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Globo & SafeLogic Explain FIPS 140-2 Validation
 
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http://www.globoplc.com https://www.goappzone.com https://www.facebook.com/GLOBOplc
Views: 1556 globoplc
MAP FIPS 140-2 Level 1 Encryption
 
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Maintain security control of your enterprise's mobile data. MAP provides a wide selection of powerful security policies, including authentication, data loss prevention (DLP), contextual usage, and secure communications to secure your apps, their data, and the connection to your enterprise. MAP utilizes standards-based security, enabling integration into existing network infrastructures and assurance of proven encryption algorithms. https://mocana.com/for-enterprise/
Views: 756 Mocana
Hardware root of trust with Google Cloud IoT Core and Microchip
 
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Check out how to improve IoT security by securing the authentication between Google Cloud IoT core and IoT devices using a secure element (ATECC608A) from Microchip.
Views: 3550 Google Cloud Platform
FIPS 140-2
 
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The Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) Publication 140-2, (FIPS PUB 140-2), is a U.S. government computer security standard used to accredit cryptographic modules. The title is Security Requirements for Cryptographic Modules. Initial publication was on May 25, 2001 and was last updated December 3, 2002. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 6272 Audiopedia
Crypto Defenses for Real-World System Threats - Kenn White - Ann Arbor
 
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Modern encryption techniques provide several important security properties, well known to most practitioners. Or are they? What are in fact the guarantees of, say, HTTPS TLS cipher suites using authenticated encryption, IPSec vs. SSL VPNs, Property Preserving Encryption, or token vaults? We live in an era of embedded Hardware Security Modules that cost less than $1 in volume, and countless options now exist for encrypting streaming network data, files, volumes, and even entire databases. Let's take a deep dive into the edge of developed practice to discuss real-world threat scenarios to public cloud and IoT data, and look closely at how we can address specific technical risks with our current encryption toolkits. Advanced math not required. Bio: Kenneth White is a security researcher whose work focuses on networks and global systems. He is co-director of the Open Crypto Audit Project (OCAP), currently managing a large-scale audit of OpenSSL on behalf of the Linux Foundation's Core Infrastructure Initiative. Previously, White was Principal Scientist at Washington DC-based Social & Scientific Systems where he led the engineering team that designed and ran global operations and security for the largest clinical trial network in the world, with research centers in over 100 countries. White co-founded CBX Group which provides security services to major organizations including World Health, UNICEF, Doctors without Borders, the US State Department, and BAO Systems. Together with Matthew Green, White co-founded the TrueCrypt audit project, a community-driven initiative to conduct the first comprehensive cryptanalysis and public security audit of the widely used TrueCrypt encryption software. White holds a Masters from Harvard and is a PhD candidate in neuroscience and cognitive science, with applied research in real-time classification and machine learning. His work on network security and forensics and been cited by media including the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Reuters, Wired and Nature. White is a technical reviewer for the Software Engineering Institute, and publishes and speaks frequently on computational modeling, security engineering, and trust. He tweets @kennwhite.
Views: 857 Duo Security
Developer Friendly Cryptography | Brice Williams | Hackers of CypherCon
 
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(S1: E5) Software developers often make mistakes when using cryptography in applications, which tends to result in code with dangerous and subtle weaknesses. Some of this can be addressed through training, but should we expect all developers to be cryptography experts? Many developers only know to avoid writing their own ciphers, and rely on one of the many incomplete or incorrect code examples that exist on the internet. To make things worse, most cryptographic libraries in use today are designed to be used by experts and often result in misunderstandings by the average application developer. In this talk we will look at some common cryptography usage errors and why popular libraries often fall short. We will also discuss nuances such as backwards compatibility, FIPS 140-2 validation, and weak standards such as JOSE/JWT that contribute to the overall confusion. Brice will share some advice that you can provide to the development/engineering teams in your organization to not only make their job easier, but also ensure more secure cryptographic implementations. CypherCon website: https://cyphercon.com Thank you for watching, subscribing and your support. You can now help this channel with BUY ME A COFFEE: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/VideoWorkbench Connect with Video Workbench Productions below: WEBSITE: http://www.videoworkbench.com AMAZON: https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Dinstant-video&field-keywords=Jason+Gares&rh=n%3A2858778011%2Ck%3AJason+Gareskeywords=video+workbench+productions VIMEO: https://vimeo.com/videoworkbench CURIOUS: https://curious.com/videoworkbench FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/VideoWorkbenchProductions IMDb: https://www.imdb.com/name/nm7907523/?ref_=nv_sr_1 Copyright © 2018 by Jason C. Gares, Video Workbench Productions, Michael Goetzman & Korgo. All Rights Reserved.
FIPS 140
 
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The 140 series of Federal Information Processing Standards are U.S. government computer security standards that specify requirements for cryptography modules. As of December 2006, the current version of the standard is FIPS 140-2, issued on 25 May 2001. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 187 Audiopedia
SHA-1
 
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In cryptography, SHA-1 is a cryptographic hash function designed by the United States National Security Agency and is a U.S. Federal Information Processing Standard published by the United States NIST. SHA-1 produces a 160-bit (20-byte) hash value. A SHA-1 hash value is typically rendered as a hexadecimal number, 40 digits long. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1045 Audiopedia
[2017] SAP HANA Security - Documentation: Data-at-rest Encryption Services - SAP HANA Academy
 
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In this video tutorial, Sinéad Higgins discusses the data-at-rest encryption services for SAP HANA. Watch more tutorials about SAP HANA documentation in our playlist: bit.ly/HANASecurity If you like our video tutorials, please subscribe to our channel: http://youtube.com/saphanaacademy CONNECT WITH US Feel free to connect with us at the links below: LinkedIn: https://linkedin.com/in/saphanaacademy Twitter: https://twitter.com/saphanaacademy Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/saphanaacademy/ Google+: https://plus.google.com/+saphanaacademy Github: https://github.com/saphanaacademy Thank you for watching. Video by the SAP HANA Academy.
Views: 1487 SAP HANA Academy
Livestream Day 3: Stage 1 (Google I/O '18)
 
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This livestream covers all of the Google I/O 2018 day 3 sessions that take place on Stage 1. Stay tuned for technical sessions and deep dives into Google's latest developer products and platforms. Event schedule (all times are PDT) → https://goo.gl/x5ENpG 23:12 - Navigation 1:19:15 - What's new in Android security 2:17:35 - Personalize Actions for the Google Assistant 3:16:31 - Intro to machine learning on Google Cloud Platform 5:16:25 - What's new with ConstraintLayout and Android Studio design tools 6:16:46 - Android Jetpack: manage infinite lists with RecyclerView and Paging 7:16:20 - Distributed TensorFlow training Google I/O 2018 All Sessions playlist → https://goo.gl/q1Tr8x Subscribe to the Google Developers channel → http://goo.gl/mQyv5L Music by Terra Monk → https://goo.gl/wPgbHP
Views: 14931 Google Developers
Bcrypt
 
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bcrypt is a key derivation function for passwords designed by Niels Provos and David Mazières, based on the Blowfish cipher, and presented at USENIX in 1999. Besides incorporating a salt to protect against rainbow table attacks, bcrypt is an adaptive function: over time, the iteration count can be increased to make it slower, so it remains resistant to brute-force search attacks even with increasing computation power. The bcrypt function is the default password hash algorithm for BSD and many other systems. The prefix "$2a$" or "2y" in a hash string in a shadow password file indicates that hash string is a bcrypt hash in modular crypt format. The rest of the hash string includes the cost parameter, a 128-bit salt (base-64 encoded as 22 characters), and the 192-bit hash value (base-64 encoded as 31 characters). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 859 Audiopedia
Verification and Secure Systems
 
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Bugs in security-critical system software already cost society billions of dollars, and the need for secure software is increasing as more devices are connected to the Internet. This session will outline the security needs of network-connected systems and explore how formal verification can help secure them. We’ll present research on bringing high-value security to low-cost devices, particularly those powered by microcontrollers – a class of devices ill-prepared for the security challenges of Internet connectivity. We’ll also discuss advances in verification tools and techniques that lead to real, usable verified software, with an emphasis on critical systems such as distributed and operating systems, cloud infrastructure, networking protocols and cryptography. Finally, we’ll present an overview of the Azure Sphere product as part of Microsoft’s efforts to secure MCU-based devices. See more at https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/research/video/verification-and-secure-systems/
Views: 1126 Microsoft Research
Smart card
 
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A smart card, chip card, or integrated circuit card (ICC) is any pocket-sized card with embedded integrated circuits. Smart cards are made of plastic, generally polyvinyl chloride, but sometimes polyethylene terephthalate based polyesters, acrylonitrile butadiene styrene or polycarbonate. Since April 2009, a Japanese company has manufactured reusable financial smart cards made from paper. Smart cards can provide identification, authentication, data storage and application processing. Smart cards may provide strong security authentication for single sign-on (SSO) within large organizations. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 866 Audiopedia
Attacking encrypted USB keys the hard(ware) way - Blackhat USA 2017
 
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Recording our our Blackhat Talk about attacking encrypted USB key. More info: https://elie.net/talk/attacking-encrypted-usb-keys-the-hardware-way Ever wondered if your new shiny AES hardware-encrypted USB device really encrypts your data - or is just a fluke? If you have, come to our talk to find out if those products live up to the hype and hear about the results of the audit we conducted on multiples USB keys and hard drives that claim to securely encrypt data. In this talk, we will present our methodology to assess "secure" USB devices both from the software and the hardware perspectives. We will demonstrate how this methodology works in practice via a set of case-studies. We will demonstrate some of the practical attacks we found during our audit so you will learn what type of vulnerability to look for and how to exploit them. Armed with this knowledge and our tools, you will be able to evaluate the security of the USB device of your choice.
Views: 1154 Elie Bursztein
HSM 101  What is a Hardware Security Module
 
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What is a hardware security module? A hardware security module is a dedicated crypto processor, designed to protect the crypto key lifecycle, validated for security by third parties (FIPS 140-2, Common Criteria, PCI HSM, FIPS 201). A hardware security module is a trust anchor. A trust anchor that protects the things we use every day. Things like SSL, DNS, banking and websites. Mobile devices. Smart meters. Medical devices. National identity cards. Credit card data and PINs. Mobile payments and verbal banking. Digital documents. Passports.
Views: 1511 CTOBuddy
Ionic tutorials 2   28  Load Data Within Lifecycle
 
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ionic, ionic framework, cordova, ionic 2, android, fitbit ionic, ionic 3, fitbit ionic review, angular, tutorial, javascript, ios, html5, fitbit, angularjs, html, tutorial ionic, ionic 3 tutorial, ionic tutorial, ionic desde cero, ionic 4, app, mobile app, mobile, fitbit smartwatch, typescript, smartwatch, framework, hybrid, mobile application software (industry), phonegap, angular 2, apps, css, windows phone, ionic, ionic2, mobile app, html, native apps, ionic 3 app, ionic 3, lauren goode, verge, the verge, apple watch, fitbit pay, apps, activity tracker, fitness tracker, smartwatch, wearables, fitbit ionic review, fitbit ionic, build a mobile app, hybrid, mobile, html5, wunderground api, web, google developer conference, google event, developer news, developers, chrome, #usetheplatform, use the platform, #polymersummit, google chrome, web development, polymer 3.0, polymer tutorials, polymer library, web components, adam bradley
Views: 165 tutorials lab

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