorates for his mine water pollution work from leading universities in Spain and South America. His current research focuses on deep geothermal. In parallel with his mainstream academic work, Paul has founded and directed four companies in the water and energy sectors and has authored more than 400 items in the international literature, including the well-received books “Mine Water: Hydrology, pollution, remediation” (Kluwer, 2002), “Groundwater in the Environment: An Introduction” (Blackwell, 2007), “Water: all that matters” (Hodder, 2012) and “Energy: all that matters” (Hodder, 2014). His knowledge of shale gas was gained through serving on the Joint Royal Academies’ Expert Panel, which reported to the UK government in 2012, and on the Independent Expert Panel on Unconventional Gas, which reported to the Scottish Government in June 2014. When not otherwise engaged, Paul’s preferred activities include exploring the Scottish Highlands and Islands, singing and playing traditional music, and indulging his love of the Spanish and Gaelic languages and cultures. Website: www.geolsoc.org.uk Twitter: www.twitter.com/geolsoc
Views: 4012 GeologicalSociety
Toxic Waste Spill in North Carolina: Coal Ash (Part 1)
 
16:16
Coal ash, which contains many of the world's worst carcinogens, is what's left over when coal is burnt for electricity. An estimated 113 million tons of coal ash are produced annually in the US, and stored in almost every state — some of it literally in people's backyards. With very little government oversight and few safeguards in place, toxic chemicals have been known to leak from these storage sites and into nearby communities, contaminating drinking water and making residents sick. On February 2, 2014, up to 39,000 tons of coal ash and 27 million gallons of contaminated water spilled out into the Dan River in North Carolina after a pipe broke underneath a coal ash pond at a Duke Energy power plant. The environmental disaster thrust Duke Energy, the country’s largest electricity company, into the spotlight, revealing a history of violations and inadequate oversight of ponds at all of its plants across the state. In part one, VICE News travels to North Carolina to visit a river that’s been poisoned with arsenic from a nearby Duke Energy site, speak with a resident who has found toxic heavy metals in her drinking water, and question a Duke Energy spokesperson about the power company’s policies. Watch "Showdown in Coal Country" - http://bit.ly/16LRifW Watch "Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City" - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Humans Are Destroying the Environment at a Rate Unprecedented in Over 10,000 Years" - http://bit.ly/1vgvC1R Read "The Economic Cost of Carbon Pollution Is Much Greater Than Estimated, Say Stanford University Researchers" - http://bit.ly/1ATb1b0 Read "The EPA Tightened Rules on Coal Waste, But Not Enough, Say Environmentalists” - http://bit.ly/1vXglsH Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 178069 VICE News
Indonesian coal water video
 
02:25
Indonesia may be famous for its orangutans and its virgin forests - but it is also the world’s largest thermal coal exporter, with thousands of coal mines pitting the landscape. A Greenpeace investigation found some coal mines are allowing waste water with high levels of acid and heavy metals to be discharges into the environment in South Kalimantan. Full story: http://bit.ly/1BcLYzf
Views: 1424 Greenpeace Unearthed
Coal 101: What's Wrong with Coal?
 
02:18
http://www.beyondcoal.org From mining, to burning, to disposal, coal is wreaking havoc on our health and our planet. Powering our country by burning coal is dangerous. It's time to transition Beyond Coal to clean, renewable sources of energy. Learn more and take action on our website http://www.beyondcoal.org - Founded by legendary conservationist John Muir in 1892, the Sierra Club is now the nation's largest and most influential grassroots environmental organization -- with more than two million members and supporters. Our successes range from protecting millions of acres of wilderness to helping pass the Clean Air Act, Clean Water Act, and Endangered Species Act. More recently, we've made history by leading the charge to address climate disruption by moving away from the dirty fossil fuels and toward a clean energy economy. Visit us here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SierraClub Twitter: https://twitter.com/sierraclub Instagram: https://instagram.com/sierraclub
Views: 131434 NationalSierraClub
Coal Water Pollution
 
00:57
Views: 17 Stripe911
U.S.: Toxic Waters: Coal in the Water | The New York Times
 
03:27
Jennifer Hall-Massey of Prenter, W.Va., explains how water pollution, which she believes is caused by nearby coal companies, has impacted her family and community. Related Article: http://bit.ly/2YIg0j Subscribe to the Times Video newsletter for free and get a handpicked selection of the best videos from The New York Times every week: http://bit.ly/timesvideonewsletter Subscribe on YouTube: http://bit.ly/U8Ys7n Watch more videos at: http://nytimes.com/video --------------------------------------------------------------- Want more from The New York Times? Twitter: https://twitter.com/nytvideo Instagram: http://instagram.com/nytvideo Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nytimes Google+: https://plus.google.com/+nytimes Whether it's reporting on conflicts abroad and political divisions at home, or covering the latest style trends and scientific developments, New York Times video journalists provide a revealing and unforgettable view of the world. It's all the news that's fit to watch. On YouTube. U.S.: Toxic Waters: Coal in the Water http://www.youtube.com/user/TheNewYorkTimes
Views: 5726 The New York Times
The Devastating Effects Of Gold Mining
 
04:30
How Algae Could Change The Fossil Fuel Industry https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCNkmi7VE0I » Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe Gold has been a valuable commodity for centuries, but the process to obtain it has dangerous costs. So what is true price of gold? Learn More: National Geographic: The Real Price of Gold http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2009/01/gold/larmer-text/3 Business Insider: The Cost Of Mining An Ounce Of Gold http://www.businessinsider.com/the-cost-of-mining-gold-2013-6 Al Jazeera: The true price of gold http://america.aljazeera.com/watch/shows/techknow/articles/2015/6/4/the-true-price-of-gold.html More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld
Views: 143066 NowThis World
Treating water from former coal mines - how does this work?
 
00:36
The Coal Authority has over 20 years’ experience in preventing and treating water pollution from abandoned coal mines. We manage over 70 coal and metal mine water treatment schemes across Britain.
Views: 899 The Coal Authority
The Devastating Effects of Pollution in China (Part 1/2)
 
13:58
We went to the single most polluted place on earth, the coal-mining town of Linfen in Shanxi Province, China, where kids play in dirty rivers and the sun sets early behind a thick curtain of smog. Watch part 2 here: http://bit.ly/Toxic-China-2 Check out "Toxic: America's Water Crisis" here: http://bit.ly/Water-Crisis-1 Check out the Best of VICE here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Best-Of Check out our full video catalog: http://bit.ly/VICE-Videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 2180689 VICE
How South Africa's coal mines are contaminating groundwater | Global 3000
 
04:30
South Africa has a surfeit of fossil fuels and other natural resources but the country's demand for energy is growing fast. Supply problems have become commonplace in recent years. South Africa is faced with a dilemma: Should it invest in renewable energies or carry on exploiting its extensive reserves of fossil fuels? Find out more: www.dw.de/dw/episode/0,,16172088,00.html
Views: 1365 DW News
PKG Coal Water Pollution
 
01:34
Coal-Fired Power Plant Water Pollution in Michigan interview with Mary Brady of Clean Water Action
Views: 90 Kelsey Knapp
Coal Mines |Coal Water
 
00:46
This is about http://www.lincenergy.us The world may face an energy crisis in the not too distant future as a direct result of the rapidly depleting global reserves of oil.Many leading industry analysts believe that world oil production is about to peak and that we must find alternative sources of energy other than crude oil.This is the key to the Linc Energy vision.
Views: 556 lincenergy
The Health Impacts of Coal
 
03:49
Polluting our air, water, and land, coal production and usage profoundly affects our environment. Clean air, clean water - our birthright? This previews the documentary: Burning the Future: Coal in America directed by David Novack. This compelling documentary explores the effects the nation's coal dependency has on the residents of the Appalachian states, a region plagued by toxic water, devastating floods and disappearing mountain ranges. Novack's cameras observe West Virginian activists mount a seemingly impossible battle against the U.S. government-backed coal industry to save their families, their communities and their way of life.
Views: 8099 SustainableGuidance
Coal Dust in water @ pollution level of Dhanbad
 
01:23
Groundwater quality assessment of Dhanbad district, Jharkhand, India the overall water quality in the Dhanbad coal mining area of India is difficult due to the spatial variability of multiple contaminants and wide range of indicators. Groundwater, Coal Mining, GIS, Contamination Dhanbad.
Views: 22 kamalesh samal
Coal Power Plants are the Largest Source of Toxic Water Contamination
 
11:16
Director of Beyond Coal Campaign at Sierra Club, Mary Anne Hitt, discusses Trump administration's assault on environmental regulations that protect drinking water and health from coal plant wastewater dumping and how activists organize against them Visit http://therealnews.com for more stories and help support our work by donating at http://therealnews.com/donate.
Views: 2147 The Real News Network
Too much coal, very little water
 
03:49
January 15; Ramgarh, Jharkhand Unchecked mining leads to many adversities, dropping levels of water in the ground is one of them. Parej East Mining Project, in Ramgarh district of Jharkhand, has left the surrounding areas dry. Villagers who work as manual labourers have no access to drinkable water and the only source of water is a polluted stream nearby. For those who gave up their lands on the promise of economic development, the present working conditions are like salt on their wounds. Community Correspondent Basanti Soren reports. Call to Action: Please call the General Manager of the East Parej Mining Project on +91 8987784281 and ask him to ensure that the workers at the site get drinking water and other facilities. Also read: http://www.videovolunteers.org/land-taken-on-name-of-development-but-no-compensation-mandu-block-ramgarh-jharkhand/
Views: 5838 VideoVolunteers
EPA Testimony: Toxic water pollution from coal-fired power plants
 
03:10
On July 31, 2017, Kathy Attar, PSR Toxics Program Manager, delivered testimony on the health impacts of coal ash discharge into our water supplies at an EPA hearing on the Clean Water Act. Coal-fired power plants are the single largest source of toxic water pollution in the U.S.
How Does Mining Affect the Environment? You'll Be Shocked to Know
 
03:40
Find more effects of mining right here: http://www.buzzle.com/articles/how-does-mining-affect-the-environment.html Mining is the source of all the substances that cannot be obtained by industrial processes or through agriculture. Mining reaps huge profits for the companies that own them and provides employment to a large number of people. It is also a huge source of revenue for the government. Despite its economic importance, the effects of mining on the environment is a pressing issue. Mining activities require the clearing of large areas of land. The chemicals used in the mining process often escape into the environment causing pollution. Watch this video to know how mining affects the environment.
Views: 18862 Buzzle
TYI (Water)
 
14:25
This video was created by the people of Aretika - a small village located along the Simsang river in the South Garo Hills, Meghalaya, India Traditionally, the people of Aretika have always been dependent on fishery to provide for their daily bread. In recent years however, the Simsang river has become heavily polluted as a result of the exploitation of numerous illegal coal mines along its banks. The amounts of fish in the Simsang river have decreased severely, and the fish that are left are often found floating belly up already. The ongoing pollution of the Simsang river has forced the people living alongside its banks to find alternative sources of livelihood. Many have turned to the expanding coal mine industry to be able to provide for their families. Most families have begun to filter the coal debris flowing out from the mines into the river, in order to sell it, while others are transporting the coal in trucks or small boats, or are even working as daily labourers in the mines themselves. "TYI" (Atong for water) shows how the people of Aretika are facing several issues, all related to water: pollution due to mining and water shortages caused by widescale deforestation. It was made during a participatory video project facilitated by Megan Haagh and Paul Hendrix (reporters from the 'What if We Change' project) as part of a capacity building programme in participatory video facilitation by InsightShare (www.insightshare.org). It was funded by IUCN Netherlands.
Views: 18503 InsightShare
Living Without Water: Contamination Nation
 
15:53
There are tens of thousands of Americans living without clean, running water on the Navajo Nation today. This is because decades of uranium mining have contaminated the majority of water sources on the reservation. VICE News travels to New Mexico to find out how people are coping, and if there is hope for the future. Read "The World Is Running Out of Water" - http://bit.ly/1Hd3jwN Read ​"The Value of Water on the West Coast — And Why California Is So Screwed" - http://bit.ly/1MH19Cw Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 315366 VICE News
Acid Mine Drainage Water Pollution 1951 Pennsylvania Sanitary Water Board
 
00:46
This is clipped from the film, Waters of the Commonwealth, was prepared by the Pennsylvania Sanitary Water Board in 1951 to carry the story of water pollution control directly to the general public. Abandoned mine drainage is water that is polluted from contact with mining activity, and normally associated with coal mining. It is a common form of water pollution in Pennsylvania and in other states where vast amounts of mining took place in the past. There are several issues with abandoned mines that impact water quality: acid mine drainage, alkaline mine drainage (this typically occurs when calcite or dolomite is present) and metal mine drainage (high levels of lead or other metals drain from these abandoned mines). Acid mine drainage is the formation and movement of highly acidic water rich in heavy metals. This acidic water forms through the chemical reaction of surface water (rainwater, snowmelt, pond water) and shallow subsurface water with rocks that contain sulfur-bearing minerals, resulting in sulfuric acid. Heavy metals can be leached from rocks that come in contact with the acid, a process that may be substantially enhanced by bacterial action. The resulting fluids may be highly toxic and, when mixed with groundwater, surface water and soil, may have harmful effects on humans, animals and plants. The film was done during the term of Pennsylvania Governor James Duff who initiated programs to clean up polluted streams, including the highly industrialized Schuylkill River near Philadelphia, which became a model for other polluted rivers around the country. He also tightened anti-pollution laws for mining companies, despite their strong opposition from mining special interests. For more on the history and work of the Sanitary Water Board, read their 1971 final report at http://www.portal.state.pa.us/portal/server.pt/community/history_of_environmental_programs/13897/pa_sanitary_water_board_report_/588469 . The entire film is available at the US National Archive at College Park, Maryland.
Views: 1700 markdcatlin
pollution
 
06:17
dangerous for coal mines area
Views: 30 sikandar anis
blackfields: poland's coal industry
 
04:38
Poland is the second largest coal producer and consumer in all of Europe and consequently one of the most polluted and polluting countries. From all fossil fuels brown coal is the one that has the biggest impact on climate change, producing 1/3 of the worlds CO2 emissions. Pep Bonet visited the region of Upper Silesia -- one of the most heavily industrialized and polluted areas in the continent -- to document the environmental and humanitarian impact of coal mining. During his trip to Poland Pep visited "Adamow", a coal mine that pumps 80 to 120 million-m3 of water out of the ground every year. Dry grounds enable the extraction of brown coal but the lack of water makes the land infertile affecting the life of local inhabitants. Pep: "the surrounding burnt-out landscape is littered with heaps of coal waste, trucks and excavators. Deep in the mine, conveyor belts slither along, laden with earth and rock. On the observation deck built around the hole, people fall silent; the view has a sobering effect". Poland has one of the highest numbers of lakes in the world and the current developments of expanding mining throughout the country will have a serious impact on these natural resources. Devastating effects can occur on the fragile ecosystem endangering several species. Marshes and peat bogs can also dry up, causing irreversible destruction. Researchers believe that the impact of these new mining operations will affect not only surrounding areas but also regions hundreds of kilometers away. If mining companies continue to refuse considering these facts and reevaluate their plans, the damage caused by opencast mining in Poland might have only begun. Based on a story by Marta Kazmierska | Greenpeace. © Pep Bonet
Views: 1913 Pep Bonet
River pollution due to coal mining.
 
01:14
This video is about the river pollution in Hazaribag dist in Jharkhand state of India. This river is flowing through coal field area of Barkagaon block. Water is black due to coal waste of that area. People of the villages depend on this river for their daily uses.
Views: 44 Nitish Priyadarshi
South African Mine Pollution
 
02:55
A South African charity has warned that mining companies are flouting environmental laws in the belief they have political backing. The Bench Mark Foundation says thousands of ageing mines are devastating already desperately poor communities. CCTV's Guy Henderson reports from the Coronation Coal mine, in Mpumalanga province
Views: 2618 CGTN Africa
video evidence of coal mine pollution part 2
 
05:57
a stream of nasty coal infused water is followed from where the worker is washing it down the sidewalk into the public water way it enters
Views: 299 strawberryziti85
San Francisco Pollution Liability: Coal Mining
 
00:37
Although the usage of coal for electricity has gone down in recent years, coal mining still remains a valuable industry in the energy sector. Despite rising concerns about global warming in the U.S., large coal companies maintain that coal-fired power can be environmentally sustainable, and beneficial to the energy practices of Americans. Still though, coal mining comes with risks; with the environmental impact of the coal industry affecting land use, waste management, water, and air pollution. Atmospheric pollution is not the only type of pollution that raises concern; coal burning produces many solid waste products annually. These products include fly ash, bottom ash, flue-gas desulfurization sludge that contains mercury, among other chemicals, and more. According to environmental advocates, such as the writers for DeSmogBlog.com, research has found that a typical-sized coal-burning electricity plant in the U.S. puts out approximately 3.7 million tons of carbon dioxide, 10,000 tons of sulfur dioxide, 10,200 tons of nitrogen oxide, and more, per year. These sources say that a standard 500 megawatt coal-fired electrical plant burns about 1,430,000 tons of coal, uses 2.2 billion gallons of water, and uses 146,000 tons of limestone each year as well. Needless to say, owning and operating a coal mining company or any other type of energy production company comes with inherent risks. At DiNicola Insurance Services, we understand these risks; which is why we offer a comprehensive San Francisco Pollution Liability Program for business in the energy sector, as well as other various industries. Please contact us today for more information at (855) 247-1912. http://www.dinicolains.com/sf-pollution-liability-value-risks-coal-mining/
Views: 128 DiNicolaInsurance
Cursed by Coal: Mining the Navajo Nation
 
13:41
There's a resource curse on the Navajo Nation. The 27,000-square-mile reservation straddling parts of Arizona, New Mexico, and Utah has an extremely high abundance of many energy resources — particularly coal. That coal is what's burned to provide much of the Southwest with electricity, and it creates jobs for the Navajo. But the mining and burning have also caused environmental degradation, serious health issues, and displacement. VICE News travels to the Navajo Nation to find out how its abundance of coal is affecting the future of the Navajo people. Watch “Toxic: Coal Ash” - http://bit.ly/1zDaW66 Watch “Petcoke: Toxic Waste in the Windy City” - http://bit.ly/1E2YejO Read "Line 61, the Oil Pipeline That Will Dwarf Keystone XL” - http://bit.ly/18iOKad Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 191584 VICE News
Water pollution found at coal ash dumps
 
02:11
Duke Energy confirmed reports that tests have shown trace amounts of radioactivity in groundwater around some of its coal ash plants.
Views: 43 WCNC
Water pollution in mining communities in Ghana
 
02:30
Water pollution in mining communities in Ghana
Views: 1160 message2man
South African Gauteng Residents Face Water Pollution Over Mining
 
02:58
For more information log on to http://www.channelstv.com
Views: 423 Channels Television
Water pollution near Rawl, WV
 
01:36
Mountaintop removal is the process of destroying a mountain to extract the coal. Courtesy of upcoming documentary: American Coal www.fireflypix.com This is part of the National Memorial for the Mountains at www.ilovemountains.org
Views: 3258 AppalachianVoices
video evidence of coal mine pollution part 1
 
00:42
A worker for the local coal mines washes settled coal dirt into local waterways
Views: 273 strawberryziti85
Mine Water Polluting Local Creeks And Streams
 
04:11
Mine Water Polluting Local Creeks And Streams. In this case Deer Creek which is an active trout stream (located in the suburbs of Pittsburgh) is being polluted everyday, the pH of the creek is being dropped significantly. The creek flows into The Allegheny River which has a water treatment center located along its banks, this treatment center supplies the entire city with its water. Hmm, gross you out yet?
Views: 771 Luke DukeTv
Why Clean Coal Is A Myth
 
04:48
Coal is cheap, efficient, and plentiful-- but horrible for the environment. What about clean coal? Does clean coal exist? Relocating A 3-ton Rhino In Nepal (360 Video): https://youtu.be/XS1sgeIW2SQ The Crazy Plan to Capture and Store CO2 Under the Ocean - https://youtu.be/ozgROE1xCM4 What Ever Happened To Acid Rain? - https://youtu.be/6oe89mDei8I Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here - http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Read More: The fuel of the future, unfortunately http://www.economist.com/news/business/21600987-cheap-ubiquitous-and-flexible-fuel-just-one-problem-fuel-future "Such arguments are the basis of a new PR campaign launched by Peabody, the world's largest private coal company (which unlike some rivals is profitable, thanks to its low-cost Australian mines). And coal would indeed be a boon, were it not for one small problem: it is devastatingly dirty." Polluted air causes 5.5 million deaths a year new research says http://www.bbc.com/news/science-environment-35568249 "Most of these deaths are occurring in the rapidly developing economies of China and India. The main culprit is the emission of small particles from power plants, factories, vehicle exhausts and from the burning of coal and wood." China May Not Find Enough Coal to Burn https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/china-may-not-find-enough-coal-to-burn/ "Energy-guzzling China is facing a coal conundrum. Rapid urbanization and industrialization will keep China's coal consumption at record highs of around 4 billion tons per year by 2015. At the same time, the country will have to fight for coal security and to keep its supply line uninterrupted, according to the first energy outlook report from China's Energy Research Institute (ERI)." ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos daily. Watch More DNews on Seeker http://www.seeker.com/show/dnews/ Subscribe now! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=dnewschannel DNews on Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Trace Dominguez on Twitter https://twitter.com/tracedominguez DNews on Facebook https://facebook.com/DiscoveryNews DNews on Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews Discovery News http://discoverynews.com Sign Up For The Seeker Newsletter Here: http://bit.ly/1UO1PxI Special thanks to Jules Suzdaltsev for hosting DNews! Check Jules out on Twitter: https://twitter.com/jules_su
Views: 152784 Seeker
Blowing Up Mountains: Destroying the Environment for Coal
 
20:30
Massive corporations are blowing up mountains and creating environmental ruins in West Virginia. All this devastation, just to extract some coal. We went to West Virginia to investigate mountain-top removal -- which a way of extracting coal from deposits under mountains. Instead of drilling into the mountain and sending men underground to take out the coal in the traditional way, they just take the whole top of a mountain off. Hosted by Derrick Beckles | Originally aired on http://VICE.com in 2009 Watch more VICE documentaries here: http://bit.ly/VICE-Presents Subscribe for videos that are actually good: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE Check out our full video catalog: http://www.youtube.com/user/vice/videos Videos, daily editorial and more: http://vice.com Like VICE on Facebook: http://fb.com/vice Follow VICE on Twitter: http://twitter.com/vice Read our tumblr: http://vicemag.tumblr.com
Views: 324605 VICE
Pollution at Yallourn coal mine
 
00:43
On 6 June the Yallourn coal mine collapsed, taking the Morwell River with it, and flooding the mine. 5 months later Energy Australia is still pumping billions of litres of contaminated water from the mine into the Latrobe River. Say no to new coal in Victoria http://environmentvictoria.org.au/emergency
S Africans sue government over polluted water
 
02:01
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Residents in the South African town of Carolina are taking the local government to court after their water supply was polluted by run-off from nearby coal mines. Despite measures to improve water quality, many people say it's still unsafe and accuse the authorities of not doing enough. Al Jazeera's Tania Page reports from Carolina.
Views: 2071 Al Jazeera English